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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Trouble with Lammas

Lammas < Old English hlæfmæsse, “loaf mass.”

“A harvest festival formerly held in England on August 1 when bread baked from the season's first ripe grain was consecrated.”

Blessing the harvest's first grain: something we've probably been doing since the end of the last Ice Age.

But (etymologically speaking, anyway) the name is inescapably Christian. What to do?

Well, there's always Lúnasa. (That's the simplified Modern Irish form of the feast known in Old Irish as Lughnasadh [and by many other spellings]).

But that name has problems of its own. For one, it's specific to a specific culture and a specific pantheon. For another, for English-speakers, it is and always will be a foreign import.

Some Old Craft folks that I know wouldn't be caught dead using a Pagan Revival term like Lúnasa. In the old days, under the radar was the only safe way to fly. Where they come from, it's Lammas all the way.

Here's one you probably haven't heard before: the Gule of August. We get Gule (rhymes with Yule, which is nice) from French, although there's a Welsh form (Gwyll) too; its ultimate origin may be Latin vigilia, “vigil.” Well, in the Wonderful World of Polytheism more is generally better; “Gule” is fine if you want to mystify your friends.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Mariah Sheehy
    Mariah Sheehy says #
    This Gaelic polytheist/Druid/ is glad the pan-Pagan Celtic trend seems to be waning a bit. I'm happy to share Lunasa with anyone
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    So, your down home famtrad would have home made bread, preferably from home grown grain. The making of corn dollies, especially th
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Please, please, please, O gods: Please may every dish on the Lammas table not have zucchini in it. So mote it be!
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Thanks Tasha, I love "Word to the Wise." Happy Lammas.
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Wonderful, Steve, as always. Thanks! Sharing on Macha's FB page.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Elder and harebell

Lammas, Lugnasadh, the celebration of the grain harvest is a few days behind us. However, not all plant life corresponds with the grain, there are many things out there in the UK at different points in their life cycles right now so I thought I’d talk about those to offer some alternative takes on the wheel of the year for this month.

Lammas rituals often encourage us to focus on personal harvests and bounty, but there’s nothing in nature that says it is natural to be at the harvest stage at specifically this point in the year. If your life is not aligning you to the grain harvest, look around to see what you do connect with.

...
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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Nimue Brown
    Nimue Brown says #
    watermelons are a bit of an expensive treat here, I am imagining what an abundance would be like... :-)
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    Watermelon is one of the few garden crops that I don't get tired of, even when everyone has too many and is giving them away. Othe
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    I live in the American South, and we've always done our own twist on Lammas. Early August is indeed harvest season here, but not f
Fix Your Situation: Practical Glamour

So, generally speaking, right now would be an excellent example about how you should do what I say, not as I do.  Full time job, Jow's about to start nursing school, my book drops in six days, my cat literally just died . . .this would usually be where my house is a mess, my hair is unwashed, I'm eating like a garbage animal, watching crazy amounts of reality tv and the gym is a distant memory.

...
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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Imbolc and Lughnasadh Devotionals

Imbolc Devotional to the Rising Sun and the Earth Mother

Offering: A cup of warm tea

...
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Moon Bowl

The Moon-horns low as the full Moon clears the cattail thicket at lake's edge.

From among the standing reeds, three women emerge, arms around waists.

Their white skirts are identical, but their breasts are bare: the high breasts of youth, the round breasts of maturity, the long breasts of age.

The Young and the Old raise their outer arms.

Between them, She of the Round Breasts bears a silver bowl.

She speaks.

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A Time to Plant, a Time to Harvest

It seems like summer just arrived and already it is on its way out. Today is Lughnasadh (Celtic) or Lammas (Germanic), the beginning of the harvest season in Western European tradition and the first day of autumn according to reckonings that count summer as starting from May. Traditionally, it’s a time for working the fields and baking the first bread of the new harvest.

As always we’ve gathered all of our related posts as well as those we found across the internet that we thought you might enjoy. Have fun!

--Aryós Héngwis

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Christopher Ward
    Christopher Ward says #
    Shared thank you fer sharin Miss Karen awesome post

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Reborn to the People

What do you say when someone dies?

I've been rereading Marvin Kaye and Parke Godwin's monumental The Masters of Solitude, a landmark of 20th century witch fiction. It's set 1000 years in the future, and eastern North America is largely populated by various witch tribes.

Among them, when someone dies, you express the wish—or is it a prayer?—that he (or she) be reborn to the tribe.

Reborn to the Shando. Reborn to the Suffec. Reborn to the Karli.

It's a deep witch longing: if I'm to be reborn, let it be among my own.

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