Culture Blogs

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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Race and Paganism

“Racism is a problem CREATED BY white people and BLAMED ON people of color.” 

- Waking Up White, Debby Irving

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  • Cairril Adaire
    Cairril Adaire says #
    I hear you. It doesn't seem comfortable to say beforehand, "I have studied with a tribal elder," but do we feel that way because o
  • JudithAnn
    JudithAnn says #
    I think I understand the question because I am in the same place. I am only two generations removed from my immigrant grandparents
  • Cairril Adaire
    Cairril Adaire says #
    I would like a brown or black person to respond to this, but off the top of my head I think we just need to be as honest as we can
  • Felicia
    Felicia says #
    What if one is trying to reclaim a bit of their heritage but, because of mixing, doesn't obviously look like they have that heri

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Turn up the Heat and Chill Out

Imbolc is a natural time for contemplation and quietude. The weather often compels us indoors and forces us to slow down and partake in some sort of hibernation. If we stay this way for too long however, restlessness and boredom can set in. How does one cope with extreme temperatures and no waiting plane ticket to sunnier climates in sight? Sometimes even simulated heat is better than none.

On those winter nights that you're feeling chilled to the bone, turning up the heat and meditating could be just what is needed to help in biding your time until spring. Don't be afraid to boost it enough to break a sweat. Yes, it's an indulgence, but you can always turn it down to normal right after. Bundle up, put on your heaviest wrap-around scarf, wool hat, leg warmers, arm warmers, fuzzy socks, and fashion a Snuggie-worthy blanket around the back of your shoulders. Prop yourself up on too many comfy pillows.

Before you get completely settled in though, light your favorite scented candle, dim all the lights and light some relaxing incense as well, preferably something such as "Tranquility," by Essential Essences, with lavender mixed in. Likewise, heat up a lavender and chamomile Anti-Stress Comfort Wrap, such as the one from Earth Therapeutics to drape over your shoulders.

A Himalayan salt lamp is a great tool for assisting on nights such as these, and has been known to help in removing toxins, stale energy, and even allergens out of the dry air, as well. Speaking as one prone to allergies, I noticed a difference immediately. Turn on your favorite soft-voiced guided mediation or mood music, or tune in to the white noise of a radiator, wood burning stove, or fireplace, if you're lucky enough to have one in your home.

Breathe deep and give yourself a good 20-30 minutes to completely relax, recharge your energies and realign your chakras – there's a nifty guided meditation to do just that at the end of this article. Breathe in the positive and let go/breathe out that which no longer serves you. When you feel that you have reached your optimum peaceful state of mind, express gratitude to the Goddesses and Gods for the unique opportunity to take the time to do this exercise. Finish with a cup of hot brewed herbal tea, and sprinkle a few drops out on your back porch in offering to Mother Nature.

Leave the salt lamp on for the night and take note of the interesting dreams that you may remember in the morning. And don't forget to turn down the heat again!


“Yoga Pose Shows Exercise Wellbeing And Health” by Stuart Miles from

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Sown Seeds & Garden Dreams at Imbolc

No one loves Imbolc as much as me. Well, okay, that’s probably not true but this point on the wheel of the year is one of my favorites. As an avid gardener, I may in fact savor it even more than Ostara. By the time spring equinox rolls around, new life is everywhere--birds back from southern points, baby bunnies peeking out of shrubs, early spring flowers blooming. At Imbolc, it’s still at least part dream, and a beautiful dream at that! When we walk into the woods, the kids notice that in some spots the ground is no longer crunchy and frozen under foot.There are little patches of green, likely the hairy bittercress and henbit that will soon make neighboring lawn fanatics crazy. The cold world is gradually warming and stirring, ready to come back to life before long.


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  • Carl Neal
    Carl Neal says #
    I love Imbolc as well! We will make crosses tonight and I will start my favored seeds tomorrow. Bright Blessings!!!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
In Search of Nightshade

Gee: Witchcraft. Medieval England. Lots of gay sex.

Sounds like the perfect novel.

I thought that the title was Nightshade, but if so, repeated web-searches have yet to turn up any sign of it.

Setting: medieval England. Our hero: hot, sexy, dark. (Is he really a wrongfully-dispossessed nobleman's son—à la Robin Hood—or am I just making that up?) Gay as a goose, of course. Travels all over Ye Merry Olde, having lots of adventures—hem, hem—with lots of cute, willing guys.

Oh, but the true love of his life—the one he keeps coming back to—is the eponymous Nightshade, the beautiful boy back home, apprentice to the village witch.

Plot? I'm sure there was one. No doubt the old witch dies and our hero (I don't even remember his name: probably something terse and monosyllabic like Dirk) eventually manages to save young Nightshade from the evil witch-hunters.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Go ahead and write it yourself. Follow wherever your muse leads you. If the result morphs into a gay leather stocking story set i
  • Thesseli
    Thesseli says #
    I want to read that book!

This is addressing the second part of a question posed to me (the first part of the question is found here). The questioner asked:

"Sometimes [crystals]  jump from my hand or I drop another crystal on them accidentally, etc. I am brand new at this and don't know how to proceed. Thank you" - K. S.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs


Have you heard? Apparently, it’s a Super-Duper Blue Blood Moon Leo Lunar Eclipse and we’re all gonna die! Again! While having great sex!

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Horse and Hattock

In 1662 Scottish witch Isobel Gowdie reported using this incantation before riding off to the sabbat:

Horse and hattock, in [Old Hornie's] name!

It is worth noting that this phrase, as it stands, conforms to the standard four-beat line of Old English poetry, its two half-lines bound together by alliteration: the meter, for instance, of Beowulf. This, no doubt, we may ascribe to coincidence.

She also reports a longer version of the same incantation, in the form of a rhymed couplet:

Horse and hattock, horse and go,

horse and pellatis, ho ho!

The Craft has always been characterized by mysteriousness and practicality in equal measures, and we see the same principle in operation here.

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