Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_Lion-love.jpgCourage. Generosity. Love. Creativity. Leadership. These are all attributes of Leo, and this month we have an opportunity to express these qualities ourselves and use them to change our lives, and — to whatever extent we can — to change our world.  

The Leo New Moon falls on August 2nd at 4:46 PM. and gives us a blueprint for the month ahead. Leo epitomizes the drive for self-expression and creativity, yet the sign is not as self-centered as many think. An artist must have an audience, and an awakened Leo deeply appreciates each member of that audience as a unique and treasured expression of the human spirit.

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Lammas: The Ancient Heritage of Grains

The harvest holidays of paganism are great times to celebrate the gifts that plants give to all of us in the ecosystem. Grains have been a mainstay of the human (and pre-human) diet throughout our evolution. Studies of the early populations in Africa as long as 105 000 years ago show a diet sustained heavily by sorghum. Plants have been found on the grinding tools of several Paleolithic excavations. Evidence of starchy grains on the teeth of Neanderthals has been found from the Mediterranean to throughout Europe. There is even evidence that these early proto-humans learned to cook these plant foods.

 

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Your mention of sorghum reminded me of traveling with my family as a teenager back in the 70's. We would sometimes stop at roadsi

b2ap3_thumbnail_dawe.jpg

Title: Spirit Touched: A Caleyna Summoner Tale

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Postmaster Announces New Pagan Holiday Stamps

AP: Washington, DC

The Postmaster General announced today the upcoming release of a series of stamps commemorating the eight holidays celebrated by the vast majority of contemporary pagans.

"Pagans have been an integral part of this nation since its founding and before," said Postmaster Tamar Penrose, acting head of the US Postal Service. "It's time and high time for such a public acknowledgement."

The stamps will be released later this year on November 1, the ancient Celtic holiday of Samhain, celebrated by many contemporary pagans as their New Year.

The release coincides with the opening of the Smithsonian's new exhibit, "Pagan America: The First 400 Years." The exhibit will include the unveiling of the original prototypes for the stamps.

The prototypes were created by the Minneapolis Collective of Pagan Artists (MCPA) which, since its founding in 2013, has spearheaded the mainstreaming of pagan art and culture into American consciousness. It was the MCPA that first vetted the idea to the Postal Service.

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  • Mike Denning
    Mike Denning says #
    A real stamp though. http://www.collectgbstamps.co.uk/explore/years/?year=1981 By the way did the American readers really miss t
  • Dawn Love
    Dawn Love says #
    I believe a lot of us just got so excited by the headline of the post we didn't look closely at the picture until the obvious (and
  • Lokisgodhi
    Lokisgodhi says #
    Steven Posch, I must protest! It's just sick and wrong to ever apologize for duping feeble minded morons who were taken in by a g
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    First, my thanks to everyone who took the time to read and comment. Clearly, I need to get out of the Broomstick Ghetto more (but
  • Dawn Love
    Dawn Love says #
    The "joke" is funnier when everyone is in on it. Using a reference so obscure that newer Pagans possibly won't understand it is ex

In the ancient days of the world, when all was still mostly froth and chaos, there lived two great Kings.  The Oak King was the ruler of the places that were light, and the Holly King ruled the places that were dark.  At first They feared one another; for the Holly King was the master of the places that the Oak King dared not go, and the Oak King was the master of the places that the Holly King dared not go.  What secrets might the other be keeping?  But the Goddess of the Moon and Stars knew Them both, and She bade Them to go to one another.  “You’ll like Him!” She told each of Them with the twinkle of the stars in Her deep dark eyes.  “You’ll see!”

So They agreed to meet at the border of Twilight, where light and dark meet.  The Goddess guided Them to the meeting place with the twinkles of Her eyes, and then She tactfully withdrew.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Sacred River of the Witches

If you look at a map of England, you'll see on the southwestern side of the island, between Cornwall and Wales, a large waterway reaching inland from the Atlantic. This is the Estuary (in Witch, it would be “Firth”) of the River Severn.

The Severn, Britain's longest river, is traditionally considered a “female” river, its patron deity a goddess.

In its valley and throughout its watershed there dwelt, some 1300 years ago, the Anglo-Saxon tribe known as the Hwicce, from whom, some would say, derive the witches of today. And indeed, plenty of witches still live along the Lady Severn, though most of us now live elsewhere.

In any given landscape, the names of the largest rivers will always give access to the oldest reachable underlying linguistic substratum. (Think of the Mississippi, Ojibwe for “Big River.”) And so it is for the Severn.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Time of the Mother

We call it Lammas or Lunasa, and think of it as marking the commencement of the grain harvest.

And so indeed it does. In Western Minnesota, they're beginning the cutting of the “small grains” even as you read this.

But here in the New World, this was a festival long before the ships from Europe arrived with their sacks of seed wheat and barley.

“Green Corn,” they called it, and among many peoples, it was the greatest feasting of the year.

Maize cultivation came into Northern America from Mexico about 2000 years ago, and spread up along the river valleys. In the Upper Mississippi Valley, where I live, they've kept Green Corn for almost 1000 years now.

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  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Yep. There's Betty Windsor up there on the right. Pagan holiday stamps: may we live to see them.
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Love that postage stamp at the top of the page. I'm guessing it's English.

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