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Posted by on in Culture Blogs


b2ap3_thumbnail_bullcoin.jpgProsperity - a successful, flourishing, or thriving condition, especially in financial respects

We all want to be happy, and see those we care for to be happy as well. To be successful at what we do, to flourish and thrive is what all humans hope for. But why does it so often involve money? To be sure there are tribes that do not use money. The Bushmen of the Kalahri are happy to be eating ostrich eggs and boar’s heads, cooked in hot sand and embers, and feel extra privileged to get a bite of mostly cooked boar anus or a roasted beetle. Jakob Malas, a Khomani hunter from a section of the Kalahari that is now Gemsbok National Park says "The Kalahari is like a big farmyard, it is not wilderness to us. We know every plant animal and insect, and know how to use them. No other people could ever know and love this farm like us." * They do not feel poor. They have few material possessions, but they dance and sing.

And we might envy that happiness, that simplicity. Life in the Western world is hard apace, and filled with choices and conflicts. We lack the deep knowledge and support of each other that comes with living closely in groups. Modern economists call this social capital. And money can be very hard to think about. My mother, raised during the great depression, used to agonize over balancing her checkbook to the penny. She would sit at the kitchen table and moan and swear. The consequences for not thinking about money are high. We can loose our mode of transportation or our home. But it is worth noting that the consequences for the bushman who fails to think ahead are even higher.

In truth, even in the developed nations, we have the option of checking out of the economy. People have been making communes for generations, some of them non-monetary where resources and labor are pooled for a common goal. And yet only a small portion of the population chooses to do this at any given time.

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For folks who have the day off this Monday, October 12 in celebration of Columbus Day, the holiday may seem like a good enough idea.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_kid-on-a-seesaw.jpg"An insight the size of a mustard seed is powerful enough to bring down a mountain-sized illusion that may be holding our lives together. Truth strikes without mercy. We fear our intuitions because we fear the transformational power within our revelations.”
~ Caroline Myss

Get ready to ride the teeter-totter as the New Moon births itself in Libra, sign of balance, in opposition to Uranus, playing The Fool in Aries on Monday at 8:06 pm EDT. On a national level, social justice will be a topic of some concern, and on a personal level, we’ll be looking for balance, justice, truth, and spiritual growth in relationships.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
How to Make a Paganism

Gods, there really are pagans everywhere.

Urglaawe (pronounced OOR-glaw-veh) means “Primal Faith” in Pennsylvania “Dutch.” It's a New World Heathenry from the land of hex signs and powwowing.

Between 1683 and the War of 1812, tens of thousands of German-speaking migrants from the Palatinate and Switzerland, along with significant numbers of Silesians, Moravians, and Swabians, settled in the New World. Initially spearheaded by Mennonites and Amish seeking religious freedom, later waves consisted primarily of economic migrants. These are the Deitsch, who through the following 300 years have managed to maintain their own distinctive language and culture.

Die Deitscherei—literally, “Dutchery”—is their name for Pennsylvania Dutch Country in what is now eastern Pennsylvania and contiguous parts of Maryland and Delaware, but die Breet-Deitscherei (“Greater Dutchery”) includes those non-contiguous areas of Pennsylvania, New York, Delaware, Maryland, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Ontario with significant enclaves that self-identify as Deitsch.

Well folks, there's Heide—heathens—in Deitschland.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Magical systems just want to cross-pollinate.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I've been interested in Pennsylvania hexcraft since my dad drove us from Massachusetts to North Carolina to visit relatives back i

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Gerald Gardner, Terrorist

In this season of the ancestors, a tale of the ancestors.

Gerald Gardner was living on the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea when he initiated Arnold and Pat Crowther. After their handfasting (“The Bride Wore Black When the Witches Wed”), which Gerald himself performed, they got their own place in Sheffield and set up a temple in the attic.

Pat wrote to Gerald and asked if he would fly over from Man to consecrate the temple. Delighted, Gerald agreed.

On the day of the flight, the Crowthers drive to the airport to collect Gerald. Waiting on the tarmac, they watch Gerald get off the plane, limping pronouncedly.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Sable Aradia
    Sable Aradia says #
    Love it!
Pagan News Beagle: Faithful Friday, October 9

The Dalai Lama comes under fire for allegations of sexism. Kurdistan's women fight back against ISIL. And learn the details of the recently celebrated Sukkot festival. It's Faithful Friday, our weekly news segment on religions from around the world. All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Fall Reflections

Samhain or Halloween, the year is waning. The sun is out less and less (in the northern hemisphere).  The weather is more unpredictable (depending on where you are).  The dark of the year is coming. 

What does this mean?  What are we meant to do with the dark of the year?  It’s a time to harvest all the things you’ve been doing for the spring and summer.  It’s a time of year when you start to pull your energy into yourself to reflect on how you’ve been doing, where you are with your goals, and life in general.

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