Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Getting a Real Charge

The Charge of the Goddess is Doreen Valiente's masterpiece, incontestably the best of its kind.

In fact, the Charge has single-handedly created its own literary genre. Modern paganism's hodgepodge of gods, few of whom many of us grew up knowing about, has made the charge—a "self-description of a deity"—a liturgical necessity.

Note that the pagan use of the term, though, departs significantly from its original use in Freemasonry, where it means, essentially, "a list of instructions." Although the divine monologue was known in late antiquity—Classicist R. E. Witt would call it an "aretalogy"—Valiente's Charge is the Great Mother of all modern charges.

Think of the other charges that you know.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    Brilliant indeed! As always. A copy is going into the San Quentin Wiccan Circle Binder of Shadows.
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    Proud to be part of it: thanks!
  • tehomet
    tehomet says #
    Brilliant.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
The Summerland of the Snows

Regular readers of this blog no doubt ask themselves from time to time: So, is Paganistan really the matchless Summerland of the Snows that Posch makes it out to be? (Paganistan is the Secret Witch Name of the 13-county Minneapolis-St. Paul metropagan area.)

Well, shown above is a sign that I saw while driving to work this morning. It's 4 blocks from my house.

You decide.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Songs of the Northern Tribes

In support of Gaia Gathering: the Canadian National Pagan Conference, thirteen artists have come together to create an anthology of Canadian Pagan music and spoken word.  Only available online, this album spans thirty years and includes some of the best of out-of-print Pagan classics as well as some up-and-comers.  All artists have donated the use of their work: all profits from the sale of the album go directly to support the Conference.

Featured artists: Vanessa Cardui, Tara Rice, the Ancient Gods, JD Hobbes, Brendan Myers, Dano Hammer, the Dragon Ritual Drummers, Gallows Hill, Heather Dale, Tamarra James, Raven's Call, Sable Aradia,and Parnassus (Chalice & Blade).

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Taking a Slitch

You know the song I mean. The one that begins:

Let the joyous news be spread....

Just to refresh your memory: first, the house begins to pitch. Then the kitchen takes a slitch, and lands on the wicked witch. In the middle of a ditch, no less. How humiliating.

It had been raining off and on for a week before we got to the festival site, and there were mud slicks everywhere. A friend of ours came limping into camp, clearly a little the worse for wear.

"What happened to you?" someone asked.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Lines in the Sand

Lines drawn in the sand, or in my case on the road.  There is a place on my drive to work where the road is wide enough for two lanes though it isn’t marked that way.  At one point, there are yellow lines on the road to mark the beginning of a left turn lane.  Even though there is nothing in the road to stop it, people change over to the right lane, then move back into the left lane to make their turn. 

This always makes me chuckle.  You can clearly see there is nothing in the road, if you just keep moving forward over the top of those yellow lines, you would be in the left turn lane.  Yet daily, people follow the lines that push them into the right lane before they switch back to make their left turn.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Fix Your Situation

Let’s review:

Q. Are you being cursed or hexed?

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Bigghes: or, The Lost Treasure of the Witches

In my previous post about Old English béag, "ring, arm-ring, neck-ring, torc, crown," I was utterly remiss not to have mentioned what is perhaps the word's most obvious link with modern witchcraft.

The fairly obscure Gardnerian term bigghes refers to the High Priestess' parure, i.e. her matched set of jewelry: wristlets, necklace, crown. (Parure. Good old English: we really do have a word for everything. And if we don't, we just pick one up from someone else. Small wonder it's the sacred language of the witches.) The kinship with the Old English word is obvious.

Survival or revival? Wicca being a child of the 20th century, the latter seems indicated here. What it does show is that those early witches were doing their research.

Just as we still do today.

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