PaganSquare


PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

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Alfablot: Honoring the Spirits of the Earth and the Dead

“‘Do not come any farther in, wretched fellow’, said the woman; ‘I fear the wrath of Óðinn; we are heathen.’ The disagreeable female, who drove me away like a wolf without hesitation, said they were holding a sacrifice to the elves inside her farmhouse.” (“Austrfararvísur”)

Feast of Spirits

The Alfablot is an ancient Norse holiday celebrated around this time of year, the end of the harvest and the start of the winter season. As for many other peoples across the world, offerings to the spirits were in order during seasonal shifts, especially when advancing into the most challenging season.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Having read Journey to Ixilan by Castaneda and Supernatural by Graham Hancock I am inclined to view the Elves as primarily the spi
Introduction of Correspondences for The Elements and Animals

 In their daily lives, animals are closely aligned with the elements. Based on their elemental correspondences, animals will often act as caretakers of that element. For example, the sandgrouse has a net of filaments on his upper body. After he returns from soaking at the water hole, his chicks drink from the water stored in his net. One could think of the sandgrouse as a guardian of water. This desert bird could be called upon for water magic in arid areas. (Since the elements correspond to the directions, an animal could be asked to guard a particular direction, as well.)  

For the next series of posts, I will be offering suggestions for the pairing of various animals with the elements. This is to give people an idea of how to go about doing this for themselves. I will first list the mammals, since many people have an affinity with them. In other postings, I will continue with birds, reptiles, and insects.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
People of No Honor

In Ireland of old, there was a practice known as “fasting on” someone, and this was the way of it.

If someone had wronged you, you would sit at his or her doorstep, and keep a fast. There you would sit, if needful, to the death.

This was accounted by the ancestors as a powerful tool of persuasion and justice, even against kings.

For Hospitality is chief of virtues, and it were accounted a grave breach of it, that an unarmed stranger should die of famine at one's very doorstep, and the shame of it upon the house forever.

Nor might one take up violence against the faster, for this also was held a grave dishonor to the house.

But in these days there is neither sitting-out nor fasting-on.

For those that rule are accounted by all as people of no hospitality, as people of no honor.

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  • Murphy Pizza
    Murphy Pizza says #
    I'll look into that...thanks!
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Let me just add that the single best treatment of a virtue-based pagan ethics that I know of in the Literature is the chapter on t
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    So let it be written, so let it be done.
  • Murphy Pizza
    Murphy Pizza says #
    Oh not on the Irish tradition...I know of that.. ..I mean write more on what it means for us in the community to be hospitable an
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I was writing from memory, Murphy; I'll see if I can pull together some sources for you. Meanwhile, for a paradigmatic example of

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
A carpet of leaves

For anyone who sees trees as part of their spiritual landscape, it’s important to think about trees specifically and not generically. It can be tempting to approach any aspect of nature as an archetype or an idea, but that means we can end up engaging with our ideas about nature, and not what’s really going on around us.

The process of deciduous trees losing their leaves is a slow one if you track it carefully, and this year I am tracking it carefully. I observed the first significant changes of colour in leaves a couple of weeks ago. Clearly different species of trees turn and shed at a different rate while the weather conditions and temperature affects how long leaves stay on trees. From what I recall of previous years, I think it likely that oak will be the last to go, while horse chestnut turned first and ash followed.

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Herbal Energy Cleanser: Clearing Vibrational Clutter

 I don’t know about you but I need to do a major energetic decluttering, Turning on the cables news and bringing in The New York Times and other news sources is surely bringing in chaos, upset and bad vibes. Time to clean out the psychic clutter and low energy that comes with it. In order to do any ritual work, you must clear anything that can create blocks. Banish the old, bad energy from your house by following this spell. Make a tea from one part dried sage, one part dried lavender and one part dried mint. Draw fresh water and boil, and then steep a teaspoon of each herb for five minutes. Once it cools, dip your finger in the tea and sprinkle it throughout your home. If you feel the need to clear out any remaining cloud of psychic clutter, add diluted lavender mint tea water to your cleanser when you wash floors or surfaces. Make your energy-clearing tea by bringing 4 cups of water to a full rolling boil; remove from heat and add in 4 sprigs of fresh lavender and 4 sprigs of fresh mint. If it is winter and there is no access to the fresh herbs, one tablespoon each of dried lavender and dried mint will do nicely. Steep the herbal tea for at least 4 minutes and as long as ten minutes if there is a lot of energetic clutter. The scent of calm and clarity will lift the spirits of all who enter your space.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
It Takes a Shaman to Raise a Stone

Why did the standing stone climb the hill?

Well, I think we know.

Before the Bull Stone began its two-year journey from its natal rock-bed, across the coulee floor, and up-slope to its new shrine, I asked:

Will you come? Will you chance this adventure? Will you receive this adoration?

For these are the questions that must be asked.

And the Stone said: Even so.

Two years, much sweat, and the work of four days later, the Bull Stone now lies, gazing at the sky through autumn's yellow canopy, on the shoulder of Sweetwood Ridge. In spring, we will raise him and, if we do our work well, he will stand in consummation long after we are gone.

And all the while the priestess, the clan-mother, sat at the crown of the slope, singing the song of Calling.

Why did the standing stone climb the hill?

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Thanks for the link, Greybeard. The mysteries of Old, revealed on Youtube.
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    This is my favorite method for raising stones. The ancient Pagans who built Stonehenge may not have had diesel engines and hydraul
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    So mote it be.
  • Kile Martz
    Kile Martz says #
    Indeed the stone is now full of our intention and purpose. When, at last, it stands at the point of the ridge, it will hold magic
Walking the Labyrinth in Modern Minoan Paganism

The labyrinth. Everyone has heard of it. It's one of the first things people think of when I mention that my spiritual practice has a Minoan focus. They might think of the beautiful labyrinth set into the floor at Chartres cathedral, or the story of Theseus and the Minotaur, or modern projects like the Pulse Memorial in Orlando, Florida (USA).

It's interesting, then, that no one has ever found an actual labyrinth at a Minoan site. There are lots of almost-but-not-quite-labyrinth meander patterns in Minoan art. And the labyrinth does show up on Cretan coins, but not until many centuries after Minoan civilization was gone.

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