Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs
The Devil (at the Crossroads)

Saturday, June 8, 2017 is International Tarot Day!  Trivia is celebrating by participating in the worldwide blog hop.  When you are done dancing with the Devil at the Crossroads, please be sure to hop backwards to enjoy Kimberly's post (also) about the Devil, and hop forward to take a tryst Janet in the Tower.  How are you celebrating tarot today?  What's your favorite way to enjoy the cards?  You can also check out the master list of blog hop participants over at Falcon Cloak Tarot.  Finally, Much love and thanks to Bree Ferguson at Nym’s Divination for putting this blog hop together!

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  • kimberly essex
    kimberly essex says #
    What a great exploration of the Devil card, Trivia! I love how you bring life to all that is said about this card. “That which is

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God of Both Ways

They say that the god of the witches has two faces.

Bifrons, they call him: old Two-Face.

Ianiformis, they call him: shaped like Ianus, the old Roman god of Time.

Two faces, fore and aft. But of course what's before and what's behind is all a matter of where you're standing, isn't it?

For this, Margaret Murray named him Dianus = Ianus, lord of beginnings and endings, like the month that bears his name.

Two faces, and when you arrive at the sabbat, you greet him with a kiss on both sets of lips.

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The Loch Ness Monster: The “Unknown Unknowables”

Stories about monsters lurking in deep lakes abound worldwide. Noted cryptozoologists (Note 1) Loren Coleman and Patrick Huyghe have collected these stories and analyzed them. They believe that the 1933 sighting of the Loch Ness Monster (Note 2) ignited the public’s interest in Lake Monsters. Now sightings of these beasts are reported regularly worldwide. Meanwhile, “Nessie,” as the Loch Ness Monster is now known as, has entered popular culture as an endearing character.

Loch Ness is a tectonic lake that lies on the Great Glen Fault Line. Long and narrow, it was gouged deep by receding glaciers. This area is seismically active, which makes searching for any Lake Monster difficult. Add to this difficulty is the deepness of the lake that hinders extensive searches.

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Dark Side of the Year

We're past Midsummer and into the heat of summer.  A friend of mine mentioned we're on the dark side of the year now because each day we have a little less light.  The phrase stuck with me as I worked through my days.

Every day we shift to a minute or two less of light.  The clock is ticking, ticking, ticking to remind us to finish whatever our goals are for this year.  How many times have you heard someone say - where did the year go or where did the month go?  

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Unnatural

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  • Raynet
    Raynet says #
    I grew up in a Christian Household, and was always interested in paganism. My parents would never let me have anything to do with
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Thank you, as someone who feels they are ineptly stumbling down the path of witchcraft/conjure, it is refreshing to hear that I am

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Neanderthal Goddess

In The Inheritors, William Golding tells the story of the last Neanderthals.

For Golding's Neanderthals, Earth is goddess. They call her Oa.

Oa.

Novelist William Golding (1911-1993) is probably best known for his novel Lord of the Flies. Pagans might perhaps be aware that it was also he who named the Gaia Hypothesis.

It turns out that scientist James Lovelock was expostulating to his longtime friend and neighbor concerning his ideas about Earth as a self-regulating system.

His Earth-as-single-being needed a name. “What about 'Gaia'?” suggested Golding.

It's hard not to see metaphor here: Science and Literature as friends and neighbors, grabbing a pint together down at the local, maybe.

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Glamour Isn't Pretty

As many of you know, Jow and I take our shop, The Mermaid & The Crow on the road, primarily to Pride events and Punk Rock events.  While there are winsome Ladies of Certain Age with their silver hair dyed in glam unicorn pastels and young families with children with spiky hair and capes, the primary group of people who attend these events are Youngs.  More specifically, Young Women most often.  We've been doing these events for years now, so I've become accustomed to seeing these two legged gazelles with perfect skin romping in rompers like some kind of crazy rite that Pan would be thrilled to have.  They are lovely and, I think, lovelier than I was at their age because now everyone has Invisalign, a dermatologist and a far better diet.

Here's the thing.

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  • Tacy West
    Tacy West says #
    I agree. I was in my 20's during the flower people, hippie, nature worshipers era and we were beautiful then due to diet before

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