paganSquare

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Login
    Login Login form

Studies Blogs

Advanced and/or academic Pagan subjects such as history, ethics, sociology, etc.

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Meditations on Hávamál, 31-34

Here are a few more stanzas in my ongoing project examining the verses of Hávamál, the medieval Norse gnomic verses of wisdom and advice, copied down in Iceland centuries ago.


31.
Fróðr þykkisk,
sá er flótta tekr,
gestr at gest hæðinn;
veit-a görla,
sá er of verði glissir,
þótt hann með grömum glami.

Wise he thinks himself to be,
The guest who takes to sneering at [another] guest.
He doesn't know,
The one who mocks at meals,
Though he scoffs noisily.

...
Last modified on
1
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    Thanks!
  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    This...this, a thousand tomes over. Brilliant, as usual. May I quote you in my essay/introduction on retribalizing the West?
  • Kate Laity
    Kate Laity says #
    Of course, of course! I'd be delighted.

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

Hi.  I am NOT god-phone material.  I am so lazy and procrastinat-ive that I just don't keep up regular communications with any deities at all.  I had a thing with Bast a while back, but I"m a lazy mo-fo. And I'm proud of it.  I'm still Pagan and live my life as naturally as possible (except for Taco Bell and the occasional battery-powered indulgence) with the caveat that I'm a hedonist. 

Anybody else out there who is okay with being a regular every-day sort of Pagan? No need to be a priest of anything? No need to have direct communication with a deity? Just enjoying the pleasures of natural living and natural worship?

Last modified on
3
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Roy
    Roy says #
    I personally go one step further. I Do Not Truck With Deities. Period. I don't worship, I don't invoke etc. I work with certain ar
  • Cat lover
    Cat lover says #
    I find this encouraging as I have never had an inkling that anything is out there. I might as well be talking to myself.
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    I spent twenty years as a Pagan without any clear conception of deity, much less a conversation with any. It can be a satisfying

This week has been very busy here in Geek Central, NV.  Pokemon X and Y just came out, and three of us have been exploring the wild world of strange talking animals for quite a while.  This isn't actually terribly unique, considering that six months out of the year, there's a heavy amount of obsession over My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic.

In this house, a geeky obsession is more than a sudden-and-inevitable commitment of time and finances.  It's a chance at initiation into some of the magicks of the world.

While sitting here and watching two of my boys froth over their Pokemon battles, I myself was exploring the online wikis for these games, learning about their legends.  There were, of course, the expected stats: growth and evolution progressions, abilities and special skills, elemental types...

...
Last modified on
1

Here’s a funny thing:  I had been a fan of initiations for most of my life - but never until my 60’s did I realize that every stage of my life was an initiation! 

I used to think that initiations were elaborately staged rituals like fraternity hazings, designed to teach certain lessons. They were very different from real life, since the neophyte was never actually in danger. They seemed to threaten deadly penalties, but if the initiate lost heart and gave up he was safely whisked out of the ritual space and deposited outside. He would never again be invited to join that organization, but at no point had his life or limbs actually been in danger.      

This false danger is described in Paul Christian's historic double volume, The History and Practice of Magic, wherein he conducts the reader through ancient Egyptian initiations of astounding technological complexity in a vast subterranean tunnel connecting the Great Pyramid with the Sphinx. His description has persisted through the ages and is enshrined, with only minor variations, in the traditions of the Rosicrucian Order, AMORC. 

...
Last modified on
1
Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • G. B. Harte
    G. B. Harte says #
    Hailings.... Just talked to a live human. Yes. An actual live human on the phone. Payment has not yet been recorded for license.
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    A nice bit of extrapolation, Astorious. By the way, as a musician I think you'll be interested in what comes up when you enter "As
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Middle road, yes, good work!

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
One Real Gripe, Two Frustrations

My gripe-du-jour is about people who volunteer to take on a task or role and then disappear.  I know it’s true that with all-volunteer organizations such as most Pagan groups are that the out-of-site-out-of-mind rule applies.  A volunteer leaves a meeting or gathering or festival full of zeal and ready to take on the work of whatever project(s) the group is planning.  That person may even have been provided with documents, mailing lists, etc. with which to accomplish the task(s).  He[1] may even have taken on the responsibilities of an officer within the organization.  Then he gets home and more immediate concerns distract and derail him.

This phenomenon was more damaging to Pagan efforts at organizing prior to the advent of the Internet.  For instance, within CoG, source of most but not all of my experience, membership applications must be timely processed or the applicant will wonder if her papers were even received.  And when a newsletter published eight times a year is the primary, and only official, vehicle of communication within the organization, getting every newsletter to the membership is critical.  Of course, today we can renew memberships online, and the newsletter editors of recent years have done a splendid job.  But back in the day such lapses in accomplishing volunteer tasks could have a negative impact on the group at large.

So although the matter of disappearing or non-performing volunteers does not have the same consequences today, it does affect the organizations on whose behalf one volunteered – negatively so when tasks are not fulfilled.

...
Last modified on
1
Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Terence P Ward
    Terence P Ward says #
    I definitely read -- and write -- posts that are shorter, and I harbor no guilt about that whatsoever. I've read hundreds of page

Additional information