PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Pagan News Beagle: Airy Monday, May 16

The impact of 1990s culture on the production of Xena: Warrior Princess is remembered. The legacy of Marvel's Black Panther is examined. And a Warcraft recipe book is released in anticipation of the feature film debuting next month. It's Airy Monday, our weekly segment on magic and religion in pop culture! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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When the Last Leaf Falls - Betty's Funeral

Betty Powell was a Pagan, she made me laugh, well, not just me, she brought colour and spectacle, bewilderment and perplexity, joy and laughter to many a life. 

Betty was a Pagan, and a damned good one at that. But, two weeks ago, Betty turned her face from this world and crossed over to the edge of forever, she was 83 years old.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
More on the God Who Hears

In Which The Youngest Warlock Questions the Oldest.

What do you say to the Horned when you pray?

I listen.

And what does the Horned say to you?

He listens.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Every Old Warlock Has a Cane

Seems like every old warlock has a cane.

They say that old Tom Weir (1599-1670) used to send his down to the corner store—by itself!—to pick up orders for him. The Devil gave it to him at his oathing in place of a familiar, reasoning that this would, for a townsman, be less conspicuous than a live animal.

So, Tom, while we're talking conspicuous....

Weir's infamous warlock's cane was carved from blackthorn, with a satyr's head for a handle. It burned along with its master on Colton Hill in Edinboro, “twisting like a serpent” in the flames. This was taken as affirmation of its diabolical origin.

Well, now.

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Pagan News Beagle: Faithful Friday, May 13

The religious icons of motherhood are celebrated. The unique nature of American Buddhism is examined. And seven principles of interfaith communication and cooperation are described. It's Faithful Friday, our weekly segment on news about faiths and religious communities around the world! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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A Word from Crystal Guide, Venus, on Charging Crystals

This is a question a person asked about charging. I have posted Venus's reply before, but here it is with less Genn, more Venus. First, the question:

What do I need to do to charge or recharge my crystals? Do I need to put them in the sun...which is kind of hard where I live because I am gone most of the day & I do not leave my drapes open while I am gone.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Oak Flowers

What is harder and more enduring than oak?

What is more delicate and ephemeral than a flower?

Oak flowers: a seeming paradox, but all those acorns must come from somewhere. The contradictory softness of the hard. The oak being Thunder's tree and all, one thinks of all those stories in mythology in which the Thunderer, most manly of gods, dresses in women's clothing. Clearly, he's not all bluster and bravado. Clearly, he too has his hidden depths.

Welcome to the season of paradox: the blooming of the oaks. You may need to expand your mental picture of what a flower looks like. But flowers they are, male and female, and they bear within themselves the oaks of millennia yet to be.

While visiting my cousin in Germany, I picked up some jars of oak honey at the village shop. It was amazing, the least sweet honey I've ever tasted, dark upon the tongue.

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