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SageWoman Blogs

At SageWoman magazine, we believe that you are the Goddess, and we're devoted to celebrating your journey. We invite you to subscribetoday and join our circle...

Here in the SageWoman section of PaganSquare, our bloggers represent the multi-faceted expressions of the Goddess, feminist, and women's spirituality movements.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

         I’m not sure when I first began to divert all my precious breath into the colorful hot air balloon I had sewn together with remnants of mangled religious myths, and yards of unrealistic and projected expectations.  But, somewhere between college and grad school, I filled it with enough of my own hot air to launch it into the stratosphere.  By the time I was 40, the balloon was so voluminous, so huge, so heavy, even my frantic hyperventilation could no longer keep it aloft.  I did not have enough breath in my body, and it crashed to the earth.  

        Dazed and disoriented, I untangled myself from the yards and yards of brightly stitched stories, and crawled out from under the wreckage.  Slowly I began to breathe easier, in and out, no longer winded, no longer light headed. With my precious breath no longer diverted to an untenable cause, I began to examine the pieces of fabric I had sewn together. 

        The huge swath of purple cloth was the mangled myth of an ancient faith I had adopted as a nine-year-old.  The story told of a wise and loving god/man sacrificed by his father god for the redemption of the world.  In the corrupt version of that faith, violence was not only allowed, but required somehow by the elder god.  In the corrupt version of that faith, we were supposed to also sacrifice our very selves to follow him.  Even though I had rejected that interpretation of the story through my studies in seminary, it still permeated the institutions through which I did my work as a minister.  

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  • Julie Landa
    Julie Landa says #
    A beautiful reminder of the lifelong process of remembering yourself and finding balance. Thank you!
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Thank you Julie - blessings on your process and balance.
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    Loved this very much. Thank you.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Revealing the Goddess Within

 

I imagine every artist creates a self portrait sooner or later, despite their medium or any physical resemblance to the artist recognizable in the final result. After all, as we were manifested at the will of the Creator, we too are innately driven to recreate in our own image, whether by bringing children into the world, creating visual, written or musical art, or simply infusing our life and work with personal energy.

The paint is barely dry on this piece, and yet she has been in the making longer even than my Big Bang Goddess. She is, in fact, my first attempt in the acrylic medium and my first human figure if I don’t count the years of children’s stick figures followed by a lengthy period of cartoon like faces exploring the significance of eyebrow shape and placement to convey emotion.

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  • JudithAnn
    JudithAnn says #
    Thank you Lizann and Molly for your blessings and compliments.
  • Molly
    Molly says #
    Love it!
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Blessings on this beautiful being that is you!

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Dancing Crone

Dancing is a means of connecting with oneself and the goddess. Belly dancing, Chakra dance and temple style dance easily lend themselves to connection with ones higher self, all offer the chance to allow us to move freely, to flow in rhythm with the music, as we experience a falling away of self doubt and image conciseness. These forms allow women of all sizes and ages to come together without fearing judgement on their looks or weight or even any physical impairment that might hinder them from executing the gravity defying leaps and spins we so often see on TV program where the young and beautiful compete with each other to win money and fame.

 

I am a belly dancer and will turn 60 this Christmas. The style I've chosen to learn is the Tribal style, earthy and grounded, where the dancers stand more solidly rooted on both the balls and heels of their feet rather than elevated on the balls for the majority of the dance. Tribal does incorporate the Cabaret method as well as utilize other dances from various cultures. When we perform our Tribal Fusion dances we draw from bits of Jazz, Salsa, Bhangra, Temple, even country line dance if it fits the choreographed number for our performance.b2ap3_thumbnail_gallowayJanice.jpgOur costumes are bright for the Tribal style with large flowing 25 yard skirts that swirl and move with us in a cloud of gauzy cotton. Scarves and belts adorned with bells, heavy silver jewelry, or beaded patches bring an emphasis to our hips. And yes, we dance to accentuate our hips, not to hide them, Often our skirts are pulled up and tucked into the waistband creating ruffled layers at our sides, or bustled in the back, drawing the eye to our hips, to the part of our bodies that support our young as we carry our babies to term. Our hips are goddess-like, and our bellies, and our costumes allow the movement of both to be clearly seen.

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  • Joan M Gray
    Joan M Gray says #
    I have just started belly dancing. My motive is to stop back pain, which it is doing. I didn't know the history of belly dancing

Nature Before & After by Cuba Gallery @ FlickrI've been taking time daily, to connect with the spirits of my space, at work, home, the grocery store, the homes of others, and the commute connecting it all. It seems so silly. I've spent all these years focused on THIS totem, THAT guide, THIS space, sacred on/off, despite that intellectually I've known it's with me all the time. I am it. It is All.

What's the expression--the hell you know--to say nothing of the sacred.

I guess I'm beginning to sit more comfortably with not having to name things, less lines,  deeper relationships--even if they only last a few moments. The realization that whatever I need is wherever I am, etherically, all the time, no matter what, is heady empowerment. It's also terribly humbling.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
The Women Who Painted in Caves

As the upcoming Mercury retrograde and the natural progression of the seasons here in the Northern Hemisphere takes us on a journey into the Underworld, let us contemplate our deep, ancient ancestors. Fittingly, we will travel into the caves of our past, if only in our minds.

Cave paintings have been presented to us as a masculine narrative. Often, these stunning examples of paleolithic art, have been interpreted as created by male hunters to increase the hunt. Other theories have suggested that the paintings were to communicate something to visitors to the caves, perhaps of religious significance. Intriguingly, these paintings depict both predator and prey animals. However, that’s not all. Cave paintings also sometimes depict voluptuous female figures and symbols for the vulva.

Who painted these images?

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ms. Mills, Thanks for the insight! It helps to illuminate not only the how and the why, but the who, of paleolithic cave art. It

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