From the Oak: Let’s hear it for the God!

Many are those that focus on female divinities, leaving male divinities in the shadows if they get mentioned at all. This is a shame. Here I will share my thoughts, stories and prayers on male divinities. Currently focusing on divinities placed in an atheist "graveyard".

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Melia/Merit Brokaw

Melia/Merit Brokaw

I'm an eclectic polytheist whose main divinities are Heru-ur, Bast, Sobek, Yinepu Isis, Zeus-Serapis, and Yemaya. I'm a mother, wife and Librarian living in the Rocky Mountains stumbling on my path and wondering what the heck I'm doing. Blessed be.

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The next divinity from the “God Graveyard” list is the very well documented Lithuanian Perkunas.  He is very similar to Zeus and Jupiter.  One website described him as a cross between Odin and Thor. 

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The next divinities from the “God Graveyard" list are the Slavic divinities Belbog and Chernobog.  They interest me because I have Slovenian (Bohjon) ancestry.  I’ve been a bit intimidated in researching these divinities because I want to get it right.  Unlike many other pantheons there are no firsthand accounts for this pantheon.  There is no irrefutable evidence that the Slavs had any system of writing so all their beliefs and traditions were passed down orally.  This creates or enables many individual characteristics within that belief system (a fancy way of saying that there are as many differences as similarities in the details of their belief system).  While there are many archeological remains, there is no contextual understanding to be had.  The only time anything was written down was by Christian missionaries who were not always interested in accuracy in depicted Pagan beliefs.  Fragments of the old beliefs are found in folk customs, songs and tales.  This is not to say that this pantheon is not still honored, for it is, but I imagine Slavic rely heavily upon similarities in other belief systems and on unsubstantiated personal knosis (aka UPG).

The existences of both of these deities, Belbog especially, are heavily contested.  So let me tell you what I have found out about them and then offer an interesting possible conclusion that I stumbled across.  Belbog and Chernobog are twins and, one could say, the mirror images of the other.  One website stated that they were honored by the priestly class. 

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  • Melia/Merit Brokaw
    Melia/Merit Brokaw says #
    I recently was given a helpful link that discusses the twin. Wish I had this before I posted the blog. http://ofepicproportion

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So while the Pagan blogosphere is reacting to the God Graveyard fiasco, I figured it would be more interesting to learn about some of the deities that were on the list.  I found a short list on Sannion’s blog.  If anyone finds a longer list or a complete list, I’d love to have it.

So the first god I’m starting with is Shezmu (Shesmu, Shesemu, Shezmou, Shesmou, Sezmu, Sesmu, Schesmu, Schezemu), an ancient Egyptian god of the underworld. 

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Pagans are human too.  Sometimes I have to remind myself of this.  The latest kerfuffle in the wider Pagan community leaves me surprised and yet not surprised all at the same time.  I like to think that Pagans, as a group, are better than this but obviously we are not.

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  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ms. Brokaw, Whilst I don't feel that a website devoted to Pagan community issues is necessarily an appropriate venue for a de fac

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As you carve those pumpkins,
as you dress in costume,
as you trick or treating go,
as you seek entertainment,
as you avoid the wild shades,
do not forget to raise a glass
to the departed Persephone.
Tonight at the witching hour,
the gates of the Underworld
clang loudly shut with dread finality.
Closing securely within not only her
but also the restless dead.
Do not forget to raise a glass
to the patiently brooding Hades.
For his love has returned to his arms
after a lengthy, lonely separation.
Do not forget to raise a glass
to Demeter the mourning mother.
May her lament be not too harsh
upon her mortal children.
Do not forget to raise a glass
to your beloved dead.
May they rest peacefully
until their time of return.
Raise a glass and be thankful
that you are not with them
in the dark realm of below.
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I’m told that I have a thing for the “bad boys” of the Greek pantheon and maybe that is true.  Yet it is because I see past their “popular” labeling to someone worthy of my attention and respect.  So let me tell you about the bad boy that seems to surpass even Ares.  He is the ultimate freak out for some people.  Haides, God of the Underworld.

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The thought of ancestor worship makes me flinch.  It is not that I do not respect my ancestors or think that they are not deserving of honor, because they do.  It is the phrase “worship” that gives me pause.  The only ones deserving of worship are the gods. 

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