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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
In Praise of 'Rosemary's Baby'

"Anything they say about us becomes ours, to do with as we please."

(C. F. Moore)

 

If (like me) you're one of those who has read pretty much everything that there is to read on the subject of witches, let me ask you: what do you think of J. R. Hanslet's 1933 All of Them Witches?

Isn't it a classic? Beautiful writing, good research, and—best of all—all that hot, hot information on what the Craft looked and felt like back BW (Before Wicca).

If you've got a copy (that beautifully-crafted J. Waghorn edition, with the real gold lettering and the black goatskin binding), hold onto it. It's never been reprinted, and (if you can find one), it will go for more than $1300.

Ha! Gotcha! If you think that you've read Hanslet's magnum opus, apparently you're one of those witches (gods know there are plenty of us out there) who can't admit that there's anything Craft-related that she doesn't know. Call it the Granny Weatherwax Syndrome.

In fact, you can't have read J. R. Hanslet's All of Them Witches because there is no such book. It's straight out of Ira Levin's brilliant 1967 witchsploitation novel Rosemary's Baby. Remember? It's the book that Hutch leaves to Rosemary that enables her to figure out that her neighbors (the ones who brought over the black candles during the big power outage) are actually witches and are planning to sacrifice her baby to Satan.

Or so she thinks.

“It's a religion,” she tells her husband (but it turns out he's a witch too). “It's an early religion that got—pushed into the corner” (177).

Personally, I think Rosemary's Baby is required reading for every modern witch: a little black gem of a novel, beautifully structured, with lots of twists and a delicious hermeneutic of suspicion. Don't trust anyone: they're all of them witches.

And, I mean. When, in the closing scene, Roman Castevet ( Steven Marcato) cries out: “He shall overthrow the mighty and lay waste their temples! He shall redeem the despised and wreak vengeance in the name of the burned and the tortured!” (236). Well, really, how can you help but chime in with a Hail Satan! or two, regardless of whether you actually believe in him or not?

Whenever I'm drawing up a bibliography on the Craft that lists enough books to make it inconspicuous, I almost always slip J. R. Hanslet's All of Them Witches in amongst the others. For those in the know, it'll read as a joke. For those that aren't, well...let 'em wonder. The god of witches—Old Wagtail Himself—is a notorious Trickster, and we, his children, are like him.

Because, best of all, Rosemary's Baby is a true story. That bit about the Horned siring children on mortal women: it's all true. In fact, my dear brother or sister in the Craft, he sired you.

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Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Cover Art Reveal for New Asatru Book

I'm excited to reveal the cover art and title for my upcoming book! Asatru: A Beginner's Guide to the Heathen Path is coming Spring 2020 from Red Wheel / Weiser.

The more I look at this art, the more I like it. I don't know who the artist is, but they must know a lot about magical symbolism.

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Witchy Money Magic With Crystals

The stunning, apple-green form of chalcedony gets the bright color from the nickel it contains.  Put this in your money corner for abundance and prosperity. The color and clarity give chrysoprase its power to impart good cheer, good luck, and increased perception. Healthwise, it aids your  eyes and opens your  third eye, powering your perception and awakening dormant talents. Chrysoprase is like a battery; it stores energy. It dispels anxiety by reducing fear and also opening the mind to new patterns. Chrysoprase can be a source of calm for you during times of uncomfortable change. This is a crystal to keep in a dream bag beneath your pillow to help with relaxation, promote restful sleep, and gain new insights. Beneficial for the heart chakra, this money-colored stone will create an atmosphere of encouragement, a wonderful gift to yourself.  Keep a dream journal on your nightstand and write your ideas for business and acquiring wealth as they come to you.

 Gems  and crystals are not only lovely to look upon, they are are powerful tools that can pave the way for a better life for you. Gems, stones, and crystals have long been used as amulets, symbols, charms, and jewelry in magic. These magical  stones can really enrich your life in so many ways. how to charge the stones you already own with supernatural power.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Shine Bright! Leo New Moon

Leo New Moon Reading by Kathy Crabbe

Close your eyes.
Take a deep breath
And go within.
Where all the good, juicy stuff is.

Leo Energy asks us to step up to the plate and play - SHINE time!

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
A Ballad for a Summer Day

All on a Summer's Day

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The Practical Witch’s Herbal Healing Almanac

Plants carry potent energy you can use to amplify your magical workings. Use the signs of the sun, moon and stars to your advantage and, over time, you will come to know which ones are most effective for you. Make sure to use your own astrological chart in working with these herbs.  Here is a guide to the astrological associations of plants you may grow in your kitchen garden or keep dried in your pantry:

 Aries, ruled by Mars: carnation, cedar, clove, cumin, fennel, juniper, peppermint and pine

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

There is nothing tidy here
life is too broad and billowingb2ap3_thumbnail_67121748_2382169271995281_35922234585382912_o.jpg
to be contained,
restrained,
confined,
constrained
by lists and wishes
and well-laid plans,
or even by thin and bloodless prayers.
There is nothing tidy here,
expect wild winds and sharp teeth
amid the violets and sunrises.
There is nothing tidy here,
the world a great jumble
of twining grapevine,
sprawling brambles,
winding roots,
and beating hearts.
There is nothing to do
with such an untidy world,
but whirl with the wonder of it all,
keeping your hand outstretched
to touch everything,
even if your feet bleed
and your skin is streaked
with sorrow and joy. 

Last weekend, I was thinking about how to conclude the book I am writing, how to finish it, how to know it is done, how to wrap it up tidily, with some kind of moral or lesson for living, some kind of final conclusion of "figuring it all out." In the quiet moments as I questioned, walking around in circles on my back deck, I received a reply that then became a poem: there is nothing tidy here.

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