PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Sacrifice: The Ritual

Animal sacrifice having been one of the primary expressions of public worship in the old days, the ancestors took it pretty much for granted, and as a result, there are, rather surprisingly, no step-by-step descriptions in the surviving literature of how sacrifices were actually performed.

So here's the entire ritual, as reconstructed by Classicist Ken Dowden in his 2000 book European Paganism: The Realities of Cult from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (174).

Just in time for Pantheacon.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Whenever I read of sacrificial animals I start thinking community barbecue. From what I've read in archaeology the shift to grain
QUARTZ CRYSTAL WORKSHOP April 13-16, 2018 Fayetteville, AR

Here's a two month heads-up so you can start planning your trip to Arkansas!

Join me in Fayetteville, Arkansas at the Ozark Research Institute's Dowsing & Alternative Healing Convention this April. There will be speakers all weekend and a vendor's area with all sorts of awesome offerings. I'll be doing crystal readings and will have crystals and books available. What am I covering in my workshop?

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Kehinde Wiley, Barack Obama, Art History, Race, and Gender

X-Posted to my art blog, mythandwonder.com

 

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Eros's Symposium

It all began with a discussion among some friends about Plato.  We were talking about our favorite books, and it turned out that we all really loved the Symposium.  (Yes, my friends and I are all dorks.  You know you're jealous!)  And so, by the end of the evening, the invitations went out:

"In the 4th century BC, Plato wrote one of the most influential works of all time: the Symposium. A series of speeches to Eros, god of Erotic Love, this work has shaped, if not directly influences, almost all of what we westerners think about love and romance.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Unsympathetic Magic

I made a mistake yesterday.

More than halfway through [winter], I thought, and I haven't lost a glove yet.

Ha.

So today—of course—I lost a glove.

Let them talk about sympathetic magic.

Everyone knows that unsympathetic magic is far more powerful.

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  • Alvina
    Alvina says #
    The agnostic rabbi and one of Paganism's best ritualists, Steven Posch draws formal experience from a wide assortment of foundatio
Where Summer Lives: Recovering Pagan Sweat Traditions

Och, it's the hairy armpit of Winter.

Here in the North, Winter has a cold armpit. The lakes and streams are all frozen, and who wants to strip off in this cold anyway? Get wet and face hypothermia.

Even for those of us fortunate enough to live with central heat and hot running water (and thank Goddess for them both), bathe or shower too frequently and—in our Winter Desert air—you'll shred your own dry hide with the itching.

That's why the gods gave us saunas.

The sweats that I've attended at festivals have all been structured along Native American—in fact, Lakota—lines. There's a reason for this.

The sweat is a Circumpolar tradition. When those very first ancestral Americans entered this continent, they brought their sweat traditions along with them. Time was, pretty much every Indigenous People here had their own.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Hair on the Chest

“That'll put hair on your chest!”

It's what my father always says when the tea's too strong.

It's a standing joke. Legs aside, none of the men in my family have much body hair to speak of. If there's any Neandertal DNA left in there, it must have got diluted out a long, long time ago.

“Gee,” I quip, “You mean I'll have seventeen?”

“Quit bragging!” says my father.

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