PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Balance and the Leap Into Spring

Balance is something so many of us strive for-- we talk about ‘work-life balance’ or a balanced diet or balancing the budget. We try to find that place where all things come to rest, where all the ends meet and there is nothing lacking, nothing superfluous. A place of moderation, of poise, where struggle ends and we simply land on our toes, and are suspended, as if in thin air. Many of us strive for this place of balance and call that perfection.

                But that moment is brief and elusive, because that balance is an illusion.  The moment passes and things are no longer in balance, things no longer hang perfectly between one extreme and the other. IT evaporates so fast as we tip, towards one side or the other, back towards one extreme or the other. At the Spring Equinox, night and day are of equal length. For one brief moment, it is said that one can stand an egg on one end and it will stay there perfectly balanced…for a moment.  We stand with one foot in the Winter that’s ending, and one foot in the Spring that’s blossoming in front of our eyes. And whatever late season storm may come, every moment in Spring beings us farther away from balance, farther away from that moment of repose before big changes come.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Spring Rituals

Spring rituals mean for me that it's time to get outside and in the fields.  I've not lived on my family farm for nearly forty years but every spring when the snow melts away but we still have the ice in the breeze, I want to be on the land.

This year, I was driving to work and saw the farmers out with their huge tractors discing (not as invasive as a plow) the soil.  The gray which I relate to winter was replaced with the rich dark coffee color which means it's time to start planting.  There's a smell in the air which I have never been able to describe but it is spring.  

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Propitiations

 propitiate v. To conciliate (an offended power); appease [Latin propitiare, “make favorable, gracious”]

 

Hawaiians are making offerings to Madame Pele, Lady of Kilauea.

As well they should be.

Those of us who live in places prone to natural disasters understand that—whatever else they may be—the gods are real, active powers Out There. Who cares about the Pele Within when a geyser of molten rock has just erupted in the backyard?

Volcanoes, hurricanes, blizzards: those of us who live with these things—these beings—know that, in the end, it all comes down to relationship, and—as with all relationships—to maintain good relations takes effort.

During a recent eruption of Mt. Etna in Sicily, I heard a story about an old woman who had lived on the mountain all her life. Her village was being evacuated because it was in the direct path of the lava flow.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
A garden altar

A garden altar

Having an outdoor altar is a lovely idea and gives you a magical focal point in the garden.  You can use it to leave offerings for the Fae or to deity but also as a focal point to sit outside and meditate in front of.  It can be as simple as a flat stone or piece of wood or something grander involving wood, stones, shells and even mirrors and statues.  Make sure whatever you place on the altar with the intent of leaving it out is biodegradable and won’t harm wildlife if they decide to take a nibble (or your pets).  I like to leave natural spells on my garden altar whilst the magic works.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Rachel Patterson
    Rachel Patterson says #
    Thank you Deb :-)
  • Deb
    Deb says #
    You mentioned some great ideas for simple spells for the garden. I love my garden and keep several sacred areas throughout for si

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Rings of Power

Growing up, I was very lucky. We lived on a 200 ace farm in West Virginia. At first, I didn’t love that we were so remote but, eventually, I came to treasure the beauty of nature which I could enjoy at any time. I had an Aunt Edith, my Uncle Edison’s second wife, who mentored me. She took me under her wing and taught me many things. I make much mention of Aunt Edith in my Witch’s Brew Good Spells series and how I owe her for my small wisdom. She taught me about plants and their uses in cooking and healing. She taught me about trees and how to identify each one by bark and leaf. She taught me about the stars in the sky and the constellations, a perfect preparation for the astrology we delved into later on. Witchcraft is the most natural thing in the world- and indeed, it is all about the natural world. On woodland walks, my Aunt Edith pointed out heart’s ease, wild mint, and other herbs, which grew in the creeks bed near my home. We picked, steeped, and sipped these herbs together while she imparted her wisdom. Little did I realize that these teas were sacred potions designed to gently soothe my soul and open my mind to the wonders of witchcraft.

In those timeless afternoons, I learned that the practice is not about looking inward, but about focusing your attention on the world around you. Magic exists in every leaf, every stone, every body of water, and every being. Aunt Edith taught me that becoming attuned to the natural world is a witch’s highest calling, and achieving harmony with the cycles of nature is the key to inner peace; this much I know.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    Esp love your story about your aunt.
  • Cerridwen Greenleaf
    Cerridwen Greenleaf says #
    Thanks for, Carol. That means a lot to me. She was regarded as "eccentric" by neighbors and I love that she didn't mind that at al

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Ruminations on the Soul: Guilt and Shame

I've taken some of my group material I used as a Chaplain Fellow with my PTSD and substance abuse program veterans and modified it here as blog material. I feel the content and message of the material is universal enough that it needs to be shared, even if the context is different. I hope you enjoy.

"Well baby I've been here before
I've seen this room and I've walked this floor
I used to live alone before I knew ya
And I've seen your flag on the marble arch
And love is not a victory march
It's a cold and it's a broken Hallelujah..."

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