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SageWoman Blogs

At SageWoman magazine, we believe that you are the Goddess, and we're devoted to celebrating your journey. We invite you to subscribetoday and join our circle...

Here in the SageWoman section of PaganSquare, our bloggers represent the multi-faceted expressions of the Goddess, feminist, and women's spirituality movements.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
African Beer Goddesses

Women and Goddesses are credited as the originators of beer in ancient cultures worldwide. While our culture might frame beer as a stereotypically masculine drink, the history of beer is far more complex and interesting. As we saw in ancient Sumer, women not only brewed beer but also were the primary tavern keepers. For this round of our discussion, we’ll turn our sights to the African continent to find out more about Goddesses who love to drink!

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  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Yesterday right after I read your column I headed off for my monthly massage - my masseuse was randomly drinking a beer during my
  • Emily Mills
    Emily Mills says #
    So interesting! I love the connections that I'm finding as I blog here.
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Fun! Thanks for the info - whiskey next?
Practical Priestessing: Who Does She Think SHE is?!

 “The journey to become a priestess…(even of the urban variety) remains a grueling task, not something capable of being conferred by a few weekend workshops or sweat lodges. The glibness with which such terms are used can be infuriating…” –Vivienne Vernon-Jones in Voices of the Goddess by Caitlin Matthews

“The Goddess is not only for the temple, she must be carried out into the world to wherever she is needed…” –Vivianne Crowley (in Voices of the Goddess edited by Caitlin Matthews)

I recently finished writing a paper for my The Role of the Priestess course at Ocean Seminary College. This course explores the three roles of a priestess in depth: counselor (mentor), ritualist, and teacher. The first paper was designed to explore the role of priestess as counselor and I found it very difficult to write. After some reflection, I realized the difficulty was due to three personal reasons: doubt that I “deserve” to call myself a priestess, doubt about my own ability to fulfill the counselor part of the role, and fear of not being “good enough” or “perfect” enough to fulfill this piece of the priestess role. I am fairly comfortable with the roles of ritualist-ceremonialist and of teacher and I also feel good about how well I already fulfill those roles. The Counselor though. She’s scary. Am I good enough? Can I really do this? Who do I think I am?

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  • Paola Suarez
    Paola Suarez says #
    Another powerful Priestess post Molly. A lot of great quotes to ponder ingest and digest. Reading this makes me even more excited
  • Shari Wright
    Shari Wright says #
    Thank you for putting this so eloquently. I have always felt was a strong Ritualist/ Ceremonialist and Teacher. Those are the ro
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Thank you. Good things to remember.

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Chickweed

I recently spent sometime learning how to scour the California country side for medicinal plants and herbs. One plant that was a surprise to me was the abundance of a weed known for its fascinating health benefits and tasting remotely like fresh picked corn.

The botanical name ~ Stellaria media ~ meaning ‘little stars’, or commonly known as Chickweed, can affect your physical and psychic health, by opening up cosmic energies and giving the strength handle these energies. Chickweed has been used in folk medicine for skin conditions, indigestion rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, stomach ulcers and as a "blood cleanser". When chickweed is consumed, it increases the body’s ability to absorb nutrients, especially minerals. It can also dissolve and break down unwanted matter, including disease-causing bacteria, cysts, benign tumors, thickened mucus in the respiratory and digestive systems, and excess fat cells. Yes, you heard me correctly; drinking chickweed infusion can eliminate fat cells.

The appearance of chickweed seems to be very fragile; however it is quite a hardy herb.  The normal growing season begins in the fall and is capable of enduring harsh winter storms. Its seeds usually produce by the spring, although the plant can begin to bloom when the ground is still frozen. The strength and vigor of this herb is so robust that it blossoms, in most areas of the country, every single month of the year.

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Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

In a Wonderland they lie,
Dreaming as the days go by,
Dreaming as the summers die:

Ever drifting down the stream—
Lingering in the golden gleam—
Life, what is it but a dream?
—from “A Boat, Beneath a Sunny Sky” by Lewis Carroll

When I was a child, I had dreams. Lots of them. Run of the mill dreams, fantastical dreams, spy dreams (one of my favorites), and day dreams. There were the flying dreams, dreams where I soared over Egyptian pyramids and thick, darkly lit forests. A few times I had fun zooming around with Peter Pan. And there was one dream where I realized I was dreaming and decided to attempt things that are somewhat more difficult in waking life, such as levitating myself and various objects. While lucidly dreaming, I also decided it would be a cool idea to walk through my wall. It was cool. The grass outside was black-green and barely visible, but the night sky glittered with a few starry jewels, illuminating the tree and slope of the hill in our front yard, where my bedroom faced. I still remember some of these quite clearly and look back with fondness and sometimes yearning, particularly for the flying dreams. A certain few of my dreams, however, have left indelible marks on my life. A certain few have led me to the Goddess.

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  • Kalyca Schultz
    Kalyca Schultz says #
    Thank you, Lizann! I just saw that I missed your post ostensibly about feet (?)! As a typical Pisces, I will ramble on over now to
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Lovely - thank you. I was lucky growing up as a mystic child to have folk around who affirmed, rather than disparaged, my reality
  • Kalyca Schultz
    Kalyca Schultz says #
    Francesca, merry meet! And thank you! I would love it if anything I share here helps someone to know they are not alone, they are

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs

MY SACRED BLOOD

My blood
My deep red flowing blood
Flowing in joyous delight
Through the caverns and crevices
Of my life
My good red blood
Racing in anticipation
Of things yet to be revealed
Full of curiosity
Feeling no restraint
Innocent of dangers
Powerful beyond my knowing….yet…..

My good red blood
My hot red blood
Wishing to be seen
Sticky on my thighs
What is this new wonder
My blood
My deep red blood
Turning brown
On my slim white skirt
Time of revelation
Time of consternation
For this good red blood
Singing like a river of celebration
Through my now woman veins
My blood
My good red hot Maiden blood
Called back to the Earth
Running down my legs
Leaving little red pools
On the fresh mown grass

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  • Paola Suarez
    Paola Suarez says #
    Thank you so much dearest sister Anique! I loved your poem and can imagine you singing it. I can relate to your menstruation story
  • Paola Suarez
    Paola Suarez says #
    I posted a quote from your blog post Anique on my FB page http://tinyurl.com/m85rhfq and linked back to this page. I'm still in aw
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Thank you. I am loving the croning process and appreciate your wise words on the deepening of our blood at this time in life.

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