Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Magic of the Labyrinth

I recently began building my own labyrinth in the back yard of our RV long-term parking spot in the mobile home village where we currently live.  It is my way of creating my own sacred space. The photo above shows it now currently under construction.  I am making the construction an act of meditation, as I find an add stones two or three at a  time.  I think when it is complete, it will likely be time to move!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

A few days ago, Shirl Sazynski (author of the awesome One-Eyed Cat blog here at PS) recommended a new science fiction novel that she was enjoying: Fortune's Pawn by Rachel Bach. While I read a lot of sf, I don't read much military sf, but this sounded interesting. So, I clicked over to B&N and scrolled through the customer reviews.

Most of the reviews were quite positive. One negative review caught my eye, though -- not because it was negative, but because of the anonymous reviewer's reason for giving Fortune's Pawn a single star: 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

When your doubts overwhelm
When you act out your fears
When failure drags you down
Call on Magni, son of Thor

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Yesterday we celebrated Mabon over at the Broomstix Blog with a fantastic coloring page to print out by artist Robin Ator:

b2ap3_thumbnail_Corn-Dollie-Image.jpg

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

The Jewish year 5775 begins at sundown tonight (Wednesday). In Hebrew, “new year” is r'osh ha-shana: literally, “head [of] the year.” Interestingly, the Arabic term for “new year” is the same: r'as as-sana. Clearly this expression goes back a long, long way, possibly even to Proto-Semitic times. In any event, the phrase long predates monotheism. One should probably posit an Arabic—possibly Moorish—origin for the Italian word for “new year,” capodanno. Three guesses what that means literally.

New Moon” in Hebrew is r'osh hodesh, literally (you guessed it) “head of the month.” Why would the head of something come to mean its beginning?

I can think of two possibilities.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
What I used to miss about Christianity

Over Mabon weekend I read Niki Whitings thoughts on what she misses about being a Christian as well as Jason Mankey’s andJohn Halstead’s posts on what they don’t miss. I asked myself how I felt about this as I went to three different Mabon celebrations. How does my new life as a Pagan compare?

 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Gwion Raven
    Gwion Raven says #
    "I am grateful to have a religion that values music, and ecstatic states of being. I do wish music was a bigger part of our ritual
  • Annika Mongan
    Annika Mongan says #
    Gwion, I agree, AND I would love to have more music, including longer songs from shared songbooks :-)
  • Jason Leslie Rogers
    Jason Leslie Rogers says #
    Annika, Thank you for this post, for sharing your heart. Your timing is impeccable (perhaps synchronicitous is a better word). I
  • Annika Mongan
    Annika Mongan says #
    Thanks for the comment, Jason. It's a really tough transition to make, but in the end, totally worth it. I spent some time in the
  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    So wonderful to be in community with you!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Thinking in Story

If you ask those who practice it, “Why skyclad?” twelve will get you thirteen you'll hear something along the lines of 1) energy flow, 2) social equalizing, and 3) a sense of separation from the ordinary.

Those may all be good answers, and they may even be true answers, but they're modern answers. They're not the answers the ancestors would have given.

If 1400 years ago you had asked a priest of the Hwicce tribe, “Why do you go naked to your worship?” had he been disposed to give you an answer at all he may well have said, “The Lady of the Hwicce instructed us so.”

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  • Greybeard
    Greybeard says #
    If only we would listen, indeed. Blessings.

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