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PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Welcome to An Atheopagan Path!

I’m Mark Green. I’ve been a Pagan since 1987, and an atheist since I was born.

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Pagan News Beagle: Earthy Thursday, March 30 2017

Astrobiologists take heed of new discoveries about Earth's primordial past. Ice levels in the arctic fall alarmingly low. And the debate over Pluto's status continues. It's Earthy Thursday, our segment on science and Earth-related news. All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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What If the Word for 'Make Love' Were the Name of a Goddess?

Frig and Frig.

Etymologists are pretty much agreed that there's no direct connection between the verb frig (euphemistic for f**k) and the divine name Frig (the Anglo-Saxon goddess for whom Friday was named).

But what a gift of a coincidence it is.

Imagine: a culture in which the word for 'making love' was the name of a goddess.

How good is that?

Robert Cochrane, the father of the contemporary Old Craft movement, used to sign his letters 3 (or 4) Fs. This alludes to an old tongue-in-cheek Devonshire saying: Flax, flags, fodder (and frig). These are the three (or four) necessities of life: clothing, shelter, food, and love.

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
A Visit with the Asynjur

A Visit with the Asynjur: Frigga’s Handmaidens

I have been delving deeper into seeking out lesser-known goddesses for this little project of mine, and decided that the Asynjur, also known as the Handmaidens of the Norse Goddess Frigga were certainly deserving of attention. I began to try and read through Snorri Sturluson and the Eddas as my first source for Norse lore, however it because abundantly clear that something was probably missing. Anyone who has tried to view these ancient writings with a modern eye can discern that most of these stories were re-told by Christian monks with an eye to selling them as pre-cursors to Christianity. Naturally, preserving the stories of female characters was not at the forefront of their minds. I do not consider myself Asatru, nor do I consider myself a reconstructionist of any kind, so I will apologize in advance for any unintended offenses I may make in my own re-interpretation of these Goddesses. I have a love for deities whose stories are not fully known or told, and as such, I am also open to UPG. As I create my own images of the Goddesses, please know I do so with utter respect and love for the cultures from which they came.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    For further study on the Handmaidens, I recommend Norse Goddess Magic by Alice Karlsdottir. That's a new edition of the book previ
  • Helena
    Helena says #
    Thank you!
  • d Kate dooley
    d Kate dooley says #
    I you offer prints, I want them for my ritual space.
  • d Kate dooley
    d Kate dooley says #
    This makes me so happy. I love your work. I wrote book for Frigga and the Handmaidens and have been their devotee for sixteen year
  • Helena
    Helena says #
    Thank you so much! I will definitely check out your blog. And I will definitely let you know about prints. Finding time to make t

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Blossom Magic

Blossoms

The blossom or flowers from any tree or plant can be popped into a vase to dress up your altar or dried or pressed to use in magical workings, incense blends and crafts.  Dried petals and flowers can also be pressed onto candles quite effectively or steeped in oil to create anointing oils and perfumes.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Sacred Items Series: Kagura suzu

In Japanese spiritual practices, such as Shinto, Jinja Shinto, Konkokyo, Onmyoudou, and more - there are various sacred and ritual items used.
You may have seen photos of them, or if you are lucky, have been able to see them in person at a shrine, temple, or other place of worship.

Have you ever wondered what the meanings, or origins of them were? Or their purpose? Well, look no further! With these series of articles, I hope to help educate all about these sacred items.

So let’s get started! The first entry I will do is about Kagura suzu


 

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

Our last blog post was Part 1 of building the Cernunnos Shrine.  Picking up here right where that one left off….

 

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