PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Columbine/Aquilegia magic

Columbine/Aquilegia

(Aquilegia Canadensis, Aquilegia vulgaris)

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Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Remembering Beech Buchanan

Contains material some readers may consider inappropriate for discussion in a public forum.

 

Thank Goddess, it's that time of year again.

Planting Time.

Time to frig in the fields to make the crops grow.

Gentlemen, don't forget: onto the ground.

That's just how these things are done.

 

Of course, such love isn't just for Planting Time, harvest, or taking seisin (buying land).

It's also for funerals.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Broomstick Ghetto

 “Bast, you need to get out more and read some history that doesn't have witches in it.”

 

I live in the Broomstick Ghetto.

Now, some may think: Posch, you need to get out more. You're living in a fantasy.

Well, I disagree.

Denunciations of “retribalization” routinely miss a salient point.

People want a tribe. People need a tribe. People are looking for a tribe of their own to be part of.

And some of us are lucky enough already to have one.

Last modified on
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Local historians generally date the start of Paganistan from Beltane 1976, when Minnesota Church of the Wicca held their first May
  • Chris Sherbak
    Chris Sherbak says #
    Amen. (Omen?) I've always been jealous of what you all had up there since, oh, I dunno, 1980?

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Dividing the Minoan World

We divide our world into all sorts of segments based on time and space: day and night; the four seasons; the ground, the air, and space. Organizing the world into understandable parts is a natural human inclination, and the Minoans did it, just like everyone else. So how did they divide their world?

I have a few ideas. The most obvious is the seasons. Crete lies in the sea just south of Greece and has a Mediterranean climate. That means that, instead of the spring-summer-autumn-winter cadence we're used to in most of North America and Europe, the year flows from the rainy season to the dry season and back again: only two major seasonal divisions. In Mediterranean climates, the dry season lasts from what we might call late spring, through summer, and into early autumn. On Crete, plant life turns crispy-brown and dry. All but the largest creeks dry up, and even the rivers diminish to a flow much smaller than their wet season. This is the dead time of year, the counterpart to winter in the northern temperate zone.

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CRYSTALS AND SIZE - IS BIGGER REALLY BETTER?

I've had this question more than once, so thought I would address it here... What do you do when you buy a crystal online, but when it arrives, it is much smaller than you expected? Will it still work?

Obviously if you are looking for a crystal for jewelry or to fit in a certain place (say a desk or coffee table), size might matter. In this way, convenience and use play a part in the question of size. But, energetically speaking, is bigger really better? Does a large point put out more energy than a small point?

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Was There a "Golden Age" before Patriarchy and War?

Marija Gimbutas coined the term “Old Europe” c.6500-3500 BCE to describe peaceful, sedentary, artistic, matrifocal, matrilineal and probably matrilocal agricultural societies that worshipped the Goddess as the power of birth, death, and regeneration in all of life. Gimbutas argued that Old Europe was overthrown by Indo-European speaking invaders who began to enter Europe from the steppes north of the Black Sea beginning about 4400 BCE.  The Indo-Europeans were patrilineal and patriarchal, mobile and warlike, having domesticated the horse, were not highly artistic and worshiped the shining Gods of the sky reflected in their bronze weapons.

In the fields of classics and archaeology, Gimbutas’s work is often dismissed as nothing more than a fantasy of a “golden age.” In contrast, scholars of Indo-European languages, Gimbutas’s original specialty, are much more likely to accept the general outlines of her hypothesis. The German linguist and cultural scientist Harald Haarmann is one of them.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Nothing is Ever Forgotten

 “Nothing's forgotten. Nothing is ever forgotten.”

(Robin of Sherwood)

“New ink,” I say.

It's the annual Beltane cookout, something of a family reunion here in local Pagandom. Catching up with a friend, I notice two staves of ogham on his forearm.

I can read nine different alphabets, including Phoenician, but (alas) my ogham is rusty.

He helps me out.

“'Nothing's forgotten. Nothing is ever forgotten.'”

I know the quotation, of course. It's the tag line from Robin of Sherwood, the BBC's overtly pagan iteration of the Robin Hood mythos, the 1980s series that brought Herne back to Sherwood.

“It's for N,” he tells me, naming a beloved and much-missed local priestess, now with the ancestors.

It's a fitting tribute. She loved the series well, and in fact came into the Craft because of it. (Discussing it with a friend at work one day, she happened to remark: “...but what's with the guy with the antlers?” “Ah,” said her co-worker, “I think I can help you out there.”)

Our conversation continues, but through the days that follow, I find myself thinking again and again of those words, the words of (among others) Herne.

Nothing's forgotten. Nothing is ever forgotten.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    +1 for the ROS reference. That show rocked. By the way, I very much agree with your comments.

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