Root & Branch: Eclectic Folk Magic, Conjure, and Witchery for Every Day.

Discover the natural magic of the British countryside and apply its
lessons to your life, wherever you roam.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Melusine Draco

Melusine Draco

Mélusine Draco originally trained in the magical arts of traditional British Old Craft with Bob and Mériém Clay-Egerton. She has been a magical and spiritual instructor for over 20 years with Arcanum and the Temple of Khem, and writer of numerous popular books on magic and witchcraft. Her highly individualistic teaching methods and writing draws on ancient
sources, supported by academic texts and current archaeological findings.

 

 

This thought came into my head as I was looking at the cover of Traditional Witchcraft for Field and Hedgerows and since it’s been a while since the cover picture was chosen, I’d forgotten what that image represented.   The scene is a long distance shot across a field with a lone tree silhouetted against an orange sunset.  There is a mist rising from a hidden stream and we are about to enter what we know as ‘owl light’ or twilight – perhaps the most magical time of the day.

...
Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

 

Le crabe enrage protection charm

 

...
Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

 

 

Taking a break from the hurricane-lashed Glen with its river in full flood, mountains capped with snow and giant trees ripped out by their roots, I crossed the ridge behind our cottage and dipped down into Tipperary Town for a quiet lunch and a potter around the shops.  Even in the sheltered streets the wind was still strong enough to take the breath away, but having been marooned without electricity, broadband or mobile phones for four days it made a welcome change to see other people around.

...
Last modified on
3
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Melusine Draco
    Melusine Draco says #
    How great to hear from someone who was part of that famous Sunday 'school'. Unfortunately everyone seems to have lost touch since
  • Jeremy Crawford
    Jeremy Crawford says #
    I read the book "Coven of the Scales" about Aliester "Bob" Clay-Egerton and his wife, Miriem. I used to meet with them at Mark Ton

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

 

“Most of the books I read concentrate on the Goddess, and often ignore the God altogether ... I understand traditional witchcraft is more god-oriented.  Are there any easy ways of connecting with ‘Horned God’ energy?”  SBW (Ayrshire)

 

...
Last modified on
0

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

 Martha Gray, author of Grimalkyn: The Witch’s Cat, talks to prolific esoteric author, Melusine Draco, about Life, the Universe and Everything.

 Having caught up with Melusine Draco in her mountain lair, it isn’t difficult to see why the spirit of the landscape has such an impact in her writing.  As Michael Howard of The Cauldron wrote, she was an initiate of the late Bob Clay-Egerton’s traditional Coven of the Scales and has been a practicing occultist, magical teacher and writer on esoteric subjects for over twenty years.  And as fellow esoteric author, Alan Richardson, observes: “Melusine Draco, as her name suggests, has long been plugged into the powerful currents of traditional witchcraft and ritual magic. She is one of the real ones ...”  

Surprisingly, the lady herself is not the stereotypical High Priestess and is refreshingly down to earth, as the tone of her books reveals.  “I can’t be doing with all the posing and posturing and it was something that Bob [Clay-Egerton] would have quickly knocked out of us if we’d tried to adopt it.  He was a past-master at deflating monstrous egos and always went straight for the jugular if anyone showed signs of being precious.”  In fact, speaking from experience, meet her at any pagan conference or workshop and you won’t find any outward or give-away traces of witchiness at all.

...
Last modified on
1

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

“What is the best way to introduce young children and teens to the ‘witch world’ without too much emphasis on the magic/ritual side of things?”

 

Many years ago, my friend and I passed those long, hot summer days of childhood roaming the surrounding fields and hedgerows. Then, we could disappear for hours, discovering the treasures of the season and enjoying the closeness of a silent companionship. Some sixty years and hundreds of miles apart, we still share those memories of knowing where to find the first flowerings, and close encounters with birds and animals of the hedge bank.  “Do you remember …” frequently crops up in letters and telephone conversations to recall to mind some indelible memory of a bank of spring celandines; the glimpse of a hunting stoat snaking through the undergrowth near the ruined barn; Easter violets; the chatter of nesting hedge sparrows, or more correctly ‘dunnock’, who often play foster parents to the cunning cuckoo.

...
Last modified on
0
Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • gary c. e.
    gary c. e. says #
    thanks for your post here- have you ever heard the saying; "where the woodbine twineth". ?
Photo shared by on in Paths Blogs

I'm often asked which of my books are my personal favourites, and why?

The 'why' is easier to answer.  My favourites are those that have taken the longest to research and write, rather than any 'best-selling' status.  To qualify as a favourite there has to be a lot of blood, sweat and tears gone into the writing and, more importantly, the books have to stand the test of time in my own eyes.  Because I write esoteric books there has to be a large amount of magical input - some I can write off the top of my head, others require a great deal of thought and preparation, often taking on a life-force of their own.  It's the latter I find most rewarding.

Top of the list has got to be The Dictionary of Magic & Mystery (Moon Books) because it took over ten years to compile purely for my own personal use, before offering it up for publication; for much the same reason The Hollow Tree (ignotus) an elementary guide to the Tarot and Qabbalah written for my own students goes on the list.  Magic Crystals, Sacred Stones and The Atum-Re Revival (published by Axis Mundi) reflect the intermediary level of teaching within the Coven of the Scales and were both originally written as teaching manuals.  Last but certainly not least, is Traditional Witchcraft & the Pagan Revival: A magical anthropology (Moon Books) due for publication later this year, which has been carefully vetted by the editor of The Cauldron, Michael Howard, to prevent any bloomers and has also taken many years to compile.

The publication of a magical title carries a grave responsibility, simply because we (the author) are imparting magical directions for those who would follow in our footsteps.  If our directions are misleading or inaccurate this could cause serious complications for the reader; and if the author's knowledge can only take the reader so far along the Path, it could result in someone standing on the brink of the Abyss with no idea of how to proceed.  In magic, a little knowledge can be extremely dangerous, especially if it is couched in terms of expertise!

...
Last modified on
0

Additional information