Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

I jumped through the window after him.  It was a graceless and slow process but one I completed nonetheless.  There was still blood in my hair, my breath smelled of absinthe and Death in the Afternoon and I clutched my protective locket.   I had somehow managed to lose an hour, an entire loop, like a waking dream.  Back at The McKittrick for another Sleep No More Experience.

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LINEATED FACES - To Reach Deeper Levels in Meditation

Last week we discussed Lineated Sides. This week we were going to discuss Lineated Faces. As a recap, collectively the lines on the sides or faces of crystals are referred to as Lineation. To specify where the Lineation occurs, you add "side" or "face".

picture of Lineation - Lineated Sides and Faces

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LINEATED SIDES - To Access Deeper Understanding

This week we were going to discuss Lineated Sides and Lineated Faces. Collectively they are referred to as Lineation. To specify where the Lineation occurs, you add "side" or "face". Because the blog post grew and grew, I have decided to break up the information. This week we'll cover Lineated Sides and next week we'll cover Lineated faces.

picture of Lineation - Lineated Sides and Faces

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Yew Pegs and Round Holes

I hate acronyms.

There's something inherently ugly, opaque, even anti-poetic about them. If I could, I'd do away with them altogether.

Oh, I'll concede them a certain prosaic utility. The term DNA has saved a lot of time and breath down the years.

Point conceded. I would, nonetheless, contend that their use is best restricted to secular contexts. They have no place in religious vocabulary.

Let me pick on a particular example. The term UPG—that's "unverified personal gnosis" to the uninitiated—has gained a certain currency in pagan circles since it was coined some time in the late “20th" century.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Erin Lale
    Erin Lale says #
    I hate the term UPG. An essay on that topic (too long to post in a comment): http://www.bubblews.com/news/9753201-language-matters
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    We, of course, distinguish between visions (which happen while we're awake, if possibly while in an altered state) and dreams, whi
  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    Thanks for the term dream-lore. I rely on dreams and whimsy to guide me through the large amount of written material out there.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Independence and Commitment

I have never really celebrated Independence Day with parties, parades, and patriotism. I was raised in Germany and studied history and - well, let’s just say patriotism makes me deeply uncomfortable. For many years I fled into the woods and celebrated InterdepenDance Day at rainbow gatherings, far away from drunken revelry and fireworks.

 

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A Fourth of July 4th meditation on patriotism

Here in Sebastopol, where I live, someone loves driving around in his pick-up with a huge American flag attached to its bed.  So far as I know he does it every day. I suppose he is making a statement about his patriotism.  Every week on the main corner here in town for years two groups face off, one loudly “supporting our troops” the other more quietly supporting peace.  The first waves flags and to my mind, sadly the second group generally does not, giving the first a visual advantage they do not deserve.  

Among people with more progressive sympathies patriotism has gotten a bit of a bad rap by being equated with those who talk the most aggressively about it, and shove their views in everyone’s face.  It’s rather like religion getting a bad rap because of the excesses of those who make the most noise about it.   I think this is too bad.  Patriotism is a complicated emotion and a complicated commitment, but it is very real for most of us.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Bull Dance

Our Minnesota weather's been lushly Mediterranean of late, so naturally (such is the life of the wandering scholar) I've been thinking about bull-leaping.

I'm wondering if maybe—just maybe—the scholars have got it wrong.

Admittedly, my knowledge of the literature on the subject is not exhaustive. Still, on the basis of information available (to me, at any rate), I have the impression that much, if not most, current scholarship assumes that what we see depicted in Minoan art—what Mary Renault so charmingly calls the Bull Dance—is a sport, if perhaps a sport with religious overtones. Discussion tends to center on whether such a sport would actually have been physically possible or not.

I am given to understand that the scenes of bull-acrobatics that we see—on the golden ring-seal shown above, for example—are simply not possible; that bulls gore sideways rather than upwards, as the leaping scenes would imply. Contemporary athletes have been unable to duplicate the classical frontal bull-leap shown in Minoan art.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Wendilyn Emrys
    Wendilyn Emrys says #
    Europa; Minotaur; & Pasiphae's luring of the Bull are all possible mythological memories of the bull dance.
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    I'm totally with you about the need for a mythological basis for bull leaping. It must have been inspired by some portion of the m
  • Steven Posch
    Steven Posch says #
    My thanks to you both: I was hoping to hear from people with more personal knowledge of the subject than this son of the suburbs c
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    BTW some of my information comes from animal trainers whose bulls appear in movies and commercials. Bulls are quite trainable and
  • Laura Perry
    Laura Perry says #
    Steven, I love your thoughts on this subject. Having grown up on a farm, I can tell you, a bull calf that is used to being handled

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