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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 1 blog entry contributed to teamblogs
Pagan savings challenge, week twelve:  looking back

I called this post "looking back" because, scurrilous wag that I am, I wrote it a week later than the date it was posted.  Oh, the technology!

My week twelve savings:  $78, 15% ($12) of which I added today.

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A Dubious Balance

For most of us on the East Coast, this has been a long, wintry season to be sure. And I’m certain we are not done with weather yet, March having come in like a wee lamb. We are ready–more than ready!–for spring to arrive in the hills and the hollow places.

I follow a path that teaches me that spring arrives with the snowdrops, in the dark drear beginnings of February. I have learned that spring is still a terribly changeable beast and filled with chaos and longing. When I observe the Vernal Equinox, it will be as mid-spring–just as the Winter Solstice is mid-winter–and I will know I am halfway to Summer, at Beltane.

Most likely, I will balance an egg tomorrow, for fun. And I have a funny package ready to send to my daughter and her beau, to celebrate the season. As you can see from the photo above, the hellebores that are commonly called Lenten roses are blooming in the yard. The daffodils are blindingly yellow this year and the crocus are larger and lusher than in years past. Some things need a long cold rest to do their best work.

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  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    Thanks, wild woman.
  • Kate Laity
    Kate Laity says #
    Just the words I needed to hear today.
Encountering the Monomyth

 

Today, we begin a discussion of the hero’s journey.

The hero’s journey—also called the hero’s quest—is a profound metaphor infusing each magickal and mundane path we take throughout our lives. The writer and comparative mythologist Joseph Campbell is credited for his work in identifying the common threads winding throughout world mythology and tradition and linking these under a common idea, which he called the monomyth: the “one story.” Campbell developed this idea of the monomyth after discovering that all of the world’s great cultures tend to tell the same stories, albeit with regional variations. To folklorists and mythologists, a “myth” is a story that a culture tells about its most sacred nature and origins. Thus the monomyth captures the story of humanity, retold over and over in a number of guises.

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  • Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker
    Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker says #
    And I apologize for the typos above. Augh. Wrote this rather fast before dashing out the door-- that'll teach me!
  • Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker
    Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker says #
    Thanks, Pegi, for your comments. I am aware of "Campbell criticism"-- I'm a college English professor and a trained folklorist. On
  • Pegi Eyers
    Pegi Eyers says #
    You need to know that there is a a huge critique of the "monomyth" that has been underway for some time. Now criticized as an over
The Prodea Cookbook: Good Food and Traditions from Paganistan's Oldest Coven

You won't find any eye of newt or toe of frog in this witches' kitchen. What you will find is a collection—more than three decades in the making—of seasonal and regional foods for celebration and mindful eating from the Land of Sky Waters: Cinnamon Wild Rice Pudding, Pesto delle Streghe (“the pesto of the witches”), and what may well be the world's oldest Yule recipe.

Plus tales and wisdom from living Midwest Pagan tradition, including a breathtaking repertoire of natural dyestocks for the most beautiful Ostara eggs ever.

The Authors: Poet, scholar, and storyteller Steven Posch emigrated to Paganistan in 1979 and by sheer dint of personality (or something) has become one of the Twin Cities' foremost men-in-black. Historian and ethicist Magenta Griffith fell in love with Minnehaha Falls at first sight, and has lived nearby ever since. (And yes, the name does come from Rocky Horror.)

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Spring has Sprung: Time to Reboot!

You know how sometimes you have a problem with your computer or some other electronic gizmo, and you can fix it by simply turning it off and on, or unplugging it and plugging it back in? Don’t you wish it was that easy to reboot our own lives? I know I do. Of course, life doesn’t exactly work like that. But there are times when it is easier to give the process a jump-start, and this is one of them.

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