Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs
Move the Olympics Back to Greece. Permanently.

 Caution: Rant Alert.

 

Och. The Olympics just haven't been themselves since the barbarians took them over.

Every four years, the International Olympic Committee—the world's third most corrupt international body (after the Vatican and FIFA)—rakes in billions in bribes and awards the quadrennial Summer Games to a municipality which then bankrupts itself building white elephant sports venues that will never be used again.

I say, move the Games back to Greece. Permanently.

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
And When They Ask You...

And when they ask you,

Why do you worship

the creation, not the creator?

ask in return,

Why would you separate them?

Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
CRYSTAL GRIDS: WHAT ARE THEY?

 

A crystal grid is a layout of crystals placed around a person, (in which you want to affect a change), or a place, (in which you want to maintain a vibration).

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Mother Tongue

We don't know what language was spoken by the Copper Age peoples of what Marija Gimbutas called “Old Europe.”

But whatever it was, we still—in a sense—speak it today.

English is an Indo-European language. The Indo-European languages all descend from a language spoken during the late Stone Age on the prairies (“steppes”) between the Black and Caspian Seas. This language was spoken by a milk-drinking, pastoralist people who domesticated the horse and invented (and named) the wheel. (Our wheel comes ultimately from their word *kwelkwlos, literally a “turn-turn.”)

Their nearest neighbors, to the southwest, in what is now Ukraine, Poland, and Rumania, were the Cucuteni-Tripolye cultures made famous by archaeologist and feminist ideologue Marija Gimbutas. These were settled farmers, eaters of bread and beans, whose bold, swirling designs, striking ceramics, and fetching little female figurines still speak directly to us today.

These two, the Indo-European and the Old European, were, in effect, our Father and Mother Cultures.

And we still speak their languages today.

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Why Christians Thrive and Pagans Fail

I have read many posts in forums, in blogs, and elsewhere regarding the social issues of the Pagan community.

 

...
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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Emil
    Emil says #
    There are other things, which hold the pagan community back.Myself, being dedicated pagan for many years, I had moments, when I wa
  • Brian Radcliffe
    Brian Radcliffe says #
    Honestly, I don't know what Christian church the author went to because in my experience they are very fractured. The differing de
  • Anne Newkirk Niven
    Anne Newkirk Niven says #
    Dearest Leandra, Your criticism is spot-on, and your proposed solutions sound. I have only one caveat: you are comparing a squall
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    My dear friend and colleague Sparky T. Rabbit (of "Lunacy" fame)--a professional actor well-versed in methods of critique--always
  • Leandra Witchwood
    Leandra Witchwood says #
    Thank you. I am a firm believer that if you bring a complaint or issue to the table you must also come prepared with a solution.
Reassembling Osiris, or: Flowers for Mona Lisa

I am because you are.

(Louis Alemayehu)

 

In the spring of 1974, Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa—arguably the most famous painting in the world—visited Japan.

There she was welcomed in a manner quite quintessentially Japanese.

People sent flowers.

At the time, I can remember thinking, Of course: that's absolutely right. That's exactly what you do to honor such a powerful...well, kami.

It's an action quintessentially Shinto.

And quintessentially pagan.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    The side-shadows make me envision a standing "herm" carved on each side, facing all four directions. I suppose there would be an o
  • Ali Art
    Ali Art says #
    Lovely!
  • Paul B. Rucker
    Paul B. Rucker says #
    I love the way this was lit: I told Larry-- the Vine Arts Center member who did the lighting-- as much. He did a masterful job all
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    I see that mine aren't the only floral offerings. Better and better. Gods, I didn't notice the shadows at the opening last night.
  • Michele
    Michele says #
    What a beautiful work of art!
Children's Song Preserves Early American Hymn to Goddess of Witches, Says Academic

AP: Boston

Was the common American children's song She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain originally a hymn to the Moon Goddess of the Witches?

A new study by historian and ethnomusicologist Stefano Pozzo, current chair of ethnomusicology at Massachusetts' prestigious Miskatonic University, suggests that this may indeed be the case.

“It's one of the great mysteries of American paidomusicology [the study of children's music],” says Pozzo. “Who is this mysterious and powerful female driving six white horses? I think that we can now say confidently that we know exactly who she is.”

In the current issue of Ethnomusicology Today, Pozzo examines the earliest surviving texts of the song to present his case.

She'll be coming' round the mountain when she comes,” he writes, “Could one ask for a clearer image of moonrise?”

According to Pozzo, when 17th century British witches fled to the New World to escape religious persecution, they brought their immemorial devotion to the Moon along with them.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • K
    K says #
    I wonder if they have an original copy of this song in the Orne Library?
  • Althea
    Althea says #
    Miskatonic University, huh?
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Wikipedia has "red" pajamas, but I like "silk" much better. And sleeping with Grandma fits right in: it's funny and mythic both.
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    I've heard red pyjamas too. The added line with sleep with grandma is "move over." With chicken n dumplins it's "yum yum." etc.
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    Oh and the Mountain Mother is one of the most common images of the Goddess in places where there are visible mountains.

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