Sisterhood of the Antlers

Stories of the Ancestral Mothers of Scotland from folk magic and the wise women who honored them. Rooted in the Bean Feasa (Wise Woman) tradition.

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Jude Lally

Jude Lally

I am descended from a long line of wise women – for I too am a shapeshifter, a mythmaker, a woman who has always had one ear to the ground and a foot in the other world. I am a listener to old bones and a collector of stories that I gather from the shorelines, deep in forests or atop mountains. Sometimes my shadow shows my other selves sometimes crow sometimes bear, I am She Who Wears Antlers.

I am a radical doll maker, taking this tradition back to its roots and the hands of my foremothers. They remind us of our sacred connection to this world, the otherworld and our ancestors. I am a collector of stories, carrying old ones and those who need retelling.

I am inspired by the Bean Feasa tradition, a wise woman tradition that stretches back past pre-Celtic generations. People sought the wisdom of the wise woman in times of personal crisis and today this tradition can help us face this deepening global crisis.

I am a cultural activist working from the Bean Feasa tradition rooted in pre-patriarchy which honors imagination and creativity and provides us with tools that can help us overcome the psychological effects of patriarchy.

Visit my website for details of online courses, in-person workshops and our annual pilgrimage to the lands of the Ancestral Mothers of Scotland.

Posted by on in Paths Blogs

b2ap3_thumbnail_Screen-shot-2018-08-22-at-7.37.38-PM.pngWow, a beautiful, and sad, film narrated by Yuwali, an indigenous Australian. Her story starts at the age of 17 and now at 62 she recalls her life with insight, drama and great descriptions of what she was thinking when she saw her first ever white man and motor vehicle.
 
The story is the voice of this woman, an elder from the oldest culture on the planet - the insights into their relationship with the land, each other, their stories and the dingo's is fascinating. How wonderful they were able to live as they have always done even although their country had been colonized for 200 years. Yet sadly, the white man caught up with them, completely misunderstood them - tied them up and carted them off to camps.
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What's unique about this film is hearing it from Yuwali's perspective, in her native tongue as she and her family see some of the original footage taken of them all those years ago.
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The Ancestral Mothers Wheel of the Year

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                                Orca with the Isle of Eigg in the background and the peaks of Rum in the distance.                                                        Click photo for source - Wilderness Scotland

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  • Rod Thorn
    Rod Thorn says #
    Thanks for the info!

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Tahlequah

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A Lughnasadgh Lament?

(or  In the  Time Before Lugh)

 

I remember a time before Lugh was born. This time of year was a time of great gatherings. Yet where is my great gathering? Where are my sisters, and mothers, my aunts and my grandmothers?

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Snakestones, Hagstones and a Witch Burning

 

Holey stones are part of a long magical curative tradition in the UK. Different regions of the UK used the stones for different uses, throughout the country holey stones are known as hagstones, witch stones, snake stones, Druids stones and mare stones to name a few. These stones were used to curing eye issues curing diseases in cattle, protecting horses from night-hags and preventing nightmares and to help children through teething (which in the 1700-1800's in Glasgow, Scotland was the cause of a considerable infant mortality).

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