Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Glamour Isn't Pretty

As many of you know, Jow and I take our shop, The Mermaid & The Crow on the road, primarily to Pride events and Punk Rock events.  While there are winsome Ladies of Certain Age with their silver hair dyed in glam unicorn pastels and young families with children with spiky hair and capes, the primary group of people who attend these events are Youngs.  More specifically, Young Women most often.  We've been doing these events for years now, so I've become accustomed to seeing these two legged gazelles with perfect skin romping in rompers like some kind of crazy rite that Pan would be thrilled to have.  They are lovely and, I think, lovelier than I was at their age because now everyone has Invisalign, a dermatologist and a far better diet.

Here's the thing.

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  • Tacy West
    Tacy West says #
    I agree. I was in my 20's during the flower people, hippie, nature worshipers era and we were beautiful then due to diet before

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
World's Shortest Ritual

In ritual, it's always best when words and action reinforce one another.

Here's one of my favorite libation formulas: quick, no nonsense, easy. In English and her sister languages, to refer to someone as "my + (name)" is a gesture of affectionate intimacy.

 

Drink this (name of libation) with me,

my (name of deity),

and I will drink with You.

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Asking and Other Things I Hate

 

I am a fairly published . . . author. I still have trouble calling myself that, there's so much expectation with that word but I have a book coming out with one of the oldest publishers in the U.S. and a stack of anthologies that I write for regularly.

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Slow Loris: Experiencing the World of Smell

The Slow Loris (Nycticebus coucang) moves at a leisurely pace through the forests of Southeast Asia. With her slow and steady hand-over-hand movements, Slow Loris deliberately goes from tree top to tree top. Since She often hangs upside down as well, naturalists first believed that Slow Loris was a relative of the sloth of the Americas. Instead, She is a prosimian, a forerunner of monkeys.

As an omnivore, Slow Loris feeds on leaves, insects and small lizards. Using her keen sense of smell, She hunts at night for insects that are poisonous to many animals. Following the scent trail, Slow Loris tracks the insect. Moving unhurriedly, She sneaks up on her victim unnoticed. Then holding onto one branch with her hind foot, Slow Loris quietly reaches out and grabs her prey with her fingers.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Tama Witch

What is written in Earth, endures.

What the Lake receives, she keeps.

 

At 14, he climbed down the cliff. On the beach, he built a fire.

He stripped off his clothes.

I AM A WITCH, he wrote, in capitals: in the wet sand between shore and water, for the Lake to take.

He swam out, into the wind, as far as he could. Then he turned and swam back to shore.

He dried himself at the fire. He dressed and climbed back up.

He went back home.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_ww-boat.jpg

 

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Elf-Shine

They call it “elf-shine.”

I've seen it; I'm sure that you have, too.

It's the beauty that shines from someone in those moments of great joy or deep understanding: an illumination from within.

The ancestors of Northwestern Europe accounted the elves as the most beautiful of peoples, and so this beauty is named for them: for the shine of elf-shine—in Old English, ælf-scýne—is kin to German schön, “beautiful.”

“Beautiful as an elf,” the ancestors used to say.

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