PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Thinking Outside the Magic Circle

“I've never been to one of those kinds of rituals before!” the little girl enthused.

What she meant was a ritual with offerings and prayers. Clearly, the experience had come as something of a revelation.

We'd just completed our annual Offering to Minnehaha Falls. The priestess stands at the head of the Falls and makes the traditional threefold offering of water, meal, and flowers, while praying for life, sustenance, and inspiration for the People, for the year to come.

I don't know about where you live, but around here pagan ritual tends to involve casting circles, calling quarters, and raising cones. There's nothing wrong with that, but there's more to pagan ritual than summoning, stirring, and pointing knives at.

A lot more.

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  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Thanks for your lovely and well said column. As I learned long ago, it's not just about "church on Sundays" so to seak, it's havin

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Opening Lines

It's still one of the best opening lines that I've ever heard.

A buddy and I had gone over to 'Saint' Paul to check out the new Ethiopian restaurant.

While we were there, I noticed at a nearby table a woman with very intense eyes, giving the waiter a hard time.

Tough customer, I thought.

About halfway through the meal, I looked up to see the tough customer standing at our table. Those intense eyes were on me now.

“I like your pentagram,” she said, then paused. “I have one too.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
All My Roads Lead South

I’ve had so many people encourage me to leave the South over the years, because they think I don’t belong here. They’re sure I’d be happier somewhere above the Mason-Dixon, despite my aversion to cold weather. I’m not convinced that my journey would be any easier, just different.

I was born and raised in the mountains of North Georgia near the southern terminus of the Appalachian Trail. I spent 17 years in Atlanta, six years in Savannah, and I’m currently residing in lower Alabama. If anything, life keeps pushing me deeper into the South instead of carrying me away from her. I have to believe there’s a reason for that, so I’ve decided to embrace the two aspects of my identity that don’t seem to go together at all: witchiness and southernness.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Ariel Aron
    Ariel Aron says #
    I'm so glad I'm not alone in this. I live in southeast Georgia I look forward to the Savanna pagan pride days every year to social
  • Jennifer Miller
    Jennifer Miller says #
    You are definitely not alone. Savannah Pagan Pride is a blast. I really enjoyed it when lived there, especially with all the color
  • Suzanne Tidewater
    Suzanne Tidewater says #
    Thanks for sharing your perspective!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Cauldron Quest

The good news: there's finally a good (i.e. historically trustworthy) book about the Grail.

The bad news: if you're looking for deep pagan mysteries, there aren't any. The Grail is entirely a product of the Christian imagination.

To put it differently: in the seething cauldron that is the human imagination, Grail lore is a stew made from Christian ingredients, with only the merest hint of pagan seasoning.

In medievalist Richard Barber's masterful The Holy Grail: Imagination and Belief, Barber traces the origin of the Grail, term and motif, from its entirely orthodox Christian beginnings in late 12th century northern France to its transubstantiation into a secular (and, latterly, new pagan) symbol in the 20th and 21st centuries. It's a fascinating ride.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Living cultures have the wisdom to learn from one another. So far as I can tell, that's how we've always done it. Come to think of
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Well, that's actually quite refreshing. I thought it was a stretch to link the grail to Cerridwen's cauldron. Why not Dagda's ca

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
EMERGENCY - GLOBAL CALL TO ACTION

To say the least, this has been a rough time, GLOBALLY. The negative energies have been building and building. Leading up to now; we've seen a frightening escalation of war, strife, political discord, division and hate, and now the extreme weather, floods, and fire...

I won't go on because to do so would be overstating the obvious.

...
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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Hello, I have a few hypotheticals to throw at you, please bear with me. You have been invited to be a guest speaker at an anime/m

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Ride the Wild Eclipse Weather

Eclipses are said to be a closing of one door and an opening of a window. At this past full moon on 6th September I did some Tarot queries using Joanna Colbert Powell's Gaian Tarot. The results were a bit counter-intuitive. A full moon is a culmination, but all the cards were pointing to beginnings and letting go so the new could happen. So eclipse season ain't over yet. Nope! The weather happening globally is the narrative set by the eclipse.

Fire and water are duking it out all over the USA. Here in Ireland, after a relatively dry (for us) winter, spring and summer, Lunasadh has brought the monsoon season upon us. In our boggy, heavy clay laden west of Ireland the water tends to pool. There is only so much land can hold and then it just lies on top. In winter we have these naturally occurring lakes called turloughs that evaporate in summer. Well, the turloughs are arriving early! And our car engine was killed when some local flooding on our lane turned out to be deeper than estimated.

...
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Introducing Goddessing Heart: Living Compassionate Presence

Greetings PaganSquare readers! I am honored to be starting a blog here and sharing my perspective on sacred Goddess practice. I’ve been blogging at Goddessing From the Heart. My writing centers on affirming trauma survivors on their journey through Goddess Spirituality. I received my Ph.D. in Psychology from a university in the Midwest and work as a full-time college professor. You can connect with me at my page on Facebook (Goddessing From the Heart) and follow me @goddessingheart on Instagram and Twitter.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Suzanne Tidewater
    Suzanne Tidewater says #
    Thanks Tasha! I am excited to join the community!
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    I look forward to the conversation and to your blog. Warm wishes, Tasha

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