Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
White Snow, Black Branch, Red Bird

Sunday morning, February 15th, 6:55 a. m. I've just heard a sound I haven't heard since before Samhain. That's why I'm wearing this silly (my father would say “shit-eating”) grin.

Birdsong.

Here in southern Minnesota we're back in deep freeze. After an all-too-brief Bridey's Spring, the interstellar cold has returned, deep space cold, the cold between the stars. In a landscape drained of color and sound, Winter reigns Interminable.

Then suddenly a red bird sings outside the window, and spring seems possible.

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  • Anne Forrester
    Anne Forrester says #
    Gods, did this make me happy. What Cheer! What Cheer!

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Witch Who Decided to Leave the Craft

There was once a young witch who fell in love with a cowan, and they decided to marry.

Now, in those days people felt strongly that if you married out, you had to leave the Craft. But there you were, it was love and no price seemed too high. The date was set, the banns were read. On the chosen day, the church filled up with people and the witch and her intended stood before the altar.

But just as the priest is about to pronounce them man and wife, crash! the door flies open and a broom comes sailing in. First it knocks the old priest over the head, then it chases the boy out of the building, and next thing you know, there it is again, back for more. Everyone was terrified, and they all got out of there as fast as they could.

So they picked another date, and the banns were read for a second time. The church fills up with even more people, come to see the fun, and the service begins. But this time, just before they start, they lock the door.

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Kiss of the Green Man

“What do you know about the Green Man?”

Jim isn't pagan, but his husband, who is, told him that I was the one to talk to. In my pagan arrogance, I could understand why he would be interested in the Green Man. What I couldn't understand was why he should be so interested.

I rattled on for a while about late Roman Bacchic motifs and medieval sculpture, clearly missing the point entirely. Finally I trailed off and asked the question I should have asked first.

“Why do you ask?” I asked him. Thank Goddess.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
My Funny Valentine

I realize that many folks feel jaded about Valentine's Day. They see only the commercialized over-production number of it, and forget all about Lupercalia and the mating season for wolves. Perhaps simply because of those latter two facts, I do appreciate the day. It wasn't literally invented by Hallmark in the 20th Century, like Sweetest Day, for Goddess' sake. It can in fact be old-fashioned and sweet – if you enjoy it on your own terms. Please don't let anyone pressure you into dragging your honey to "Fifty Shades of Vanilla," or to blow hundreds at a 10-course meal at the trendiest restaurant, simply because it's the thing to do. In fact, why not do something totally unconventional:

Why not host an old-fashioned Valentine's Day party? You could send out the cute invites to people you'd like to join you – like the ones you exchanged in elementary school. Build some anticipation and surprise about the event. Don't create a page on Facebook. Do it old-school. Don't let anyone know who else will be there ahead of time.

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If You Kill Someone in a Dream, Does That Make You a Murderer?

If you break a taboo in a dream, does it count?

What the dream itself was about, I don't even remember. What I do recall is that as I turned to leave, and was going out through the door, I stepped directly onto the threshold.

Thresholds, like hearths, are loci of sanctity. The threshold of every building is inherently sacred, even the thresholds of non-sacred buildings like stores. In the old days, they would bury the foundation offerings beneath them, and in traditional cultures they continue to be places of sacrifice. A threshold is a god's place. They say that the Horned, god of the In-Between, sits on every threshold; it is his sacred place in every building, large or small, sacred or secular. Whenever you enter or leave a building, it's an encounter with a god. Welcome to the pagan universe.

So it's bad to step on a threshold. (One steps over a threshold, not on it.) Not bad as in murdering someone, but bad as in pissing toward the Sun; it's rude, a ritual violation that puts you out of synch with the Powers. It's important to be in synch with the Powers; our people have always felt so.

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  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    I sometimes get the clear impression that a dream infraction is a suppressed guilt from another life, or from an earlier time in t

Better Call Saul!, the highly anticipated Breaking Bad spinoff that scored the best premiere ratings in cable TV history, was really, really depressing.  That’s OK.  It had to be.  Bob Odenkirk’s characterization of Heisenberg’s crooked lawyer was so fascinating that the most compelling aspect of this new prequel was the character’s back story.  Much like Walter White had to do in Breaking Bad, Saul Goodman needed to hit rock bottom in order to turn his life around.

But then, “turning your life around” is a relative term.  We know from the original show that both characters end up making significantly more money than they start with.  Yet what does that success get them?  We also know from Breaking Bad that both characters live a life of constant struggle to stay ahead of the law, ahead of the drug cartels, ahead of Albuquerque’s criminal underworld.  They never get a moment to rest and enjoy the wealth that they create.  The loneliness is painted vividly in the new show's ads:

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
LokiMuse

Recently I had a friend ask me what it was like to write with Loki. I've been mentally chewing on this for a bit, simply because I don't know if I can describe it as a process - I've had people ask me for years "where do you get the ideas from?" and my answer is that I have no idea; they just show up.

Loki, as His shell character, just showed up. I didn't spend any time making a character worksheet for Him. I didn't have to ask Him any of His likes, dislikes, fears, desires, or strengths; I just knew them. I knew Him, and that knowing was so completely natural that I didn't even question it.

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  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    Love this. Those of us who love Loki and work with "them" as partner in creativity just have to let it be whatever it is.

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