PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Thanks Be to the Blood

I love my moon time, I love everything about it. 

 

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CRYSTALS WHICH ARE BROKEN IN OUR CARE: what it means

This is addressing the second part of a question posed to me (the first part of the question is found here). The questioner asked:

"Sometimes [crystals]  jump from my hand or I drop another crystal on them accidentally, etc. I am brand new at this and don't know how to proceed. Thank you" - K. S.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

Invocation

I stand in the center of the wheel, Goddess, and I ask for your guidance, your essence, and your blessings.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_hare-with-moon-and-stars.jpg

Have you heard? Apparently, it’s a Super-Duper Blue Blood Moon Leo Lunar Eclipse and we’re all gonna die! Again! While having great sex!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Horse and Hattock

In 1662 Scottish witch Isobel Gowdie reported using this incantation before riding off to the sabbat:

Horse and hattock, in [Old Hornie's] name!

It is worth noting that this phrase, as it stands, conforms to the standard four-beat line of Old English poetry, its two half-lines bound together by alliteration: the meter, for instance, of Beowulf. This, no doubt, we may ascribe to coincidence.

She also reports a longer version of the same incantation, in the form of a rhymed couplet:

Horse and hattock, horse and go,

horse and pellatis, ho ho!

The Craft has always been characterized by mysteriousness and practicality in equal measures, and we see the same principle in operation here.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Foundations of Incense: Myrrh

It’s true that frankincense is the most famous incense resin, it is almost automatic when you say “frankincense” to want to immediately say “and myrrh”.  In antiquity the two were in nearly equal demand.  Although used more for the making of perfumes, myrrh was frequently burned in the same manner as frankincense.  While frankincense is a fairly simple scent to work with, myrrh presents far more complications.  Frankincense is a sweet, bright scent.  Myrrh is a complex, dark scent that can easily overpower other scents.  If you’ve ever been to one of my workshops you know that I am an advocate of spending time with individual incense ingredients.  Sometimes by listening to your ingredients they will tell you things that they’ve told to no other person.  Myrrh has a lot to say and is worth devoting the time.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Hearth M Rising
    Hearth M Rising says #
    I have never combined myrrh with sandalwood but will try it (over charcoal). I do like the smell of myrrh, but find few spellcast

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