PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Recent blog posts

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Name (Tribe)

There's a conventional usage in the First Nations press which I think, for various reasons, would be a good fit for the pagan community as well.

There it's customary to identify someone both by name and by tribal affiliation:

Winona la Duke (Anishinabe)

Arvol Looking Horse (Dakota)

This makes perfect sense. In traditional societies, you don't just need to know who someone is; you need to know who her people are as well. In traditional Dine (Navajo) culture, when introducing yourself to a fellow Dine, you mention not just your own name, but your maternal and paternal clans as well. This gives you not just an identity, but a context.

Since pagans come in different kinds, it seems to me that this makes sense for us, too:

Isaac Bonewits (Druid)

Alison Harlow (Feri)

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Call It Payback

In his 1693 book, Wonders of the Invisible World, New England Puritan divine Cotton Mather (1663-1728) wrote that “The witches are organized like Congregational Churches.”

By this he meant that individual covens were fully autonomous: each one ruled by a council of elders, lacking any overarching jurisdictional body.

281 years later, in 1974, Covenant of the Goddess was founded.

As it happens, founding mother Alison Harlow (1934-2004) once told me that while drawing up CoG's initial paperwork, she and her colleagues remembered Mather's words—which Margaret Murray had cited in her 1921 Witch-Cult in Western Europe—and decided to follow Mather's advice. That's how they ended up taking the charter of the Congregationalist churches (now the United Church of Christ) as the new organization's starting point.

In this way, the Archpuritan himself, Scourge of New England Witches, Champion of the Salem Witch Trials, was instrumental in helping to found the oldest, largest, and most successful organization of witches, warlocks, and covens in the world.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    There must be particularly high levels of it around here. I hear there are plans to mine it, if they can get it past the EPA.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I believe that Irony is one of those subatomic particles that our scientists are trying to identify.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
And to the Republic Where Witches Dance

Why am I a Pagan?

Because pagans dance.

Lots of people dance, sure. But when we dance, it's part of our religion.

“Do witches pray?” asks the reporter.

The witch smiles.

“We dance,” she says.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_chastain_20171112-031553_1.jpg

Title: Deadlines and Dryads (A Terra Haven Chronicles Prequel)

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
The Cosmic Horae

Order, Justice and Peace Shall Rule

 I've chosen this month of elections, Thanksgiving and change of the seasons to share this article that was written in 2012 and part of an anthology. Order and justice are being tested continually and the peace that we desire is elusive as we move through the eternal cycles of change and time's demands. The Horae are reminders that we are part of a larger cycle of Cosmic order....

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

I often carry a medicine bag or pouch 
wherever I go.
But I am seeing now,
I AM a bag of medicine.”

—Mahada Thomas (We’Moon)

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Why Are You Pagan?

I'll be speaking to the local Theosophists this coming January on Why I Am a Pagan.

So let me ask: why are you pagan?

Why are so many of us pagans?

You might think that in the Marketplace of Religions the paganisms lost out long ago.

Yet today, world Pagandom is estimated to number somewhere between 7 and 10 million people.

That's a lot of pagans.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Lisa Jean Fleming Philpot
    Lisa Jean Fleming Philpot says #
    Why am I pagan? Because as a child in a world where woman are (even in this day) told to sit down shut up and just listen while "t
  • Lisa Jean Fleming Philpot
    Lisa Jean Fleming Philpot says #
    take the you out of "church service you up leaves"... i hate being dyslexic
  • Kile Martz
    Kile Martz says #
    I am currently pondering my attraction to pagan beliefs with intensity. Why is it making sense to me at this point in my life? Fo

Additional information