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PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
At the crossroads

There are a heap load of folk songs that tell us the devil resides at the crossroads but we don’t really need to worry about him…what we are more interested in is the belief that the crossing of two roads is a powerful spot.  The crossroads is the centre of the four winds and the four directions.  The centre point links the two worlds, that of the living and the dead – it is an ‘in between’ place.   In some traditions you would go to the crossroads at midnight to meet Eshu/Elegba and in others it is the place sacred to the sun god Ra and the godsBhairava, Hermes and Mercury and the goddess Hecate.  The crossroads is also a place where Hoodoo tricks take place and where spells can be buried to ‘do their thing’.   

You may find in your local woods or even parks that there is a place where two dirt tracks cross or even where a bridge goes directly over a straight run of river or stream.  That centre spot is an excellent place to work magic.  It is also a good place to dispose of magic tricks and workings after you have finished with them including candle stubs.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Sacred River of the Witches

If you look at a map of England, you'll see on the southwestern side of the island, between Cornwall and Wales, a large waterway reaching inland from the Atlantic. This is the Estuary (in Witch, it would be “Firth”) of the River Severn.

The Severn, Britain's longest river, is traditionally considered a “female” river, its patron deity a goddess.

In its valley and throughout its watershed there dwelt, some 1300 years ago, the Anglo-Saxon tribe known as the Hwicce, from whom, some would say, derive the witches of today. And indeed, plenty of witches still live along the Lady Severn, though most of us now live elsewhere.

In any given landscape, the names of the largest rivers will always give access to the oldest reachable underlying linguistic substratum. (Think of the Mississippi, Ojibwe for “Big River.”) And so it is for the Severn.

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Good Witch vs. Bad Witch: Bad Shaman
"Dear Good Witch/Bad Witch:

My mother has a friend who invited a so-called Native American shaman to
live with her a little over a year ago. Everything was fine for a while,
but then weird things started to happen involving spirits in her home.

My mother's friend was also becoming very interested in witchcraft, spell
work,and rituals. She was starting to attract all sorts of people into her
life, and many of them were either frauds or didn't know what they were doing.

Then scary things started to happen with the "shaman" and we found out
that he wasn't a good person. He was doing things like invading people's
dreams, conjuring and trapping spirits, and generally causing bad things to happen
to those he was around. Then we found out that he wasn't really a shaman
or a Native American, and that he was in actuality a modern day
necromancer. Eventually, my mother's friend kicked him out of the house
but now he's dating her sister, who is completely infatuated with the man
-- at least when he's around. (When he's gone she complains about him
behind his back.)

I've tried to help my mother's friend through a house cleansing and a
witch's ball, and that seemed to help but now I'm at a loss about what I
can do to stop this guy from doing any more harm.

What should I do?"
Jessie from Jonesboro

Good Witch says:

Wow, Jessie. Jerry Springer couldn’t come up with a situation as bonkers as this one, even in his wildest and most fevered dreams. But I’m going to take this improbable-but-not-impossible question at face value because I’ve had experience with plastic shamans and the havoc they wreak.

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Pagan News Beagle: Fiery Tuesday, July 26

Family accused of killing a witch in South Africa are sentenced to 102 years in prison. The controversial new President of the Philippines agrees to a ceasefire with communist militants. And religious conservatives declare that "God might not want a woman for President." It's Fiery Tuesday, our weekly segment on political and societal news from around the world! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Time of the Mother

We call it Lammas or Lunasa, and think of it as marking the commencement of the grain harvest.

And so indeed it does. In Western Minnesota, they're beginning the cutting of the “small grains” even as you read this.

But here in the New World, this was a festival long before the ships from Europe arrived with their sacks of seed wheat and barley.

“Green Corn,” they called it, and among many peoples, it was the greatest feasting of the year.

Maize cultivation came into Northern America from Mexico about 2000 years ago, and spread up along the river valleys. In the Upper Mississippi Valley, where I live, they've kept Green Corn for almost 1000 years now.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Yep. There's Betty Windsor up there on the right. Pagan holiday stamps: may we live to see them.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Love that postage stamp at the top of the page. I'm guessing it's English.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Strength may be the most misunderstood of the Goddess’ virtues.  She advises us to be strong, but the tricky part is what exactly is strength, and how can it be used appropriately instead of abusively?

“There are two ways of exerting one’s strength: one is by pushing down, the other is pulling up.”

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Polytheistically Speaking

I didn't realize that I was speaking polytheistically until I'd already said it.

“How it is out there?” asked the clerk, as she rang up my bottle of water and bag of ice.

I shook my head. “They say it's going to get worse.”

Conversations of this banality this go on between strangers in the Midwest every day, especially when it's hot and muggy.

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