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Mercury Retrograde In Aries (and How to Use Tarot to Survive and Thrive)

Several years ago, I made a post here on Pagan Square about the ins and outs of Mercury Retrograde. You can get the scoop at this link.

Mercury goes Retrograde March 22nd through April 15th in 2018 in fiery Aries. To recap my other blog post, Mercury is a trickster god that symbolizes communications of all types--including the technology associated with messages.

Aries is symbolized by The Ram, an impetuous, aggressive energy that heralds the first day of Spring--a time of fresh starts.


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In Which Our Intrepid Blogger Reviews a Book on a (Gasp!) Non-Pagan Subject

This is Not the Resurrection You're Looking For

Resurrecting Easter would be a better book if it knew what it wanted to be. Art history? A husband-wife travelogue? A mystery novel à la Da Vinci Code?

Unfortunately, it never manages to decide.

In it, Jesus Seminar rockstar John Dominic Crossan and his wife Sarah travel to the ends of Christendom to tell the story of the emergence of the iconography of the Resurrection. (He writes, she takes the pictures.) This important topic has received surprisingly little attention from art historians. Apart from Anna Kartsonis' magisterial 1988 Anastasis: The Making of an Image, there are virtually no monographs on the subject. The Phaidon Press series of anthologies on the art of Holy Week—Last Supper, Crucifixion, and Descent (i.e. deposition from the cross)—does not, surprisingly, devote a volume to the art of the Resurrection. Somehow, when it comes to art history, it's always Nativity, never Pascha.

So I praise the Crossans for perceiving this lack and attempting to address it. It's a pity they couldn't do so more successfully.

Oh, they do manage to chronicle the emergence and development of Christendom's two major visual representations of the Resurrection, with some attention to various dead ends and roads-not-taken along the way. Unfortunately, the art-historical material is interspersed almost randomly with pointless tales from their travels, including local-color details about what time they caught the cab and what T-shirt the driver was wearing. The quest—and narrative—are driven by forced cliff-hanger questions about the iconography (“What happens to the universal resurrection tradition in Eastern Christianity during that same fateful period?”) that are meant to seem urgent but mostly fall flat.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I can go onto Bing images and type in resurrection to get a whole bunch of pictures. If I haven't run out of ink in my printer I

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Sifting for Gold

It’s a soft, rainy spring day. I’m grateful for the rain—we need it—and for the lush green it has brought to the hills and meadows, the vineyards carpeted with bright mustard flowers.

These are such challenging times. The circumstances of my personal life are stressful and frightening; the broader culture is caught in the nightmare of Donald Trump’s willful smashing of all that is decent and righteous. Friends are struggling to make ends meet; my area is still grappling with the incomprehensible shock of last October’s wildfires.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Time of We

The ancestors thought in generations.

They didn't say: One hundred years ago. They said: Four generations ago. They measured time in human lives. They measured time in story.

Generational time is time-as-lived, time-in-relation. This is collective time, the time of We.

“Many, many years ago,” says the old lore-master, “maybe 500 generations back, when the land shook and all the goats were wild, Sikander Julkhan marched his great armies east.” So begins the saga of his people (Bealby 218).

Thinking in generations makes us part of the story. Thinking in generations saves us from isolation. Thinking in generations makes us take responsibility.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs



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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

Traditional lore can inform, gently point to mysteries, and outright open gateways. But, nowadays, in the Pagan community, rigid interpretation of lore often becomes a stranglehold on magical and spiritual practices.


I’ve spent years learning lore, meditating on it so it can inform shamanic lessons I give, and creating ritual based in lore. So I’d be the first to insist that, sometimes, lore provides definitive, irrefutable facts. However, common sense is needed.  


My mother taught me to think for myself. It was one of the greatest gifts a parent can give. 


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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Tasha, thank you so much for your kind words. I’m so glad you relate to what I’m saying. Bright blessings back at you!
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    What you said in this well written piece is right on in my book. Thank you for putting it so well. There are many masks worn by th
  • Dragon Dancer
    Dragon Dancer says #
    I feel you on this. I have a (tentative, I'm still very new and learning) relationship with Death as an entity, usually presenting
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    On pages 90-91 of "The Candle and the Crossroads" by Orion Foxwood the author says: "The next and very famous of the traditional s
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Anthony, thank you so much for adding to the conversation. It’ll be interesting to see what Dragon Dancer has to say to you. Sp
One Advantage of Hosting the Ritual... that you get all the leftovers.

My festive First-Day-of-Spring breakfast:

  • Steamed asparagus
  • Toasted sesame egg bread
  • Fresh farmer's cheese with garden chives
  • Ostara eggs with hot sauce
  • Fresh strawberries
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