Culture Blogs


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Culture Blogs

Popular subjects in contemporary Pagan culture and practice.

Category contains 2 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

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Salt Magick

Salt Magick

Using salt in Magickal recipes

Salt is an essential component. Not only is it essential for cooking it is also a key component in many Magickal practices. Today we will take a look at why salt is so important to food and Magick. We will look at different types of salt, salt blends, how to make Black Salt. I also plan to discuss when to add salt to your recipes/foods, and methods of using salt in Magick.

Magickal Properties of Salt  

Considered one of the most sacred minerals on earth. Salt represents: Prosperity & Protection. Because it was once prized as currency and used to pay salaries; Salt is associates with financial abundance, especially when mixed with green vegetables and ingredients related to prosperity and wealth. Use salt for cleansing energies both physical and not. One of the most well-known used for salt is in creating protective Magickal barriers also known as a Circle of Salt.  

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The Broom-Rider's Dilemma

Heads or tails?

It's the classic broom-rider's dilemma: bristles in front or in back?

I'd always assumed this to be—as so often in the Craft—a matter of personal preference, or possibly denominational affiliation. But a recent conversation with Paganistan's premier Purveyor of Fine Besoms (since 1273) has convinced me otherwise.

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Justice vs. Judgment in the Tarot

King Baldwin IV: A King may move a man, a father may claim a son, but remember that even when those who move you be Kings, or men of power, your soul is in your keeping alone. When you stand before God, you cannot say, "But I was told by others to do thus." Or that, "Virtue was not convenient at the time." This will not suffice. Remember that.

—Kingdom of Heaven (2005 movie)

 

"for my thoughts are not your thoughts and your ways are not my ways, declares Yahweh.

For the heavens are as high above earth as my ways are above your ways, my thoughts above your thoughts." —Isaiah 55:6-9

 

"Am I not permitted to do what I want with what belongs to me? Or are you envious because I am generous? So the last will be first, and the first will be last.”—Matthew 20:1-16 (Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard)


 

Above are some quotes that I found relevant to the Judgment card and the Justice cards. Combining the quote "my thoughts are not your thoughts and your ways are not my ways" with the Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard was something I heard in a sermon when I went to a Catholic church with my godmother this past year. The priest there had used both quotations from the Bible as examples of man's reasoning versus God's reasoning, and applying man's reasoning to decisions that God makes is inherently faulty.

 

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Is there a genuine problem in calling Pagan religions polytheistic?

 

Polytheism, the belief in many Gods, has long been associated with Pagan religion. Some deities speak to us, some speak through us.  Some take our bodies over for a while and some bring us to our knees in awe.  Deities manifest differently in some traditions than others, but all appear part of an animate inspirited world bigger than we are, and Pagans find it appropriate to honor, invoke, learn from, and even love these entities.Often personal altars can be syncretistic, as is this one focused on healing entities and energies.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    We are on exactly the same page I think!
  • Birch
    Birch says #
    Well, that Quote is merely Gardner's. I get torn honestly. Part of me feels as though One is a disco ball and each deity a singula
  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    I think there is much truth here Birch. But it becomes paradoxical if read as if we are in some way more fundamental than the God
  • Birch
    Birch says #
    This Monist approach can be summed up here: the Gods are real, not as persons, but as vehicles of power. Much food for thought upo

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She of the White Track

What does it smell like, the Milky Way?

Well, I think I know.

Walking down the sidewalk, unaccountably, I find myself thinking of honey. Then it surfaces, a sweetness almost subliminal. I stop and consciously immerse myself in breath. It's June, and the clover is blooming.

White clover. Trefoil (“three-leaf”). Trifolium repens (“creeping”). That's Anglo-Saxon, French, and Latin, respectively.

Moon clover, Moon honey.

Shamrock's the Irish. (Seamrog, diminutive of seamar, “clover.”) Saint who? Pfft, nonsense. It's Hers, all the way. Waxing, Full, and Waning: Three. (During the Dark, there is no Moon. Then again, maybe that's what makes that fourth leaf special.)

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Sweet Little Lies

 The Linestrider Tarot by Siolo Thompson 

The 7 of Swords is one of those cards that the shadow is pretty evident; especially when it is upright, but the truth is that it goes much deeper. The card conveys deception, lies, and stealing.  In most Rider Waite versions of the deck, the thief can usually be seen with his arms full of swords, walking away from the community that he stole from, as he looks back to make sure that he is getting away with it.  There is sneakiness to this card as the thief tip toes away with his bounty.

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Some People's Gods

It is told in the Toledot Yeshu that as a young man Yéshu ha-Notzrí (called by the Gentiles, Jesus of Nazareth) studied with the sages in Jerusalem. Here he heard disquieting rumors about his paternity. Knowing that only his mother could tell him the truth of the matter, he conceived a plan and went down to Natseret (Nazareth), to her house.

“Greetings, my son,” said his mother, “How fares it with thee?”

“Alas, my mother,” he said to her, “I am grievously ill.”

“Alas, my son,” said she, “Would that I could cure thee of thy illness.”

“Indeed, thou mayest do just that,” said Yeshu. “It is known to the sages of Jerusalem that if a woman should place the nipple of her breast between the doorpost and the door, and a man shall drink from it, he shall be thereby cured.”

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