April's Tender Nest: Cultivating the Creative Self through connecting with Mother Earth Goddess Energy

Writings on observations and encounters with Mother Earth in our 'everyday life'.....How to draw upon our indigenous soul connection with the earth and Pagan traditions to manifest art.

Blog entries on everything from connecting with animal totems, wildcrafting and plant magick, significance/symbolism of the trees/plants in the Celtic and Aboriginal traditions to practical kitchen magick, how to harvest and use Oregon Grape', meditations/visualizations for journeying/active dreaming, and other art based 'how-to' witch-'craft' projects, for e.g. how to knit a sweater for a tree etc. ;)

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April Martin-Ko

April Martin-Ko

April Martin-Ko is a  Psychic Intuitive with Iroquois, Polish and Scottish ancestry who practices Celtic and Aboriginal Shamanism where she lives in Vancouver BC. She is a Tarot Reader following the Pagan Celtic Calendar taking part in rituals & seasonal ceremonies with other women walking Goddess paths.  She works with medicine holders from Squamish and Lakota Nations, participating in sweat lodges and ceremonies. April holds degrees in Psychology, History and Education is a Poet, Fabric Artist and Dancer. She facilitates Cultivating Creativity workshops and individual 'Life-Crafting' sessions . April also flexes her artistic Goddess muscles through Creative Space Design & Blessings for the home and work-place. Find out more about her work and read other musings on creativity and family lIfe at: aprilstendernest.blogspot.com
Wolf Medicine: Path-Finding by the Light of the Moon

As the moon comes to its half-way point tonight, waning into Scorpio, I'm reflecting on the route it has taken this last week.  This January moon is known as the Wolf Moon by several Aboriginal peoples, including the Algonquin, Cherokee and my ancestors the Haudenosaunee.

 

It was a time for introspection and preparation. Families would repair tools needed for hunting in the Spring.  It was also a time where ancestor stories and important myths were told. The Kwakwaka'wakw people of the Northwest Coast, inhabit much of North Vancouver Island, where I spent my childhood; they use this Mid-Winter time to transmit spirituality, through dance ceremonies, where they channel spirits and ancestors dancing in elaborate masks and regalia, at potlatches or feasts. These aspects remind me at this time of year, there is still a natural desire to seek cozy time at home, as well as, going within to seek guidance in the dream time.

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  • Danielle Blackwood
    Danielle Blackwood says #
    Thanks April! I especially like your description of the Hermit card. It really gave me a new perspective, especially reading abou

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
A Taste of Light at Winter Solstice

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_1157531_10152506771610400_1065926867_n_20131220-052759_1.jpg                                            This Fall I took it upon myself to do quite a bit of canning. This mostly involved jam and fruits. My step-daughter and husband were most excited about the canning of peaches, one of their favorite fruits.  After only 2 days of completing the canning process they wanted to open up the peaches and dig in. I firmly objected, "NO! The reason we canned peaches was to enjoy them in the dead of Winter, to have a 'taste' of Summer when things are dark and dismal." I promised my step-daughter we would open a jar to celebrate the return of the Sun on the Winter Solstice. As I prepare my house for Yule I am reminded of this promise and my thoughts turn to the reason why I wanted to learn about canning and food preservation.

Both my maternal and paternal grandparents grew a majority of the food they ate and I have so many fond memories of walking through orchards and gardens as a child eating fresh peas and carrots right out of the ground, my mother encouraging me to try vegetables like broad beans and kohlrabi.  I remember shelves upon shelves of jars stored in my maternal grandmother's basement, my paternal grandfathers' stacked up wine making equipment. The joy of eating canned crabapples and ice cream and trying sips of homemade wine after a Xmas feast.  As many of these practices my grandparents engaged in were passed on to them by their parents and grandparents, it is so clear to me how connected my ancestors were to the land. Because of this they were intrinsically aware of this coming 'Capricorn' time of year and the need for storing and preparing for Winter; it was essential for survival. I am very fortunate to live during a time where canning is more of a 'hobby' than a need to survive, but I also wanted to learn about it so I could feel connected to this family practice and share it with my child.  

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Direction of Memory

My husband's mission this year was to purchase a camper and spend most of our summer as vagabonds. One day before we were about to leave on a trip to Vancouver Island he drove up with with a sweet house on wheels !  We immediately started nesting what would be, our cozy new home for the next 3 weeks.

Camper packed we headed out....

Due North.

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  • Molly
    Molly says #
    Lovely! My daily woodspractice is essential to my spirituality (and to my being!) and so is art, including mandala, but I've never
  • leila
    leila says #
    Sorry, didn't mean to do multiples, button wasn't working.
  • leila
    leila says #
    Everyone, please help me pray for the Giant Sequoias, whom are being threatened by the rimfire in California. These trees are thou

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