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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Portals

I’ve often wondered about portals. Most of what I’ve read talks about places being portals. Yet what about people? Is it possible for a person to be a portal or just to be some type of attracting mechanism for spirits?

All my life I’ve experienced spirits, no matter where I lived. There was a time when this experience seemed to leave my life, but I think it was more because I was focusing and preoccupied by other events in my life.

I grew up in a very small town in NW Pennsylvania. The house we lived in had two rooms in the upstairs and a smallish attic place. When you walked up the stairs , the two rooms were on the left and the attic was a small room with a low ceiling on the right that was situated over part of the kitchen. I hated that space, there was something dark and scary there.

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  • Ashley Rae
    Ashley Rae says #
    Awesome story, I couldn't stop readings. Consider writing a memoir - I'd buy it! To address your question, as a teacher of medi
  • Paola Suarez
    Paola Suarez says #
    Loved your post Laurie. Featured it on my Goddess Spiral Health Coaching FB page: http://tinyurl.com/n4vwfah Perfect post for Sa

Last year a young man approached me at a sabbat and told me he was "of my line."  Huh?  I didn't know I had a line.  Then he told me he'd recently been initiated and one of his initiators was an initiate of one of my initiates.  My initiate had been a student of mine (and of others) for some years before any oaths were sworn. 

This incident brings up lots of questions, especially since it arises from a tradition (Reclaiming) that requires no initiation in order for people to participate as fully and completely, prominently and authoritatively (teaching, public priest/essing, et al.) as they choose.  An obvious concern in this scenario is accountability -- to students, to community, to tradition.  Another is whether, or how, one can assume a shared knowledge and capability.  Those are questions for another rumination; for now, let's stick with lines and lineage.

What do we mean by lineage?  Why is it important to us?  Or to those of us who may think it is important?  Or to anyone?

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  • Evylyn Rose
    Evylyn Rose says #
    Just wanted to share a quick, friendly message that the URL for the Ordains linked to in this article has changed and can now be f
  • Ro Reyburn
    Ro Reyburn says #
    I guess that I have to opt for a [i]functional[i] , for lack of a better word, definition. Lineage, to me, is the line of connec
  • Joseph Merlin Nichter
    Joseph Merlin Nichter says #
    Most teachers offer the answers, the wise ones simply ask the right questions. And you are asking the right questions. I think th

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

When I was a kid I remember that whenever a new person entered our lives, especially whenever one of us children brought a new friend home, my mother would ask, "Who are your people?"  This used to really bug me.  She did it in a challenging, even accusatory, way, like you had to prove yourself worthy of her attention or of being in her child's life before she'd accept you.

Now that so many years have past, and my mother is gone, I'm revising my attitude towards her question.  Who are my people?  Who are your people?  Who are our people?  

Certainly our blood relatives are "our people."  However, in today's world, at least here in the United States, families are smaller than they were in the past, and often widely dispersed in different locations.  Further, there are so many more blended families, step-families, half-siblings, co-parents, that make sorting and defining kin groups complicated. Plus, since the years following World War II American society (read 'real estate developers') began promoting the idea of isolated nuclear families, a phenomenon I consider detrimental in many ways, one being that it separates extended families from one another.

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  • Tom Terrific
    Tom Terrific says #
    I like your observations. I’ve thought a lot about spiritual community, because I’ve so longed for it and yet never found it. Gro
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Wow, Tom! Thanks for your observation. I hadn't thought of this in quite this way. I'd considered undue affluence and its effec

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