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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
More on the God Who Hears

In Which The Youngest Warlock Questions the Oldest.

What do you say to the Horned when you pray?

I listen.

And what does the Horned say to you?

He listens.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Every Old Warlock Has a Cane

Seems like every old warlock has a cane.

They say that old Tom Weir (1599-1670) used to send his down to the corner store—by itself!—to pick up orders for him. The Devil gave it to him at his oathing in place of a familiar, reasoning that this would, for a townsman, be less conspicuous than a live animal.

So, Tom, while we're talking conspicuous....

Weir's infamous warlock's cane was carved from blackthorn, with a satyr's head for a handle. It burned along with its master on Colton Hill in Edinboro, “twisting like a serpent” in the flames. This was taken as affirmation of its diabolical origin.

Well, now.

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Pagan News Beagle: Faithful Friday, May 13

The religious icons of motherhood are celebrated. The unique nature of American Buddhism is examined. And seven principles of interfaith communication and cooperation are described. It's Faithful Friday, our weekly segment on news about faiths and religious communities around the world! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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A Word from Crystal Guide, Venus, on Charging Crystals

This is a question a person asked about charging. I have posted Venus's reply before, but here it is with less Genn, more Venus. First, the question:

What do I need to do to charge or recharge my crystals? Do I need to put them in the sun...which is kind of hard where I live because I am gone most of the day & I do not leave my drapes open while I am gone.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Oak Flowers

What is harder and more enduring than oak?

What is more delicate and ephemeral than a flower?

Oak flowers: a seeming paradox, but all those acorns must come from somewhere. The contradictory softness of the hard. The oak being Thunder's tree and all, one thinks of all those stories in mythology in which the Thunderer, most manly of gods, dresses in women's clothing. Clearly, he's not all bluster and bravado. Clearly, he too has his hidden depths.

Welcome to the season of paradox: the blooming of the oaks. You may need to expand your mental picture of what a flower looks like. But flowers they are, male and female, and they bear within themselves the oaks of millennia yet to be.

While visiting my cousin in Germany, I picked up some jars of oak honey at the village shop. It was amazing, the least sweet honey I've ever tasted, dark upon the tongue.

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Pagan News Beagle: Earthy Thursday, May 12

Concerns rise about oxygen depletion in the world's oceans. A mysterious and weird animal from the distant past is identified. And what exactly does "natural food" mean? It's Earthy Thursday, our weekly segment on science and Earth-related news! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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To understand Celtic literature and the parts of that literature that may represent Celtic mythology, we must have at least a basic understanding of who the Ancient Celts were (and along the way, clear up some misconceptions that are quite prevalent in popular culture these days). First, we must emphatically state that there is not a Celtic 'race' - this is a mistaken concept promoted by the Victorians (or earlier), passed along through early 20th century writings, and still (sadly) used by some hate groups today. Being 'Celtic' has more to do with language and culture, than it has to do with DNA.

This is not to say that people today are not descended from the Celts (they are!) or that someone does not have Irish ancestry when their grandmother is Irish (they do!). There is not a lone genetic marker for being 'Celtic' (although some interesting patterns emerged over the millenia) - and much of the genetic research shows that in many regions we associate with Celtic culture, the primary genetic makeup of the people who live there is the same as those who lived there before Celtic culture arrived or emerged. This is not true everywhere, but it does show that for various reasons the people who were already living in these European regions adopted Celtic language and culture.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Síthearan NicLeòid
    Síthearan NicLeòid says #
    Hello there and thanks for this great question. I too reject his theories - it's possible some details were accentuated in medieva
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ms. NicLeoid, How do you feel about the theories of British archeologist Francis Pryor? Do you share his belief that the Anglo-Sa

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