Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Should We Scrap the Word 'Magic'?

It's fascinating to note that the Anglo-Saxon Hwicce, the original Tribe of Witches, had no word for 'magic.'

Instead, they had numerous words denoting different kinds of magic. At this remove of time, we can often no longer distinguish clearly between them

Bealcræft, 'bale-craft': magic intended to harm.

Drýcræft, 'druid (?)-craft': Possibly, druid magic. Specifically what kind of magic the Anglo-Saxons believed the druids to have practiced, we no longer know.

Dwimorcræft: 'dwimmer-craft': Necromancy (?)

Dwolcræft, 'dwele-craft': Apparently, magic intended to mislead or cause confusion.

Galdorcræft, 'galder-craft': Sung magic.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    "Parthenogenetrix" is one of my own favorites.
  • Karena
    Karena says #
    I curtsy in your direction- parthenogenetrix is lovely! And so much less rare than one would be led to believe, LOL!
  • Karena
    Karena says #
    I'm not so sure. Although the word encompasses a number of experiences and intents, & isn't terribly specific, I think it might st
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    I, too, have always used the word spellcraft, together with the word ethical. As always, thanks for this.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Me too, Critter. Amazing word, 'spellcraft.' 1400 years, and it's still pronounced the same, and means the same thing.

Dominique SmithNo, this is not the United States.

This is Canada.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Shawn Sanford Beck
    Shawn Sanford Beck says #
    Greeting friend, I'm wondering if there's anything I can do to help with this campaign. I'm a ChristoPagan, and a priest in the A
  • Durantia None
    Durantia None says #
    This is definitely a hate crime. The failure of the Winnipeg Police Service to address this issue violates her constitutional righ
  • Kenq
    Kenq says #
    I was stunned to learn that there is no legal recognition for Pagans in Canada. We've had it here in the states since I think the
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Doesn't Canada have laws against vandalism? Why waste time with hate crime stuff when there is obvious and repeated vandalism goi
  • Sable Aradia
    Sable Aradia says #
    Oh yes, there are laws against all of that. But the police don't spend a great deal of effort investigating and prosecuting rando

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Wanted: A Good Word for 'Energy'

It flows through everything.

Everything is made from it.

Energy.

But how do you say that in Pagan?

“Energy” is a word from the vocabulary of science, which is no bad thing in and of itself.

But I would contend that for so primal a concept, we need a primal word.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I was able to dig out a copy of the book. The word the author uses was Ruach not roika. Apparently roika is a word my subconscio
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Doesn't sound Yiddish to me. A quick web-search turns up nothing relevant; I'm guessing that it's made-up. Not that there's anythi
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I'm reasonably sure it's not Yiddish. It might have been coined by that guy who invented Anthroposophy, but I'm not sure. I gues
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Hmm. I speak Modern Hebrew and read Biblical Hebrew, and I can tell you that it doesn't look Hebrew to me.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I think the author said he got it from the Hebrew.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Today is “Beer Day” in Iceland.  On this day in 1989 - yes, 1989- beer became legal in Iceland after a long and arduous struggle with prohibition.  This is the story of beer’s long journey through the Land of Fire and Ice.

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Recent comment in this post - Show all comments
  • Kenq
    Kenq says #
    How very strange. The early 20th Century did terrible things to people's minds!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Diving Under Dark Waters

I can feel my neurons, they are a rapidly proliferating web of connections like mycelial network running through deep forest soil, intertwined with the roots of trees.

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tree of Sacrifice

The stang, or “Devil's Cross,” is the forked pole that, in Old Craft usage, represents the Horned.

It's a Tree of Life.

It's also a Tree of Death.

At the great temple of Uppsala in Sweden, they used to hang the bodies of sacrifices—strange and terrible fruit—from the trees of the sacred grove.

If you've ever seen the gutted carcass of a deer strung up from a branch to bleed out, you'll understand.

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Spotlight On: The Metaphysical Detective

Riga Hayworth is many things: a witch, an interpreter of dreams, a reader of tarot cards, and a private investigator. She is also a doting aunt to a teen niece who idolizes her and best friend to an ex-pat French gargoyle. And now she finds herself caught up in the strangest case of her strange career: trying to solve the murder of a woman who was apparently killed by her own long-dead husband, while trying to figure out how sexy and charismatic casino owner Donovan Mosse fits into the whole thing ....

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