From the Oak: Let’s hear it for the God!

Many are those that focus on female divinities, leaving male divinities in the shadows if they get mentioned at all. This is a shame. Here I will share my thoughts, stories and prayers on male divinities. Currently focusing on divinities placed in an atheist "graveyard".

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Melia/Merit Brokaw

Melia/Merit Brokaw

I'm an eclectic polytheist whose main divinities are Heru-ur, Bast, Sobek, Yinepu Isis, Zeus-Serapis, and Yemaya. I'm a mother, wife and Librarian living in the Rocky Mountains stumbling on my path and wondering what the heck I'm doing. Blessed be.

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This week’s tribute (#7) is to the goddess, Laverna, the Roman goddess of thieves, frauds, plagiarists, hypocrites and ne’er-do-wells.

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The next deity (#6) from the “god graveyard” is Loki.  Loki interests me unlike a very large part of the Norse Pantheon, even more so than Odin and Thor.  Maybe it is his association with fire (fire sign here [grin]) or the devotion of Sigyn.  More likely it is the fact that he doesn’t fit in anywhere (as I often feel that way).  Yet it could e my tendency to cheer on the underdog or maybe his similarities to Hermes.  Any way he incites a cautious curiosity in me. 

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Next up in my tributes to the Gods placed in the atheist graveyard, I honor Janus, Divine Doorkeeper.  Yet I've already written about him once as Janus, God of Libraries, so below I leave you with an interesting excerpt of Ovid's Fasti (Book 1):  

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The tale of Tiamat could be seen as a creation story.  It could be seen as patriarchy overwhelming matriarchy.  If there are those that honor this creatrix, this goddess of chaos, I did not find them.  I did however find a tale of her fate.  A tale of a wounded heart:   first by the patriarch’s threat to her children, then by the death of her consort before a final death claimed her.  Yet if she lives on in memory, is she truly dead?  I don't know.  Mayhap, her inclusion in the god “graveyard” was deserved though not in the fashion the atheists intended.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Melia/Merit Brokaw
    Melia/Merit Brokaw says #
    Interesting! Thanks for commenting!
  • Fritz Muntean
    Fritz Muntean says #
    In the Enuma Elish, a Sumerian creation myth of the 13th to 11th century BCE, the chaotic state of the world -- before Creation to
  • Meredith Everwhite
    Meredith Everwhite says #
    I know this is an almost five-year-old article and comment, but it was recommended for me not too long ago and after reading all t

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The next divinity in my tribute to the deities in the “god graveyard” is the Northern European Eostre (Eastre, Ostara) goddess of the dawn and of spring.

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A Modern Hellenic Tale of Winter Solstice Eve

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I love this time of year...though I could do without the single to negative digit temperatures.  A lot of my traditions haven't changed from what I did as a child in a Roman Catholic household but I do have some additions.  Below, in random order, I list some of my holiday traditions.

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