Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Today is “Beer Day” in Iceland.  On this day in 1989 - yes, 1989- beer became legal in Iceland after a long and arduous struggle with prohibition.  This is the story of beer’s long journey through the Land of Fire and Ice.

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  • Kenq
    Kenq says #
    How very strange. The early 20th Century did terrible things to people's minds!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Diving Under Dark Waters

I can feel my neurons, they are a rapidly proliferating web of connections like mycelial network running through deep forest soil, intertwined with the roots of trees.

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tree of Sacrifice

The stang, or “Devil's Cross,” is the forked pole that, in Old Craft usage, represents the Horned.

It's a Tree of Life.

It's also a Tree of Death.

At the great temple of Uppsala in Sweden, they used to hang the bodies of sacrifices—strange and terrible fruit—from the trees of the sacred grove.

If you've ever seen the gutted carcass of a deer strung up from a branch to bleed out, you'll understand.

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Spotlight On: The Metaphysical Detective

Riga Hayworth is many things: a witch, an interpreter of dreams, a reader of tarot cards, and a private investigator. She is also a doting aunt to a teen niece who idolizes her and best friend to an ex-pat French gargoyle. And now she finds herself caught up in the strangest case of her strange career: trying to solve the murder of a woman who was apparently killed by her own long-dead husband, while trying to figure out how sexy and charismatic casino owner Donovan Mosse fits into the whole thing ....

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Warlockries

Yeah, I'm a warlock.

You got a problem with that?

“Witch,” though a gender-neutral term, is female first. So it's convenient to have a term that specifies: male of the species.

Warlock.

Interestingly, it's a Scots word in origin. (In Sassenach they say warlowe.) Maybe they had more problems with male witches North of the Border.

That's not surprising. Throughout the Norse culture sphere, the majority of witches have always been men. Most executed witches in Scandinavia were male.

No, I'm not a wizard, but that's a class difference. Wizards are gentry. Warlockry is for us yeomen.

Some Wiccans are allergic to the term. Since the number of men in Wicca has been waning away for years, maybe it's moot. But in Old Craft—where men still constitute a numerical majority—most of us are fine with “warlock.”

And no one denies that it's a word of power.

Some object on the grounds that it means “oath-breaker.”

Well, they're wrong.

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  • Mike W
    Mike W says #
    I agree with you Steve that the Witches/Warlocks were outsiders to the majority religions as sanctioned by society or the state.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    My contention would be that even back in pagan days, the witches and our ways were already outsiders, and that our worships didn't
  • Mike W
    Mike W says #
    Yes, I think that warlock is a great word for a male witch. For the view of a Feri Trad elder on this use see http://faerywolf.co
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Mab, you've made my day. I'm delighted to hear about the gender imbalance in your neck of the woods. (Around here, it's still the
  • Mab Nahash
    Mab Nahash says #
    I get that the meaning has changed in general parlance, but for those of us who take oaths as part of our practice of witchcraft,

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Pancake Moon

Consider the immemorial pancake.

Child of Earth, Sun, and Thunder, one of humanity's most ancient and sacred foods.

Every pancake is a charm, as round and golden as the Sun. Every one you eat brings Spring just a little closer. That's why this is pancake time, the arc of the year between the February cross-quarter and Spring Evenday.

The pancake incarnates differently in every cuisine, but in my opinion it reaches its apotheosis in the yeasted buckwheat pancakes of Russia, blini. They say that when you start the sponge for blini, you should take it out to the woods so that the full Moon can shine on it.

You can judge their antiquity by the name. Blini comes from the same ancient root that gave us mill, meal, and molar. From the same root also comes mallet, malleus (as in Malleus Maleficarum, “hammer of the 'witches'”), and Mjöllnir, the name of Þórr's thunder hammer: “crusher.” Really, there should be a shrine to Thunder in every flour-mill in the world.

Blini are one of the great sacred foods of the North. You serve them at sacred times: births, weddings, deaths.

And now: that final, axial arc of the year between winter and spring.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_retrotopia.jpg

Title: Retrotopia

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