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Studies Blogs

Advanced and/or academic Pagan subjects such as history, ethics, sociology, etc.

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

I want to recommend the book The Invisible Sex: Uncovering the True Roles of Women in Prehistory as a good example of critical thinking applied to an interesting area of academic study which also has implications for our lives today. Its feminist perspective is a refreshing counter to the still pervasive assumptions about sex and gender which mostly rendered women invisible. Its conclusions - and it offers more questions than conclusions - will not make Goddess worshippers stand up and cheer. But they might give us a better awareness of what we do and don't know about our own past and, what's more, better tools for addressing some issues we're struggling with today.

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Sacred Words

 


I am back to writing my blog after taking a break to take care of myself and the many lovely people in my life. My blog should be back on a weekly schedule, barring times when the priorities of my life are more pressing than an online presence. My heartfelt thanks to those that reached out to me and also to those who gave me space. I was also away at PantheaCon and will write about how it touched me next week.


 

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Elements of Identity

In my previous post, I discussed why I thought identity was an essential principle of magic and explored what magic as an ontological practice might look like. In this post, I want to unpack identity further so that we can learn what makes up identity and how we can work with it as a magical principle. Some of what I discuss below can also be found in my book Magical Identity.

Your Family is one of the foundational elements of your identity. Your mother and father, and siblings (if you have any) provide you the initial experience of the world, as well as modeling behaviors about how to interact with the world. They pass down both their functional and dysfunctional behaviors, both in terms of how they interact with you and around you. It's fair to say that your identity is shaped by them for your entire life. I'd argue that your family is one of the more influential elements of identity and one that needs to be carefully explored in order to change a lot of your own behaviors. Your family also models financial and health skills to you. Even if they never explicitly discuss finances or health, they nonetheless provide you with standards that impact how you handle both throughout your life.

Your Genetics are another element of identity. Your health is determined in part by your genetics and knowing your family's health history can help you plan accordingly. Many of the diseases we deal with seem to have a genetic component, which can also shape your identity and how you prepare to deal with those diseases. But beyond health, your genetics also plays a role in your overall appearance, which also creates a sense of identity that shapes your life. 

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
I Wear My Crown

There are a lot of things I want to write about on my recent adventure to Pantheacon. There was so much learning, connection, and transformation that I almost didn't know where to begin. That was until I realized that I should just begin where I always try to begin - at the Great Work of transforming the soul. 

My intention of going to the Con was not deep spiritual transformation. But that's what happened regardless thanks to one ritual in particular. On Saturday night I attended Rite of 1,000 Crowns, a joint ritual facilitated by CAYA Coven and The Living Temple of Diana. The intention of the rite was to invoke sovereignty by claiming the crown of the Goddess.

One by one we filed into the ballroom past a line of ringing bells and singing bowls that shaped an atmosphere of enchantment and anticipation. I knew the rite would be special as the quarters began being called, which was done by the beating of drums, the swaying of hips, and the singing of an absolutely delicious chant. Frankly, I was already in tears by that point. Looking back on that process of constructing the space I think "damn, now that's how you call some quarters!" But of course that was just the first part. I don't want to break down every single detail of the rite as i know there are plans for others to perform it in the future. But essentially, each person was crowned with a golden, starry circlet by each of the presiding priestesses and priests. We were also guided to the thrones of the seated gods where we showered flower petals upon them, all in ecstatic song and dance.

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs

So, I'm pagan, I'm a classical singer, and on this blog I've detailed a couple of ways that those things work together.


Problem is, how does a classical singer get their start? By singing in churches.  Yea. Today I went to a church, willingly, to sing music there and try to get my start. 

I listened to the sermons and readings and looked at the sculptures on the altar, and I thought to myself, "Wow. I've learned so much about abrahamic religions since the last time I've been in church, I could tell you where these customs come from, and even what parts of this ritual are roman.." et cetera et cetera.  The layout of the church reminds me of the reconstructed Parthenon in Nashville, complete with gold-leafed sculpture of the Goddess.  The altar facing the sculpture would have been outside in Rome, rather than inside, and the people would gather for public rites on the steps rather than inside.  

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Candi
    Candi says #
    I do much the same, though it's hard for me. I too sing a lot of oratorio, and it's extremely difficult to sing well without putt
  • Theresa Wymer
    Theresa Wymer says #
    I've been working a bit with that issue as well, although in a more secular context. After much thought, I chose to devote my chor

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