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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Binding Ink Spell
If you are lucky enough to live in the country or near a wild and weedy meadow, you can easily find pokeberries. Though poisonous when eaten, these magenta berries make wonderful homemade ink. You can imbue this wine-colored ink with magical powers with this simple spell.
 
During a waning moon, fill a vial with dark red ink and add the juice from the crushed pokeberries. Add a few drops of burgundy wine from the bottom of your love’s glass and one drop of a fruited essential oil such as apple blossom, apricot, or peach.
 
Adventurous witches sometimes prick their fingers and add a droplet of blood as well. Incant aloud:
 
By my hand, this spell I have wrought.
With this sacred ink, I will author my own destiny.
And have the happy love I sought.
Blessed be.

Now write the fate you envision for yourself and your lover with enchanted ink.
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
An Enchanted Love Letter

Love letters are an ancient art that always deepens intimacy. What heart doesn’t surge when the object of affection pours passion onto the printed page? Magic ink, prepared paper, and magic wax will seal the deal.

Take a special sheet of paper (sumptuous handmade or creamy watermarked stationary is ideal) and write with a magical colored ink—red dragon’s blood is available at most metaphysical shops—or try the “Enchantment Ink” spell that follows.

...
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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tie the Knot of True Love

If you are truly interested in long-term love, this spell is for you. This love spell may not actually result in a proposal and marriage, but the rings are a powerful symbol to help bring true love your way. You’ll need:

  • White rope
  • 1 fresh red rose, with stem
  • 2 plain gold rings (Rings in a gold color are fine) 
  •  Fine white sand (easily available at a craft store)

You can use thick yarn instead of the rope, but string just won’t do. Tie a knot in the center of the rope around the stem of the rose. Slide the two rings down the two ends of the rope up to the knot, then tie the rope again to secure them.

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Lady Moon, Lady Moon

 

Lady Moon, Lady Moon,

shining so bright:

where are the little stars

hiding tonight?

Ask the old owl

that lives in the tree.

Who's that behind you?

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New-Old Minoan Deities: The Discovery of Joy

One of the more exciting aspects of revivalist spirituality is the discovery of new-to-us deities. It doesn't happen very often, but when it does, we do a little happy dance!

In this case, a happy dance is especially appropriate. Allow me to introduce you to a new deity pair: Thumia and Kaulo.

...
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Posted by on in Paths Blogs

Rainbow Season is my kindred's end of summer ritual. Since summer is monsoon rain season the end of summer is rainbow season. We honor the mermaids in the summer and Heimdall at the end of summer. Heimdall was Tom Newman's patron. I don't know if we're going to keep doing that in future years but we're at least doing it one more time, this year, in honor of Tom. It's also 1 year since he died.

Heimdall is the Guardian of the Rainbow Bridge. The Rainbow Bridge is the path that leads from Asgard to wherever the gods want to go. When the end of the rainbow touches down on Earth (Midgard) it only goes one place, to Asgard. The gods can bring dead people to Asgard via the Bridge if they wish to select specific humans for that honor.

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What do you do when you're stuck with a liability?

Gods know, it wouldn't be Harvest Home without a few pumpkin pies—our Equinox feast is basically Witches' Thanksgiving, but with better food and better music—so I opened up a couple of cans of organic pumpkin and set to work.

Ugh.

You'd think that I would know by now: “organic” is no guarantor of anything. The pumpkin looked downright nasty: watery, stringy, brown.

Well, you can only play the hand that you're dealt. I whipped up the eggs with a little brown sugar and added the pumpkin. (It looked a little better once I'd pureed it.) On a whim, I substituted a can of coconut milk for the usual sweetened condensed milk. Taking a page from a friend's playbook, I used Chinese Five Spice powder instead of pumpkin pie spice.

When the pies came out of the oven, I couldn't help but grimace. Pumpkin pies should be an appealing orange-brown color, not greige. To call them “unappetizing” looking would be an understatement.

Next day, I tried a piece for lunch, dreading—in case they weren't good enough to serve to the coven—the prospect of having two whole pies to dispose of.

Much to my relief, it was actually pretty tasty. I even had a second slice, just to make sure.

What do you do when handed a liability? In the Art Magical, we call it Metamorphosis: you transform the liability into an asset.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Most commercial pumpkin pies are way over-nutmeg-ed for my taste. Alas, making things at home is no guarantor, either.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I once had a store bought pumpkin pie that had no flavor at all. It looked pretty, but I couldn't taste it, all I got was texture

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