PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Recent blog posts
Pagan Ms. Manners: Does Skyclad Mean Barefoot Too?

Dear Pagan Ms. Manners:

Does skyclad necessarily mean barefoot too?

It's hard to raise a cone when you can't feel your feet.

Frostbitten in Fargo

 
Dear Bitten:

Having grown up in the North Country, where "Minnesota skyclad" means no parka, I can thoroughly sympathize with your problem.

Here's the thing to remember: skyclad liberates because it gives you the freedom to adorn the body without having to cover it.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I hear that most of those advice columnists just make up most of the letters.
  • john stitely
    john stitely says #
    While your articles are always thought provoking, , the answer to the question seems obvious and is summed up in the proverb,
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    A writer could hardly ask for higher praise. Thanks for writing, Angela.
  • Angela
    Angela says #
    Every time I see an article title pop up and am intrigued enough to click and read, I don't dont often pay enough attention to see
Pagan News Beagle: Fiery Tuesday, October 10 2017

Trans people in Mexico turn to a local folk saint for patronage. Experts debunk the idea that stress doesn't affect people of color. And Costa Rica's Savegre River obtains protection from UNESCO. It's Fiery Tuesday, our segment about societal and political news from around the globe! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
A Minoan by Any Other Name

If the ancient Minoans were such successful traders with so many other cultures, why don't we hear about them in the writings of those other cultures? Because in the ancient world, they weren't called Minoans.

The term "Minoans" is a 20th-century invention. Sir Arthur Evans, the British archaeologist who unearthed the temple complex at Knossos, had been chasing a set of myths for years: King Minos, the Labyrinth, Ariadne and the Minotaur. Like Heinrich Schliemann, who wanted to prove the truth of the tales in Homer's epic works by digging up the real city of Troy, Evans wanted to prove the historicity of the myths about ancient Crete.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Archer
    Archer says #
    I really enjoyed this and look forward to learning more about the "Minoans". I love the way you combine mystery, historicity and i
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    Thank you! I try to make it clear where I'm speculating or working off gnosis (mine and/or that of others). But there's simply so

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Reweaving the Reft in Time

The ancient Greeks dated years from the (mythic) foundation of the Olympic Games.

The ancient Romans dated years from the (mythic) foundation of the city of Rome.

We, however, date our years from the (mythic) birth of Christ.

Call it “Common Era” if you like, but clearly we need a more fitting way to count sacred time. We need some other pivotal mythic event from which to number our years.

For my pentacles, the best proposal to date comes from Merlin Stone's seminal 1979 essay “9980: Repairing the Time Warp,” in which she proposes that we date our old-new year-count from the beginning of agriculture.

For better and for worse, agriculture has changed everything that came after it. It's an event of both historic and mythic proportion. Better yet, it's something that we all share.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    Interesting idea, and perhaps impractical for actual use, however interesting all the same.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Well, since all dating systems are, in effect, arbitrary, I suppose some would recalibrate their calendar in the wake of new archa
  • Kayly
    Kayly says #
    But the changing dates are the problem. If we set our current year as 12,017 and in ten years, they find that agriculture is 10,0

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_partholon.jpg

Title: Divine By Mistake (originally published as Goddess By Mistake)

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Squaring the Wheel of the Year

While participating in Joanna Colbert Powell's 30Days e-courses around the Wheel of the Year in 2016, I revived my practice of creating seasonal altars. But recently I have started being a bit counter intuitive to the seasonal symbols. I have had to have a bit of a ponder, squaring up what my unconscious was nudging me to create with what my more logical, conscious self was prescribing as 'appropriate' for the current station on the Wheel of the Year.

First off, I have to say that I have twin devotions to Brigid and Danu. Since Danu's feast is in June she precides from June to the January New Year. Then Brigid is the deity who has pride of place. So you see Danu in this photo of an altar I created this week just before the Aries Full Moon. 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Pagans, Pagans Everywhere

And this year's award for Most Beautiful Working Pagan Temple goes to...the pagan community of...(drum-roll, please)....Armenia!

The Temple of Garni, shown here, was likely built during the 1st century CE as a temple to Mihr (= Mithras). Toppled by an earthquake in 1679, it was reconstructed between 1969 and 1975, and has since become the national shrine of the New Pagans of Armenia. They hold rituals there regularly and, in fact, are in the process of planting a sacred grove of almond trees around it.

Now that's style.

Yes, there are pagans in Armenia. There are pagans everywhere. Check out the Wikipedia page on the Armenian community and follow the links at the bottom. You'll be amazed at where they take you.

Ossetia. Daghestan. Kirghizistan. Mongolia. Across Central Europe and Central Asia, New Pagan movements have sprung up since independence like mushrooms after rain, as people ponder their post-colonial identity and direction. Tengrism—the traditional shamanic worship of Tengri, Blue Father Sky—has undergone a massive resurgence across the steppes of Asia. In some countries, pagans actually constitute a substantial percentage of the population.

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