Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

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Spring Dreams

All summer long the little clay goddess has stood in the good, brown earth of the garden.

All summer long she has watched over the waxing of the crops.

Now, standing in a bowl of seed wheat, she presides over the Harvest Supper.

(On Midwinter's Eve we will eat this self-same wheat, made sweet with honey, rich with almonds and poppy seed, perfumed with rose water, from this very bowl.)

And when the last bite has been taken, the last toast poured, she will go to her bed in the storage cupboards, with the fruits of summer all around her.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Equinox to Equinox

It's the morning of the Autumn Equinox.

The kitty is playing with something, up and down the hall.

Clacketta clacketta clacketta.

What is that damn cat playing with now? I wonder.

Turns out, it's a jelly bean.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
THE DOMESTIC CAT: Equanimity

Bred from the more social African wildcat, the domestic cat has been a part of people’s lives since before the time of the ancient Egyptians. Remains of the domestic cats were found, on the island of Cyprus, dating from 8000 B.C.E. Unlike her elusive cat cousins, African Wildcat liked living close to towns and villages. The domestic cat, like her ancestor, is tamer and less secretive than most wildcats. She socializes with people, however like a true cat, only on her terms.

Living in a social hierarchy, the domestic cat forms close friendships. In her family group (kindle), the domestic cat sits with and nose-bumps her friends. By rubbing her body against other cats, She reinforces the bonds of her Kindle. (A cat that is rubbed the most is the highest-ranking cat.) 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Needed: A Red Pentagram

There are pagans everywhere.

And natural disasters (“ill-starred [events]”) are just going to happen.

That's why we need a Red Pentagram.

When the hurricane blows or the ground quakes, when the river floods or the wildfire burns, I want to help. But frankly (call me a tribalist; see if I care), I'd rather help pagans. Being a people means helping your own.

How would it work? Don't ask me; I'm just a dreamer.

But ask yourself: what might such a thing look like?

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  • Ariel Aron
    Ariel Aron says #
    I agree. I am always looking for a sense of community just wish there are more efficient ways to communicate.and find those commun
Take action on US involvement in the Paris Climate Accord

President Trump’s administration has given mixed signals on the United States’ participation in the Paris Climate Accord. For those who don’t know, "The Paris Agreement (French: Accord de Paris), Paris climate accord or Paris climate agreement, is an agreement within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) dealing with greenhouse gas emissions mitigation, adaptation and finance starting in the year 2020.

"The language of the agreement was negotiated by representatives of 196 parties at the 21st Conference of the Parties of the UNFCCC in Paris and adopted by consensus on 12 December 2015. As of September 2017, 195 UNFCCC members have signed the agreement, 162 of which have ratified it." (Thank you, Wikipedia!)

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Fire and Flood, Wind and Rain: Balance at the Equinox

The Autumn started this morning, and I went looking for balance.

                Is there balance in between the fires that charred California, Oregon, and Montana, and the floods that drowned Houston?

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  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    There was balance n the earthquake in Japan, for sure. Usually when there is one on one side of the world, here is one on the othe

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Harvest Hymn

Anglican vicar Henry Alford wrote the original lyrics to the Harvest hymn Come Ye Thankful People Come in 1844; it's generally sung to George Job Elvey's tune, St. George, Windsor. You can hear it here in Steeleye Span's version from their 1980 album, Sails of Silver. (The song Marigold comes first; the first verse of "Harvest Home" comes at the end.)

Here's our version of this Harvest classic, as we've sung it at our Harvest Supper every year for the last 38 years now. High Anglican diction and heavy-handed imagery notwithstanding, it still chokes me up every time.

 

Come Ye Thankful People Come

 

Come ye thankful people, come:

raise the song of Harvest Home.

All is safely gathered in

ere the winter storms begin.

Earth our Mother doth provide

for our wants to be supplied.

Come ye thankful people, come:

raise the song of Harvest Home.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Thanks, Tasha, and a Happy Harvest to you. Most covens have a Book of Shadows; we have a songbook instead. After Yule and Beltane,
  • Tasha Halpert
    Tasha Halpert says #
    This is so very lovely. Thanks so much for sharing. I do enjoy your columns, Blessed Be, Tasha

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