Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

fall_leaves.jpgThis is the most important New Moon of the year. It’s an eclipse that will further emphasize the Saturn-Neptune square that has been dogging us this year, particularly in the political, social and environmental arenas, including an inability to get to the truth, “othering” (e.g. racism, misogyny, religious persecution), floods and fires and major problems with pollution, particularly water pollution. These and other Saturn-Neptune issues (finding truth, spiritual materialism, a pull towards authoritarianism) are being brought to our attention so we can fix them, both in our personal lives and on a larger stage. The eclipse insists we look at how we’re doing with that, and work on manifesting our spiritual ideals in a practical way.

As with all challenging charts — and make no mistake, this is a formidable chart — there is a tremendous amount of power being made available to us, so we will need to stay focused and sharp to make sure that power is directed to our benefit, and hopefully the benefit of all. The benefits here, if we work with the energy, include powerful, practical visions, a balancing of perspective, improved health, wisdom born of experience, and a deeper insight into our personal spiritual paths.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Beardman

Well, beards are back.

These days it seems like every third guy's sporting one.

Which brings me (of course) to the god of the witches.

Oh, it's a long and winding thread that I spin today, my friend. Take hold of the end and let's see where it leads us.

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Every Day Magic: A Pagan Book of Days - Call for Submissions

Moon Books, the Paganism/Shamanism imprint of John Hunt Publishing, is accepting submissions for their 365 title Every Day Magic: A Pagan Book of Days. Deadline is September 15, 2016.

Editor Lucya Szachnowski invites you to write 80 words or less on pagan festivals, anniversaries, deities, practices, celebrated figures, observances, etc. Submissions can be spells, rituals, meditations, pagan prayers, aphorisms, divinatory techniques, recipes and craft projects. Be creative!

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The Pagan Era

So: a Wiccan, a Druid, and a Kemetic Reconstructionist walk into a bar.

By any reasonable standard, these people all practice different religions, right?

That's why the term "pagan" is so brilliant.

I've been part of this long enough that I can remember when we first started calling ourselves—and, more importantly, thinking of ourselves—as pagan.

BPE (Before the Pagan Era), Wiccans, Druids, and Kemetic Reconstructionists were different modalities of being. But add the name, and suddenly: hey, presto, it's now the Pagan Era, and we perceive one another as (in some way, shape, or form) belonging to the same group, as different clans in the same overall tribe.

Being pagan together gives us numbers. Suddenly there are millions of us across the world, and numbers = power. Suddenly I have something in common with someone that I've never met in Kyrgyzstan. (Since independence, there's been a big resurgence of traditional religion across Central Asia.)

Let no one doubt the power of a single word.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Ancient Women’s Olympics

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ms. Meenee, Thank you for sharing this. As a Hellenic Platonist, this is all very relevant to my spiritual practice. I wasn't awa

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Passion of the Harvest

At noon on the first day of the festival, we blew the horns. Then we pulled the young Corn King in his chariot through the grove in which the gathering was held.

By the next day, word had begun to spread. A few came out to watch the Corn King in his noon progress among his people.

The third day, there were more. Some would bow, or kneel by the side of the way to receive his blessing as he passed. These he would shower with kernels of corn.

As the week went on, people began to join the procession. They brought their children to receive the Harvest Lord's blessing. Late arrivals to the festival heard about the processions by word of mouth.

People had known the Young Lord since his boyhood, during the festival's earliest years. They had watched him grow up there, year by year. Now they welcomed his triumph. Grown to beautiful, golden manhood, he was everyone's son, everyone's beloved.

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There's been a powerful disturbance in the Force the last couple days.

Yesterday, the group that calls itself the Asatru Folk Assembly left a Facebook post which I have screen-cap't at right. 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    The American Asatru Association is against racism, homophobia, misogyny, and other hatreds.
  • Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker
    Susan “Moonwriter” Pesznecker says #
    Greybeard, do I understand you to suggest that I (and others) are "hurling hatred" at the AFA? Nothing could be further from the t
  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    Yes, there is a huge amount of intolerance and hatred being hurled at the Asatru Folk. Sad. Often those who shout the loudest a

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