Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Pantheacon and Leadership

It seems that Pantheacon gives me writer’s block. My first year it took me three weeks to write about the convention. My second year I eventually gave up and wrote about something else instead. After this, my third Pantheacon, I spent two weeks waiting, typing and deleting, and then waiting again.

 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Annika Mongan
    Annika Mongan says #
    “Don't read the comments” was one of my ribbons at Pantheacon - but I did, and while I will not respond to everything that was sai
  • Greg Harder
    Greg Harder says #
    The Parliament is a huge event that usually has over 10.000 people attending. The problem is the organizers have a small overworke
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    http://witchesandpagans.com/pagan-studies-blogs/witch-at-large/response-to-blog-about-pagan-leadership.html
  • Crystal Blanton
    Crystal Blanton says #
    Great insights to complex topics. I am still dealing with the fallout that comes with leadership, and yet I get reminders every no
  • Annika Mongan
    Annika Mongan says #
    Thanks, Crystal. Leadership really is about service. It's odd and exciting to have joined a community that is going through growin
I'm Back, and I'm Bionic!

Dear friends and patient readers, I am sorry to have neglected you for so long. But the cause has been a good one! Three decades ago, I injured one knee, and four arthroscopies, lots of PT, and a good deal of pain later, it was time to give up and have the total knee replacement that had been planting itself securely in my path for the last several years.

I spent the latter part of autumn in aggressive physical therapy and preparation for the procedure. The surgery itself was in early December, and I've been rehabbing ever since. I'm doing very (very!) well, but this is a challenging surgery to have and to recover from-- lots of hard work involved. Much pain to be pushed through. I also returned to work months earlier than most people do after TKR; I'm a teacher, and I wasn't willing to be separated from my students for months. So, I gritted my teeth and was back at work only 4.5 weeks after surgery (for reference, most people don't return until 4-6 months postop).

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Cross-Legged God

The god who sits cross-legged: you know Who I mean. The position is central to the iconography of the Horned, in art both ancient and modern. In Old Craft symbolism, the Master may be represented by the skull of a horned animal with two longbones crossed beneath it. If Witchdom had pirates (!), I suppose that's what they'd fly on their flags. The Lord of the Red Bones, above and below.

Even in images such as Lévi's Baphomet and the Gundestrup Antlered, where the god is seated in a position not fully “tailor seat” (as we used to call it), his crossed or bent legs at least allude to the fully cross-legged seat. It's well worth asking what this pose can tell us about the god.

Nature. Civilized people (and their gods) sit on furniture. Barbarians sit on the ground, and cross-legged is the natural way to do so. This is an untamed god, a god in touch with the powers of nature, drawing strength and stability from the Earth.

Duality. The iconography of the Horned lord is dominated by doubling, and this speaks deeply to His nature. He is both Dark and Light, Lord of life and death, the master driven by his own internal contradictions. (Whereas Wicca tends to read duality in terms of male-female pairing, Old Craft generally looks to the divided self for the primal articulation of Twoness.) Just as his legs cross beneath him, so too do the two sides of his self cross and intersect with one another, the basis of his Being.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

As with every year, this year’s Pantheacon offered too rich a menu of workshops and performances for any of us to see all we wanted. This year I was lucky. Several of my favorite Pagan singers (and wonderful people as well) offered back-to-back performances, and I was able to see them all. Ruth Barrett and Holly Tannen  were prominent Pagan minstrels and bards when I first entered our community back in 1984.

    b2ap3_thumbnail_Ruth-serious.jpg b2ap3_thumbnail_Holly-Tannen.jpg

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Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, What is Glamour After All?

One of the charming comments I've gotten elsewhere is that my definition of glamour magic is wrong.  Super cool know more than me about a magic that is very rarely written about and that you can tell me how to do the magic that’s already working for me in my life.

Still.  I figured it would be best to clear things up.  Merriam-Webster gives two definitions:

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DOUBLE TERMINATED CRYSTAL - energy which flows in both directions

This week we’ll discuss the metaphysical properties of Double Terminated quartz crystals; what they are, how to determine if you have one, and how to work with their unique energy. We discussed crystal Clusters in an earlier post. We mentioned at that time that there are some crystals which don't grow on a matrix, they basically grow from a "seed" of silicon dioxide in clay. That is what we'll discuss in this blog post: Double Terminated crystals.

double terminated pointsDouble Terminated crystals have a termination on both ends. The point or end of the crystal is called the termination. It is confusing to refer to a single crystal as a “point” and to also call the end of a single crystal the “point,” so we call the pointy end a "termination".

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Peggy Frye
    Peggy Frye says #
    Thank you - very informative blog. I certainly have a real crystal ball (my husband is a geologist and is envious)...it's actuall
  • Genn John
    Genn John says #
    Hey Peggy! Thanks for the question... It's a great one! I'm really happy to hear that you were able to connect with this sphere..
  • Peggy Frye
    Peggy Frye says #
    I have a question. I just recently (in the past two days) started to read your blog. I have never worked with crystals before.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_space-witch.JPG

In my previous post I talked about how I was contacted by the director of pastoral services at Duke University Hospital.  Once a month, the chapel invites speakers from various faith traditions to talk to doctors, nurses, social workers, and other hospital staff.  The director had contacted me almost a year ago, asking me to give a short presentation focusing on a Pagan perspective on health, healing, life, and death. 

 

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