From the Oak: Let’s hear it for the God!

Many are those that focus on female divinities, leaving male divinities in the shadows if they get mentioned at all. This is a shame. Here I will share my thoughts, stories and prayers on male divinities. Currently focusing on divinities placed in an atheist "graveyard".

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Melia/Merit Brokaw

Melia/Merit Brokaw

So much has changed for me in the last year. I'm an eclectic polytheist whose main divinities are Heru-ur, Isis, Zeus, Hermes and Hestia. I'm a mother, wife and Librarian living in the Rocky Mountains stumbling on my path and wondering what the heck I'm doing. Blessed be.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

How do you write about a goddess when there is so little known?  Furrina is the next deity from the atheists’ “graveyard” and I’ve been stuck on what to write for her for months.  She is of ancient origins, probably an Etruscan goddess adopted into the Roman pantheon as a goddess of springs. 

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  • Virginia Carper
    Virginia Carper says #
    As a Roman Polytheist, I can tell you that Furrina is related to water. On July 25, the Furrinalia was held for the Goddess Furrin

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Nabu is one of the most important Mesopotamian deities.  His name can be interpreted to mean brilliant, one-who-names, announcer, or herald. Associated with Apollo by the Greeks, Mercury by the Romans, and Thoth by the Egyptians, he was the scribe and minister of Marduk, head of the pantheon.

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  • Anthony Gresham
    Anthony Gresham says #
    I remember reading an article in Biblical Archaeology Review about a site that might contain a third temple to Yaho, the god of Is
  • Melia/Merit Brokaw
    Melia/Merit Brokaw says #
    Interesting! A great example of eclecticism. I agree.

Posted by on in Culture Blogs

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Today I’m going to tell you about Reshep, a Syrian god of war and thunder, who became popular in Egypt.  In Egypt, he was also associated with pestilence.  This god is the latest divinity from the atheists’ graveyard.

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Gong-gong is the Chinese god of floods and is the next divinity I am remembering from the atheist “graveyard”.  July is the start of the flood season for most rivers in China.  It is a huge challenge to those who work the land.  The rivers are a double-edge sword; without water nothing will grow but with too much water, lives and crops can be lost.  So it is very much a love/hate relationship with these fast moving rivers.  The Chinese have several eccentric river gods and Gong-gong is one of them.

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Posted by on in Culture Blogs

Nergal is the next "graveyard" divinity that I am honoring.  I found his tales very interesting, especially that he was associated with Hercules.  Nergal was conceived in the underworld when his mother went to rescue her rapist from his punishment.  

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I've been on staff for this small retreat for [mumble] years and have attended for many more before that.  Dragonfest is a family-friendly pagan and polytheist retreat situated in the foothills outside Denver, Colorado.  This retreat is my home away from home that I only get to visit for a short 5 days, once a year.  It is the place I dream of when stress has taken over my life.  It is the place where I feel the most accepted.  Since it has been awhile since I've posted anything due to an extremely busy summer, I thought I'd tell you about this year's Dragonfest which ran August 3 - 7, 2016.

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Imset (Imseti, Imsety) is one of the four sons of Horus the Elder whose heads topped the canopic jars after the 18th Dynasty.  From the First Intermediate Period through the 18th Dynasty, the stoppers were shaped in the likeness of the deceased.  These jars typically contained various organs of a mummified body.  This group of divinities was considered protectors of these organs which were necessary in the afterlife. Imset is another divinity wrongly placed the graveyard of the atheists.

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