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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
The Golden Thread

“Open the door”, said the wise woman
“Come in and sit down.

For it is she of great worth
Who wears the King’s crown”.

I looked at the wizened face
For answers that long I had sought
Deep pools of star-filled eyes returned my gaze
And told of mysteries carefully taught.

Her countenance was hypnotic
And fingers deftly moved to and fro
Her body moving in rhythm
As the web from the spinning did grow.

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Posted by on in Signs & Portents
Wherein Darkness Meets Light

Greetings, fellow Witches and Pagans, and welcome to our annual marking of the time when light turns to dark. Though Samhain gets more of the attention, Mabon’s an important festival as well, marking the final gasps of summer and the beginning of the long descent into winter. It also marks the midpoint of the traditional harvest season, which begins with Lughnasadh and ends with Samhain.

As we are wont to do, we’ve gathered all of our content about this special time of the year as well as content from elsewhere we thought you’d find interesting. We hope you enjoy and wish you a merry autumnal season!

-Aryós Héngwis

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And thus, with the harvest of the fall equinox, begins a new day in blogging, following a couple of years of family needs and then a long recovery from a knee replacement, which, although successful, has been way more involved than I could have imagined. Those challenges, along with intensive (read: time-consuming) physical therapy and full-time work, have more or less sucked me dry and left me unable to keep up with this blog.

Last modified on
Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Guy Teague
    Guy Teague says #
    great article prof! and happy mabon to everyone. bb /s~

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs



Last modified on

Posted by on in Paths Blogs
Happy new year! (No, I haven't lost my mind.)

And no, I don’t have a faulty calendar. Let me explain.

The Mediterranean region is lovely: a marvelous sea surrounded by sun-kissed lands all the way around in a huge oval that reaches from the Atlantic to the Levant. But one thing this area doesn’t have is four seasons. Those of us who live in the temperate zones are so used to spring, summer, autumn, and winter that we often forget there are other climates, other seasonal cycles. The Mediterranean has a very interesting set of seasons, and this cycle had a powerful influence on Minoan religion since the island of Crete lies in the middle of the wine-dark sea.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Markos Gage
    Markos Gage says #
    Apologies, but I’m going to call this out. The Hellenic archaic new year is based on the Egyptian calendar of the rising and fall
  • Thesseli
    Thesseli says #
    The Minoans pre-dated the Hellenes by centuries. Educate yourself.
  • Markos Gage
    Markos Gage says #
    I’m well aware of that, thank you. I used Hellenic as a descriptor for the land and associated cultures. I never said the that the
  • Markos Gage
    Markos Gage says #
    Actually the chapter is 2. I misread my Roman numerals
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    It's a pretty sure bet that they used greenery decorations as soon as the rains started, but the several-week-long celebratory sea

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Jack in the Sheaf

That Jack guy sure does seem to get around. First there was Jack in the Green (you can hear his song here), soon to be followed (to the same tune) by Jack in the Heap and Jack in the Drift.

Here's a harvest version that we usually sing later on at our Harvest Supper, after we've all had a few and the kids have gone to bed.

Earthy folk, pagans.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
I've Replaced "Mabon"  with "Harvest Home"

Yes, I am a Wiccan and I am a staunch advocate for the Wheel of the Year. I have been known to sing the praise-songs for that elegant crucible by waving my hands in the air and intoning--two Solstices, two Equinoxes and in-between there is a time to plant, a time to tend, a time to harvest, a time to rest!

Some of you have seen this explanation--I hope this hasn't been too triggering.

Last modified on

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