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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in dreams

Jung’s conception of the archetypes evolved over a period of a half century. In general, he tended to describe the archetypes more in biological terms (instincts, structures of the brain) in his earlier writings, and in more spiritual terms in his later writings.

saturn-goya.jpgThe Archetypes and the Parents

Jung’s conception of the archetype originated with his recognition that the personalities of the parents of a child continue to exercise a vital influence on the child, even after the parents are dead. Jung realized that the “images” of the parents survive, often in a distorted form, and continue to “lead a shadowy but nonetheless potent existence in the mind of the patient.” ("The Theory of Psychoanalysis" (1912), CW 4, P 134).  Jung called this parental image an “imago”. The imago was Jung’s first articulation of the concept of the archetype. It’s no wonder then that the mother and father archetypes were of such special importance to Jung.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

In a Wonderland they lie,
Dreaming as the days go by,
Dreaming as the summers die:

Ever drifting down the stream—
Lingering in the golden gleam—
Life, what is it but a dream?
—from “A Boat, Beneath a Sunny Sky” by Lewis Carroll

When I was a child, I had dreams. Lots of them. Run of the mill dreams, fantastical dreams, spy dreams (one of my favorites), and day dreams. There were the flying dreams, dreams where I soared over Egyptian pyramids and thick, darkly lit forests. A few times I had fun zooming around with Peter Pan. And there was one dream where I realized I was dreaming and decided to attempt things that are somewhat more difficult in waking life, such as levitating myself and various objects. While lucidly dreaming, I also decided it would be a cool idea to walk through my wall. It was cool. The grass outside was black-green and barely visible, but the night sky glittered with a few starry jewels, illuminating the tree and slope of the hill in our front yard, where my bedroom faced. I still remember some of these quite clearly and look back with fondness and sometimes yearning, particularly for the flying dreams. A certain few of my dreams, however, have left indelible marks on my life. A certain few have led me to the Goddess.

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  • Kalyca Schultz
    Kalyca Schultz says #
    Thank you, Lizann! I just saw that I missed your post ostensibly about feet (?)! As a typical Pisces, I will ramble on over now to
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Lovely - thank you. I was lucky growing up as a mystic child to have folk around who affirmed, rather than disparaged, my reality
  • Kalyca Schultz
    Kalyca Schultz says #
    Francesca, merry meet! And thank you! I would love it if anything I share here helps someone to know they are not alone, they are

In my last post, I described 5 practical steps for doing dreamwork.  In this post, I want to give you a real life example of a dreamworking I did after writing the last post.

1.  Remembering my dream

I don't usually remember my dreams.  So this night, before going to bed, I said aloud, "I will have a dream and I will remember my dream."  I then tried to think about dreaming as I went to sleep, so the last thing I would think about was dreaming.  I then unintentionally woke a half hour to an hour earlier than I normally do, with just a little bit of memory of a dream.  But as I thought what I remembered, more of the dream came back to me. 

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Thank you for sharing! It was very interesting.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_jacobs-ladder-blake-heartcurrents.jpg

"Jacob's Ladder" by William Blake

In my last post, I discussed dreamwork as a form of Jungian Pagan spiritual practice.  In this post, I want to offer some practical advice for turning dreaming into a spiritual practice.  The following comes from Anthony Stevens' Private Myths: Dreams and Dreaming and Robert Johnson's Inner Work: Using Dreams and Active Imagination for Inner Growth.

1.  Remembering Your Dreams

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  • Áine
    Áine says #
    Thanks for this, John! I always remember at least one dream from every night, and I sort of fall back into the dream I left as I f
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Thanks Áine. It's good to know others are getting something out it.
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Great stuff! I always appreciate your perspective. I've had a few "big dreams", as I'm sure that many (if not most) of us have. V

When I comprehended my darkness, a truly magnificent night

came over me and my dream plunged me into the depths of the

millennia, and from it my phoenix ascended.

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  • Laura Smith
    Laura Smith says #
    Great posting. I am a follower of Jung and Campbell in my practice as an Archetypal Dreamwork Analyst. I also blog about my own pe
  • John Halstead
    John Halstead says #
    Thanks Laura. I'll definitely come over and check out your work.
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Very interesting food for thought. Thanks again for sharing it with us!

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