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PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Reading the recently released papal letter “The Joy of Love,” I was surprised to see that it opens a “new” discussion of marriage and the family with a very old patriarchal trope from Psalm 128:

Blessed is every one who fears the Lord,

who walks in his ways!

You shall eat the fruit of the labour of your hands;

you shall be happy, and it shall go well with you.

Your wife will be like a fruitful vine

within your house . . . (see ch. 1, pp. 7-8)

Notwithstanding the “inclusive language” translating the male generic in Hebrew as “one,” there is no way around the fact that this psalm is addressed by a male God to men. It compares women to property owned and tended by men. Nor does it provide any opening to consider the blessings of same sex marriage.

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You find your inner light through silence.

Get still.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ted, Thank you so much for this. It resonates on a deeply personal level, as your writing often does.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tale of a Triple Goddess

They say that in ages of ages, Earth gave birth to Moon, her first-born daughter and other self.

The size-ratio of our planet to its moon is anomalous in the solar system. In many ways, the two look more like a binary planet than a planet and moon.

In Moon, it is said, we behold Earth's knowledge of self.

It is believed that the moon accreted from material expelled from what is now the Pacific Ocean, perhaps as the result of impact, some 4.5 billion years ago.

She then gave birth to Sea, it is said: Earth's daughter and other self, born of her longing for Moon, and imprint of her love for self and daughter.

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“I want it all”: Entering the Joy of Priesthood

* To: A.K., E.H., P.N-U, M.M. – hmw-Ntr & my friends


If you’re not Kemetic but feeling “the call” of this religion, it can be said that any aspiring Kemetic is called for two simple and important tasks:
- Maintain Maat and oppose Isfet (help keep the Universe running by maintaining the Balance and All-Things-Proper – even on a small level of your simple things and daily life)—this is not simply our duty; this is also the duty the Netjeru undertake in far grander scale.

- Commune with the Netjeru – and from simple honor, veneration and worship, driven by love and attraction to their perfection and beauty, achieve the blessed afterlife (that may come in many various forms – there are a lot of things to do in the Duat besides watching your crops in the Aaru/Hetep fields grow!) Choices for eternity are indeed very important.

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
How pop culture predicts the future

I've always been fascinated in the predictive aspects of pop culture. Recently I watched the latest season of House of Cards and found that it eerily predicted some of what was happening in the current political climate. Even the actors of the show noticed those same parallels. Such predictive aspects aren't limited to the latest T.V. shows. Jules Verne wrote about submarines before the first one was invented. In various fiction books, games, and shows you end up finding that pop culture is predictive of something that shows up in our lives down the line.

I think that what pop culture really does is orient the consciousness of people toward manifesting what it shows. So it's not even so much of a predictive function so much as it plants a seed in your mind and if that seed is planted in many many minds than it makes an imprint on the superconsciousness of humanity and from there finds its way to someone who can create it.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I enjoy superhero movies. I enjoyed the recent Batman vs. Superman movie and I'm looking forward to X-men Apocalypse and Captain
  • Taylor Ellwood
    Taylor Ellwood says #
    Interesting perspective. Certainly one wonders what would happen if we had such people in our world.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The God in the Woods

Really, those woods saved my life.

Fourteen is hard. When home and school grew too much to bear, I turned to the woods. I'd walk the paths there, and the storm within would still. And when I left the woods I knew that, no, to live was better.

At first the woods were mine and I walked them fearlessly, but only by day. By night they belonged to themselves, and I feared to go there. To carry a light would have been a profanation, and I feared to walk in the dark.

But then I learned what still can't help but seem a metaphor.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Growing up in the suburbs has its advantages, access to the wild being one of them. I was back in western PA recently visiting fam
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    When my family moved back to Richmond in '72 there were woods in back of the house. I was 13 at the time and the woods were great
Pagan News Beagle: Faithful Friday, April 15

A Jewish intellectual discusses the dilemma of protecting Jews abroad and opposing the repression of Arabs in Israel. A transgender Mormon explains why he's sticking with his faith. And members of Iran's ancient Zoroastrian faith face the challenges that come with dating outside of their religion. It's Faithful Friday, our weekly segment on news about faiths and religious communities from around the world! All this and more for the Pagan News Beagle!

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