PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Recent blog posts

It’s been a busy time for me lately. As a magical mother I’m always doing two things or more at once, every day an endless list of practicalities, and my spiritual life is by necessity deeply enmeshed in the mortal physical world. I see no separation between magic and the mundane, I walk through the worlds seamlessly.  But there are times when I feel particularly blessed, when the realms of spirit come to me and I am given space, connection, without purpose, without focus, other than to touch and feed the soul, just a time to revel  in the love of the Otherworld.

Yesterday I walked the dog and child through endless meadows filled with knee high golden buttercups, purple clover and wild white cow-parsley, like sea-foam, as the glorious heat of the day began to subside, and the mists rolled and billowed from the many rhynes, or watery ditches that lace the fields around my home, in the marshes that surround Glastonbury Tor. I waded through clouds of gold and green and white flowers all wrapped in the white mists of Avalon. Soon the Tor ahead of me vanished into clouds, and the meadows became wreathed in their own eerie shimmering light. A buzzard, my ally and kin from the realms Above swooped overhead and vanished into the white encircling walls of mist, and it seemed we had wandered into Faerie. Dog and child leaped and played, and I gathered armfuls of fresh herbs, and the sound of crickets grew still. I breathed and felt the earth beneath me so full of life. We walked for a time in some blessed realm. And my heart was full to the brim.

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Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
In Praise of Festival Romances

As summer festival season begins in the Pagan Northern Hemisphere, I sing in praise of Festival culture's magical child, the Festival Romance.

Festivals are magical, places of discovery: hotbeds of intensive growth, where Pagan Modernity recreates itself.

In so charged an atmosphere, people meet. How can they help but fall in love?

Here, in a place where time runs differently, how should a love not run its entire course—birth, consummation, and death—all in a few shining days?

There's love and love, as there's life and life. Life in the temporary pagan village is good; so too is life in community at home.

So too with festival romances. Some fruit into ongoing partnerships. Most don't, but there's no shame in that. A flower is no less beautiful because it bears no fruit.

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Snake Spirits: Health and Wealth

"Snake, snake, come swiftly 
Hither come, thou tiny thing,
Thou shalt have thy crumbs of bread,
Thou shalt refresh thyself with milk."

-The Brothers Grimm, “Stories About Snakes: First Story”

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Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Bible's Most Famous Witch

She's by far the most famous witch in the Bible.

So, the king is in a bind.

He has prohibited all forms of divination on pain of death, but now he needs someone to divine for him. The kingdom next door is about to invade, his long-time counselor is dead, and he needs advice.

“Find me a witch (ba'alat 'ov),” he tells his servants.

“There's one at Endor ('Eyn Dor, 'Spring [of] Dor*'),” they tell him.

So he disguises himself and goes to see her.

“Raise someone for me,” he tells her.

“What, are you trying to trap me?” she replies, cannily. “You know the king has forbidden such things.”

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Mariah Sheehy
    Mariah Sheehy says #
    I remember asking *why* all these various arts were forbidden in Sunday school, and why if we believed in religious tolerance/free
  • Mike W
    Mike W says #
    I love it Steve. I guess that Maurice from Bewitched and Nicky Holroyd from Bell, Book and Candle were powerful media role models
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I once read an article in which the author tried to identify the different types of magic in the ancient near east. It has been a
  • Jet
    Jet says #
    Very well said. I love your sense of humor. That being said: I enjoy learning where the name of the witch Endora came from. I had
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Thanks, Aunt Vyv. The trendy, jet-setting witches of Bewitched were indeed a revelation. And, one could say, a prediction. A dear
Pagan Feng Shui for Peace of Mind

We live in anxiety-producing times. Of that, there is no doubt. What can you do about it, hug a crystal? Actually, it may be an excellent idea as crystals can bring calm. Come to think if it I might need to surround myself with turquoise for the grounding and centering I need right now.  Stones placed in strategic places around your home can help accelerate the change you desire in your home and in your life, Using what I call “crystal feng shui,” you can place a crystal or a geode in the appropriate position of your home to facilitate specific results. For example, amethyst will promote healing and release any negative energy that is clinging on.  Clusters of jade or yellow “lemon quartz” will activate vibrations of abundance and creativity.

 

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Last modified on

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Approaching Our Fears

Cross-posted on Goddessing From the Heart.

For today’s #InnerWork post, I will be uncovering some of the psychology behind “facing your fears” and discussing how we can incorporate Goddess Spirituality into this experience. The topic is timely for me as I will be getting MRI testing in the next few weeks and am concerned about how it will go for me. I saw the machine in person and have been feeling anxious imagining myself undergoing the process.

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Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Fortune, Empress of the World

The stately magnificence of the hymn to Fortune (Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi: “Fortune, Empress of the World”) with which Carl Orff's 1935-6 pagan oratorio, Cármina Burana, both begins and ends, either belies, or comments ironically, on the over-the-top quality of the lyrics.

In this not-very-literal rendering, I've attempted to forefront this tone of self-parody. The speaker is a poet who's down on his luck, and in response hits back with both fists.

For all the good it does.

 

O Dame Fortune

 

O Dame Fortune, Queen

of it all: like the Moon

you wax and wane,

always in flux.

Last modified on

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