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paganSquare

PaganSquare is a community blog space where Pagans can discuss topics relevant to the life and spiritual practice of all Pagans.

Subcategories from this category: Culture Blogs, Paths Blogs, Studies Blogs, SageWoman Blogs

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Elen - the Wild Spirit

She is with me - I can feel Her as soon as I step out the door.  She calls to me, she pulls me further away from the houses of humanity, deeper into the wilds; the windswept heath, the dark forest, the bright birch glades.  I smile and answer her call with a song in my heart, my footsteps getting lighter and lighter as I head out to meet Her. I walk taller, with more grace, my body flowing and moving without the restrictions that are usually placed upon it.  I feel an almost eldritch tingling in my blood - the awen is awakened.

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  • Jenn
    Jenn says #
    I love this so much!
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Beautiful. Thank you so much.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Paganicon 2014 will open this year with the (in)famous Rite of the Golden Calf.

The Rite was first created for a private festival in 1996 by Twin Cities liturgist Steven Posch. He recalls: “I'll never forget the faces as the procession with the Calf came through. At first, incredulity: Is this for real? Then dawning: This is it: the big one, the sin of sins. And then, abandon: Ohmigods, lemme at it! And they all came rushing in. It was wild, ecstatic: there were actually couples off in the woods afterward, just the way there should be.”

During the Rite, the Calf will be borne in festive Procession and Installed in a shrine in the Art Gallery. He will be accessible for acts of private devotion during Gallery Hours. A brief rite of public worship will take place daily at 12 noon.

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How do we make sense of loss, great loss, and everyday disappointment? Some would tell us that “everything has a purpose” or that whatever happens ”must be the will of God.”  I have found that these answers to questions raised by life as we know it often do more harm than good.  Yet they have a sticking power–we hear them all the time, sometimes even from other feminist seekers.

From the beginning feminists in religion rejected “the God out there” who rules the world from a throne in heaven. Most of us have insisted that “God” is more “in” the world than “beyond” or “outside it.” However we have not always been consistent in our convictions. When feminists are confronted with untimely death or great evil or just not getting what we think we want, we can sometimes be overheard to wonder, “Why did God (or Goddess) let that happen?” This question is based in the assumption that God or Goddess is omnipotent and rules the world from outside it. This is the theological idea I intend to question today.

The “zero fallacy” is a term philosopher Charles Hartshorne used to explain the “theological mistake” known as divine omnipotence.  Hartshorne pointed out that if God is omnipotent, then God has “all” or “100%” of the power. If this is so, then human beings and all other beings have “zero” power.  But if we have zero power, then do we even exist?  It is hard to imagine what “existence” means if it is a quality attributed to beings with zero power to affect the world. In fact, if God has 100% of the power, then no being other than the divine being can be said to exist. This is what Hindus may mean when they say that the world is “maya” or illusion.

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  • Diotima
    Diotima says #
    From a scientific perspective, as Neil deGrasse Tyson said; “We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chem

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

Hi Folks!

 

In the spirit of my more successful posts, I would like to ask you if there's any topic you'd like me to research, based on "Pagan Music" or "Paganism in Classical Music." What would it be?  Would you like to see articles on archaic, pre-christian music and instruments, or would you prefer that I show you the darker side of Classical music?

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  • Peter Ringo
    Peter Ringo says #
    I don't think I was real clear. The gender nonconformity would need to be connected to spirituality in some way--as an attribute o
  • Candi
    Candi says #
    @Peter: Sure! For example, there are a number of works from the 18th century that involve a man or boy cross dressing in order to
  • Peter Ringo
    Peter Ringo says #
    The Balumain practice is awesome, but I'm looking for music literature--traditional songs and classical pieces that allude to gend

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Are you poor on purpose?

The reactions to my post voluntary poverty last week have one striking commonality:  we're talking about the voluntary poor, but no one has stepped forward to speak for the voluntary poor.  I am hoping the readers of PaganSquare can help me find at least one representative of this choice.

Do you presently know someone who is poor by choice, spiritual or otherwise?  Can you point them to this post or, if they're not a user of the internet, act as an intermediary?  Anyone interested can use this contact form.

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