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Posted by on in Pagan News Beagle
Faithful Friday December 5

In today's Faithful Friday post of the PaganNewsBeagle we highlight a Goddess blogger interviewed on the HuffPo; indigenous Saami of the North; "Celtic knot" tattoos; tattoos of the ancestors; Pagan Christmas history.

PaganSquare blogger Karen Tate discusses liberation theology and the Goddess in this interview at the HuffingtonPost.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_openness-1.jpgFor each of the Vanic virtues, I plan on writing something on how Vanic pagans can better incorporate these virtues into their daily lives, living Vanatru.  So with the fifth virtue, Openness, here is a list of suggestions (not demands, I am not interested in telling people what to do) of activities to better express this virtue:

-At least once a month, but preferably once a week or every other week, try something new.  Like trying a new food, or new type of cuisine.  Going someplace that you've been curious about, but haven't gotten around to yet.  Taking a different route home.  Read a new book.  Doesn't have to be something major - even just new little experiences can help foster openness.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
That mistletoe Druid thing

This is me and my chap at last year’s mistletoe rite. It was cold, hence my failed attempts at rolling into a ball like a hedgehog. Midwinter is usually a tough time for outdoor ritual, but the attraction of Druids to mistletoe means outdoors is where you need to be. I’ve been to rituals working with pre-cut mistletoe, and it isn’t at the same. It’s a much more immediate experience when you’re in the process of removing a living, parasitic plant from the tree branch it has grown on. We go to an apple orchard, where there is a great deal of mistletoe, singing, and good cheer.

Rituals often raise interesting issues about what we do for real, and what we gently fake. The Great rite is a frequent case in point. We turn suspicions of historic sacrifice into corn dollies, offer wine and mead to the earth and not blood. Often a Druid ritual can seem less like an encounter with raw and wild nature, more like something safe and on the edges of familiarity. But then, England doesn’t have much wilderness, most of our more dangerous wildlife is gone – no bears and wolves round here, and I’ve not seen a boar.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Nimue Brown
    Nimue Brown says #
    We have to be where we are and work with what we have - I had no idea about the juniper mistletoe - as we don't get that here. The
  • Linette
    Linette says #
    I'm not a recon, even so, I run into similar issues. We live in this age, in this culture, and our rituals are often honed to THIS
PaganNewsBeagle Earthy Thurs Dec 4

Howdy Earthlings! Today's Earthy Thursday post at the PaganNewsBeagle celebrates pingos; aging hikers; sexy hellbenders; Superfund refuges; and native bees.

What's a pingo? And why might they be endangered due to climate change?

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Dancing the Carol

The first carols were not songs, nor were they specific to Yule.

For pagan religion is preeminently danced religion.

“Carol”* originally meant a round dance (one of the first recorded uses of the word in English—from 1330—referred to a “carol of the stones,” i. e. a stone circle**), and specifically a ring-dance performed to sung rather than instrumental accompaniment. (They say that when it wasn't safe to have musical instruments at the sabbat, we danced there to songs and mouth-music instead. At the sabbat, you can't not dance.)

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Linette
    Linette says #
    Thank you for this! one thing I miss as a currently solitary (I live far removed from civilization) is the dance. It is a magical

The guiding principle of nature is More and Different is Better, and left to its own devices without significant outside intervention, it will tend to wild leaps of evolutionary diversity – witness the examples in our own world of isolated islands featuring hundreds of animal and plant species found nowhere else on the planet. With this understanding, we too should seek to honor and respect our diversity, and also that the key to communication and interconnectedness is to remain open to possibility and wonder.

(Nicanthiel Hrafnhild in my book Visions of Vanaheim)

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Skiing Mt. Herman, Bethlehem and Old City Jerusalem, Israel

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