Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Bealtaine in the Streets

If you've ever wondered what it would be like to experience a pagan holiday in a pagan city, well, you don't have to wait until your next incarnation to find out.

Just come to pagan Minneapolis for Bealtaine.

For 42 years, the magic and artistry of Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theater has brought the joy of May to Witch City. 50,000 people line Bloomington Avenue for the Parade and then follow it, dancing, in unbridled celebration of the Coming of the Sun and the melting of Winter's icy heart.

In Powderhorn Park, we call the Sun, which sails to us across the lake in its winged boat. By its power, the Tree of Life rises renewed, and the city-wide party begins.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Spring?

Spring is supposed to be about cavorting and frolicking through the new grass and flowers.  Except in my world, spring is about work.  It’s about being done with the fallow times of winter and moving forward with all the projects. 

Growing up on a farm, spring was spent walking through the fields, picking rocks, preparing the land for planting.  Now as an adult and no longer living on the farm, I find myself missing the distinctiveness of spring. 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Slaying the Seven-Headed Monster

Caution: Rant Alert

It's an arbitrary and artificial cycle without relation to the natural cycles of the world, an oppressive seven-headed monster.

I say, let's kill it. Death to the week!

Yes, I know that pagans invented it. (Since pagans invented just about everything, that's really no great shakes. Pagans invented slavery and genital mutilation too. Face it, they haven't all been winners.) Tart it up with pagan god-names if you like, but we are not fooled. The intrusive Roman proves it's a foreign import.

When Muhammad of Mecca (piss be upon him) was setting up Islam, he intentionally replaced the traditional solar-lunar calendar with a strictly lunar calendar that careened through the solar year like a drunken bicyclist. In this way he guaranteed that the holidays of his religion would never accrete any of those nasty (and inevitably paganizing) seasonal associations, as the holidays of Judaism and Christianity had. Well, you can't say he wasn't savvy.

Same deal with the week. That's why the Hebrew prophets denounced new moons and holidays and championed the Sabbath instead. Stop looking at the Sun and Moon to tell time; you don't need them. Look at the calendar instead. Why measure our lives by the cycles of nature when we've got this nice, convenient, man-made cycle instead?

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Undermining Western Civilization is a thankless task. But someone's got to do it.
  • Ian Phanes
    Ian Phanes says #
    The week is the child of the planetary hours technique for timing astrological magic. Don't you be dissing our timing system!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Signs of Spring

The week of the Spring Equinox, we got snow, lots of it: almost 2 feet feel in 12 hours, with a biting wind turning it into a full blown spring blizzard. Schools and offices were closed for 2 days, the roads were an icy mess, and it was really cold. It was hard, then, to start spring-cleaning or open the windows to invite in a freshening breeze. While snow poured into my flowerbeds, it didn’t feel appropriate to charge seeds, bless tools or prepare an offering to be left in swirl of icy snowflakes. Celebrating Ostara, regardless of what the calendar said, was the last thing on my mind.

Then, a few mornings later, I went outside, and things were...different. Yes it was cold, and the snow lingered on the lawn and had hardened into frozen slush in the street. But the cold air was not as sharp as I expected. In fact, there was a softness to it despite the chill. I could smell something too—something like soil or pollen, something almost floral. And unlike the stony silence of deep winter, with only the wind and traffic sounds in the air, I heard birds, I could hear several different trills and twees, and I noticed a froth of activity in my neighbors' cedar tree, as it was literally shaking with dozens of tiny gray wrens hopping in and out of its branches.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Glamour Isn't for Nice Girls*

I was taught how to be afraid and how to avoid danger with the understanding that it still may not do what I want it to do.  Never go to a bar or a club alone, never go home with a guy you just met because you might wind up in his refrigerator.  Travel in a pack of girls and you will keep each other as safe as anyone can.  You will protect each other from aggressive would-be suitors, bad half-drunk decisions and make sure no one wound up in the hospital.  

And we did do those things for each other and we kept each other safe.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Bobbisu
    Bobbisu says #
    I always have my girls to help me out. I know I f I need a one to help me. I know I can count on my girls
A Case for Radical, Progressive Paganism

 

When witchcraft first flourished in the 20th Century, it was cutting edge. Hot on the heels of the feminist movement, the fledgling environmental movement, and a time of great social upheaval, neo-paganism opened a whole new realm of possibility that at once called to our roots but also challenged dominant paradigms. At the same time, a lot of us are drawn to pagan beliefs when we ourselves undergo inter and intra-personal change. To dedicate yourself to a pagan path is a challenging step to take, and the journey is a difficult one. If it was easy - everyone would do it. To be a pagan is already a radical and progressive act. But is it enough? I'd like to offer my own interpretation of what radical, progressive paganism can look like.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Ian Chandler
    Ian Chandler says #
    Thanks for the stimulating article and comments. Paganism is such a 'big tent' encompassing so many different beliefs and practice
  • Christopher Blackwell
    Christopher Blackwell says #
    Like most everything else in Paganism it is a matter of personal choice. If it ceases to be a choice than what good is it?
  • Peregrin
    Peregrin says #
    Hi Jon ... we are living in different 'Paganisms'. Lee clear says she rights "from the point of view of a progressive witch living
  • Jön Upsal's Gardener
    Jön Upsal's Gardener says #
    The irony of this post astounds me. The fact that you are really blind to its irony astounds me even more. Show me a neopaganism
  • Lee Pike
    Lee Pike says #
    As Peregrin mentions, the views I express here are totally relevant to the climate I'm familiar with. Maybe it is different where
How You Can Pray Your Way to a Firmer, Shapelier Butt (and a Few Other Things Besides)

You could call it the Threefold Salute.

In my head. On my lips. In my heart. (Touch brow, mouth, chest.) Or the other way: In my heart. On my lips. In my head. Up the tree or down?

It's a formal greeting. It's a ritual salute. In body language, it says: So mote it be.

When you enter a sacred space, pause at the threshold. Bend and touch the ground. (If you can't actually touch the ground from this position, at least reach for it.) As you straighten your spine, standing up, touch heart, lips, head. Then enter.

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