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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
What else is missing from Minoan art?

CW: animal sacrifice, human sacrifice

When I shared last week's post about what's missing in Minoan art on social media, I got an interesting response from a fellow Pagan writer, who guessed (before reading the post) that what was missing was war and violence.

There's something to that, but it's not a simple subject.

...
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Magic Metals: Platinum

Platinum is an extremely precious metal and makes for a very special setting for gems and jewels. Careful consideration must be given to what crystals are placed into a platinum setting, as they need to have energies that can stand up to the high energy of this metal. Diamonds have a strong enough brilliance, and their power is enhanced when set in platinum. Ruby, tourmaline, sapphire, and emerald are other good choices for platinum settings.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 

 

For some Christians, apparently “God”'s pronouns are now They, Them, and Theirs.

“God Loves You As They Made You,” says the signboard in front of one neighborhood church that I drove past recently.

(Of course, eagerness to embrace the latest cultural trends has long been a strong signifier of the conceptual hollowness of so much contemporary American religion—pagan as well as Christian. Somehow, I can't help but suspect that God/They isn't going to age well.)

Divine gender has, of course, long been an issue for those poor impoverished souls who worship only one god. (Let those of us blessed with more feel no sense of smugness here, though: the question of divine “gender” is as active a theological category for thinking polytheists as it is for the thoughtful monotheist.)

In some ways, God/They could be construed as faithful to certain streams of Biblical tradition. The most common by-name for Yahwéh in the Hebrew Bible is Elohím, an undeniably plural noun (it's the anomalous plural of eloáh) usually (although not always) paired with a singular verb. The mental disconnect between the two—similar to the feeling that you get when someone says “a scissors”—is nicely paralleled by the (let's just admit it, stylistically inelegant) singular “they.”

I do wonder how God/They Christians deal with their traditional liturgical and scriptural texts. Is “God” a “They” there, too? How about Jesus? Is he also a they?

Still, it's hard to deny that God/They can't help but smack of polytheism which, while it warms the cockles of my pagan heart, must surely set the teeth of an awful lot of conservative One-God folk on edge.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I received an update from drivethrurpg about a supplement for the Runequest about a new book called "The Six Paths" about the six
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Posch, Yeah, hard pass on one scissor or one pant leg. Good point. We know that Christian conservatives get triggered by the

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Magic Metals: Bronze

Bronze is also an alloy of zinc and copper and has the same healing power as brass but with one exception—bronze is said to give greater strength of character. My favorite aspect of bronze is that it helps folks conceive of and achieve their goals.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

 

 

Three things stand out in my memory from my trip to the ancient city of Ephesus, City of the Moon.

The first, quite frankly, was the public toilet. Astoundingly, the row of side-by-side toilet seats—the ancestors were social people—looked exactly—exactly—like modern toilet seats.

But these were hand-carved from marble. Wow.

The second was the civic amphitheater. Here Saul of Tarsus—later known as “saint” Paul—was nearly lynched by an angry mob for blaspheming the city's patron goddess, the famously many-breasted Artemis (Diana) of Ephesus. Megálê hê Ártemis tôn Efesíôn! they chanted: Great is Artemis of the Ephesians!

According to the New Testament book of Acts, the mob was led by a guild of souvenir-manufacturers, cynically worried about loss of revenue. (Why do non-pagans find it so difficult to believe that we, too, might love our gods?) Unfortunately, in the end a conscientious city official intervened to save “Paul's” life.

During my visit to the theater, I had the pleasure of standing in the middle of the stage and chanting, in modern pronunciation, the chant of the ancients: Megháli i Ártemis tôn Efesíôn!

Indeed, as reputed, the acoustics were wonderful.

My third memory from the day is much more humble, but—in many ways—the most telling of all.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Mr. Posch, That story is awesome. Praise be to Artemis, Goddess of the forest and the swamplands, of the Moon and the wild plac

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

There is a red-winged blackbird
with only one foot
that comes to our bird feeder.
It balances precariously,
small stump churning the air,
as it selects its seeds.
There are flowers
on the mulberry trees
and bees in the raspberries
and we saw three
monarch butterflies
in the field
and watched an oriole
who hit the window
manage to fly again.
There is a pair of cardinals
who visit the bird feeder too,
they sit together
with their shoulders touching
and sometimes tenderly
choosing seeds and putting them
into one another's beaks
reminding me of how
I watched my great uncle's hand
softly caress
my great aunt’s back
one afternoon
at the park in the rain.
Twenty-seven years ago today,
I went on a first date
with the man I married.
It was a last first date
for both of us
and here we are now,
watching those two cardinals
feed each other seeds,
knowing how they feel.
These things
give me hope.

b2ap3_thumbnail_pink-meditation-goddess-in-the-tulips-in-Virginia.jpg

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Molly, That's beautiful. It would have been perfect inside your anniversary card for your husband! (If you do cards...we do.) An
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    Thank you! And, yes, I do think it might have some magical powers!
  • Deborah Quartz
    Deborah Quartz says #
    Beautiful powerful words this poem holds for me, evoking my own long lost memories, and recent pleasures too. A few days ago I wa
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    Aww! Thank you for sharing.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Magic Metals: Brass

Brass is the result of combining copper and zinc. You may be surprised to learn that brass has been used successfully to treat hair loss! Healers favor it as a detoxifier and cleanser for people who have too much metal in their bloodstreams. Brass is also a strengthening alloy for the body and supports gems and crystals in their energies and abilities to interact in a positive way with your body. The iron content in the brass is what makes it a real stabilizer. The healing and protective powers of brass are enhanced if it is worn as a brooch in the shape of a dog, falcon, or snake. 

Brass is a wealth attractor and has often been used as a shiny substitute for the much more costly gold. The ancients loved placing their gems in brass for the way it made the beautiful colors really stand out.

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