All Our Relations: Pagans and the more-than-human world.

For aware Pagans the Sacred encompasses us all, rivers and mountains, oceans and deserts, grasses and trees, fish and fungi, birds and animals. Understanding the implications of what this means, and how to experience it first hand, involves our growing individually and as a community well beyond the limits of this world-pathic civilization. All Our Relations exists to help fertilize this transition.

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Gus diZerega

Gus diZerega

Gus diZerega DiZerega combines a formal academic training in Political Science with decades of work in Wicca and shamanic healing. He is a Third Degree Elder in Gardnerian Wicca, studied closely with Timothy White who later founded Shaman’s Drum magazine, and also studied Brazilian Umbanda  for six years under Antonio Costa e Silva.

DiZerega holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from UC Berkeley, has taught and lectured in the US and internationally, and has organized international academic meetings.

His newest book is "Faultlines: the Sixties, the Culture Wars, and the Return of the Divine Feminine (Quest, 2013) received a 'silver' award by the Association of Independent Publishers for 2014. It puts both modern Pagan religion and the current cultural and political crisis in the US into historical context, and shows how they are connected.

His second book "Pagans and Christians: The Personal Spiritual Experience" won the Best Nonfiction of 2001 award from  The Coalition of Visionary Resources. 

His third, coauthored with Philip Johnson, "Beyond the Burning Times: A Pagan and a Christian in Dialogue" is what it sounds like. He particularly like his discussion of polytheism in it, which in his view is an advance over the discussion in Pagans and Christians.

His pen and ink art supported his academic research in graduate school and frequently appeared in Shaman’s Drum, and the ecological journals Wild Earth, and The Trumpeter.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
May Day 2015: Looking deeper

I write this on Beltane eve, later than I hoped.  A bout with some bug has laid me low and I will not be up to my usual activities this Sabbat.  But perhaps my enforced period of solitude has enabled me to think a little more deeply than I might have about the meaning of this time.

Beltane and May Day comprise one of the two most important Wiccan Sabbats, the other, Samhain, being six months away.  For Wiccans and most other NeoPagans Beltane marks the beginning of summer.  We believe every basic dimension of physical existence is sacred in its own way, and seek to honor each at that time of the year when it can be most powerfully symbolized in ritual and celebration.  Beltane and May Day so honor summer.

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  • Lizann Bassham
    Lizann Bassham says #
    As always, thank you for your wisdom and insight Gus.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs
Earth Day 2015: a Pagan take

 

Earth day symbolizes Americans’, some of us anyway, beginning to experience this land as our home rather than a real estate investment, crash pad, or monument to our ego.  It is a place we love and within which we find renewal and meaning.  And we feel blessed to live here and want to take care of it, and to give back some of what we have received.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

About a week ago I posted an essay on Patheos as a Pagan contribution to a series of short pieces by people of many traditions as to the value of religion today. I really like it, and now that Patheos has had it a week, I want to make it available to others, and so I have posted a version here

__________________

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I have just returned from a Women and the Land  conference held in Point Reyes, California.  It was a wonderful series of panels, whose presenters were almost all women authors: poets, essayists, and fiction and non fiction writers. Given my interest in how the feminine and ecology fit together  as a unified theme in needed cultural changes that might yet save our nihilistic Western culture, I expected to enjoy it. And I did, far more than I expected.

             That said, this column and the next will deal with an error I heard there, and with its solution. I think the error runs through the thinking of many women and men whose hearts are in the right place. And its solution is easy once we recognize it and take the time to digest its implications. It is also very relevant to Pagans.

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  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    Thank you Connie. BB
  • Connie Lazenby
    Connie Lazenby says #
    I just loved this. Being very connected to nature and the spirit of a place, i have different rituals that end with the same resul

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

As with every year, this year’s Pantheacon offered too rich a menu of workshops and performances for any of us to see all we wanted. This year I was lucky. Several of my favorite Pagan singers (and wonderful people as well) offered back-to-back performances, and I was able to see them all. Ruth Barrett and Holly Tannen  were prominent Pagan minstrels and bards when I first entered our community back in 1984.

    b2ap3_thumbnail_Ruth-serious.jpg b2ap3_thumbnail_Holly-Tannen.jpg

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Anti-choice advocates claim the ethical high ground. They continually use language such as “pro-life,” call a fetus a “baby,” and proclaim their devotion to the well-being of the unborn.  They contrast this with the heartlessness of ‘choice.’ Even when we disagree it is tempting to treat them as acting in good faith.

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  • Gus diZerega
    Gus diZerega says #
    I looked at your page. Nicely done, good art. I have no problem at all with people Pagan or otherwise who are "pro-life" so long
  • ProLifePagan
    ProLifePagan says #
    Not wishing to argue. Just reply and provide you with a opportunity to understand you may have some flaws in your arguements regar

 

There is a quite different argument against abortion I have heard from several Pagan women.  I am more sympathetic to it than to the usual “fetus is human” claim that I demolished in my previous post.   Even so, I think it ultimately fails, though it does complicate a woman’s decision.

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