Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs
Pagan Event Planning: Recipes for Disaster Part 3

In Part 1 and Part 2, we looked at Team Intrepid as it began an event planning process for a Pagan event without creating any structure for decision-making or establishing any goals, and diving right into minutia of the event. And making the wrong decision first can have a lot of impact on later planning.

Event Venue Choices

Let's say Team Intrepid assumes we'll be doing the event at Green Tree Park. They aren’t making this decision for any strategic reason, it's just that the team leader lives near the park and is familiar with the park. 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Wolf Law

I'm a storyteller, so in the natural course of things I often find myself telling stories about the gods.

Yikes.

Incest. Murder. Sexual Coercion. To name only some. All the things you're not supposed to do.

The Church Fathers made much of the immorality of the pagan gods. (Considering how their god is said to behave, this strikes me as pretty damned chutzpadik.) But it's no real surprise to hear that the Church Fathers didn't understand gods, not even their own.

They're gods, in another category of being. They don't operate according to human law. They have their own.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

It’s good to get out of your bubble sometimes. A few days ago I was listening to a podcast called “Sawbones.” It’s a humorous take on medical history hosted by a Dr. Sydnee McElroy and her husband Justin. The episode was on the history of acne treatment, and boy was there some crazy stuff people used to do to get rid of their zits.

Sawbones acne

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
A Month for Loki: Community

I'm not the most recon of Loki's followers (I'm sure some of you snicker snorted: GOOD), however, I do enjoy sumbel - yes I know, Wiki, but I lack the spoons to vet heathen sites for racist, folkish bullshit today, so you're getting the wiki. If you need a non-Wiki recon take on Loki worship, read Nono's blog entry on it. Anywho, the practice of Lokabrenna celebrations in July/early August are a modern Lokean practice.

I'm fortunate enough to live near a number of Lokeans - one of my distance kindred members actually wondered aloud recently "why are there so many Lokeans in Florida?"

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Magical Mondays: Two Spells for Healing

Almost everyone has health issues now and again. Some unlucky folks have chronic pain or disabilities, or are surprised with a sudden unpleasant diagnosis that turns their lives upside down. Whether it is something small and annoying or large and disruptive, health issues can a pain in the, well, pain.

Those who have to deal with such things (me included) use whatever tools they can to help themselves heal. Sometimes that means doctors and medicine, sometimes it means increasing your exercise and changing your diet, or taking up meditation, or making sure your life is more balanced. For anything major, it usually means all of those and more.

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I was sitting in a circle discussion on the Sunday morning of a recent Buddhist retreat when the word 'aggression' came up and was decried as a thing that ought to be scoured out of our minds if we want to create an enlightened society. I disagreed and reclaimed the word 'aggression' with a liberal dose of straightforward humor, whereupon it was suggested to me that (1) 'aggression' was the wrong word for what I was describing, and (2) I'd 'get it' eventually if I just kept working on myself. This while one of the men in the circle tittered and exchanged sidelong glances with another man as I spoke. Of course these responses were problematic, especially since much of the conversation was about the aggression, assertiveness and strength of women. But I understood them, coming as they did from basically good people at a Buddhist retreat who were working toward peace. Still, they reminded me of the reasons why I'm not a Buddhist.

Let me stir the pot a bit before I continue. This is a poem I wrote in 2008, which was published by Goblin Fruit and later appeared in The Ruin of Beltany Ring:

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Robyn Ryan
    Robyn Ryan says #
    The suppression of women in European culture is so absolute, I suspect it must have pre-euro-Christian roots. The seminal 'the ki
  • C.S. MacCath
    C.S. MacCath says #
    Possibly, though there are accounts of women who had status and myths (especially Celtic) that feature women of power. Still, I th
  • Robyn Ryan
    Robyn Ryan says #
    Logically, if women were the makers of things and life and shelter, they controlled society. I suspect men and semi-domesticated d
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Gee - that's what strong American women tell their men now!
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Once again, Ceallaigh, you have blown me away with the power and utter clarity of your writing. This is the best article on the u

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_fireplace1.jpgThis morning I started a pot of soup. The beef shanks came from a farm where the cows live on grass or hay and, during the summer at least, they spend their days outside in broad fields. The family that runs the farm has been raising and selling meat for a long time. They are all business in their farm store, perhaps even taciturn. But they are efficient, and their prices make up for any perceived grumpiness. But back to the soup…

The shanks get roasted in the oven and then left in the crock pot for a few hours to make stock (damn, I forgot to put in some onions! But there’s time for that.) Then the meat is picked off the bones, and set aside while veggies cook in the stock, and finally the meat goes back in. It’s a slow process. While I do have the capacity to whip up a quick meal – I keep organic frozen veggies handy and often take a day to make frozen entrees ahead of time – soup is just best if one takes some time.

The lush smell of it, the warmth on a single digit day, and the balance of flavors are all important, but the care that went into the making brings just at much to the table. It takes time and attention not just to make the soup, but to choose the ingredients. I’m picky about food. I want my food to be clean and grown by people who care. Some of it I grow myself because I love my garden and I do some canning and other food preservation because it saves us money. The soup is not just ingredients, it is time and labor, not just the act of making, but the labor that paid for the ingredients. How we spend our time and labor shows what we love.

 

And this is where it gets complicated.

 

 

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