The Three Cauldrons: Celtic Myth and Spiritual Wisdom

Academic and historically based study and exploration of authentic Celtic religion, mythology, druidism, folklore, literature, languages, wisdom texts, archaeology, ethnography, ritual, poetry and visionary practices, as well as the anthropologically supported identification of shamanic elements in Celtic contexts.

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Síthearan NicLeòid

Síthearan NicLeòid

Born on the eve of Lugnasad, your guide and ban-fili/ban-druí is a published author, teacher, and Celtic singer and musician. She trained in Celtic Studies through Harvard University, and has taught Celtic mythology and folklore at the university level. Her research in Celtic myth and religion has been presented at the University of Edinburgh, University College Cork, the International Celtic Congress, the Harvard Graduate Study Group for Ancient Magic and Religion, and the Ford Foundation Lecture Series.

She has served as Faculty at the Celtic Institute of North America and the Omega Institute, and her books include: ‘Celtic Myth and Religion: A Study of Traditional Belief' (McFarland), ‘Celtic Cosmology and the Otherworld: Mythic Origins, Sovereignty and Liminality’ (McFarland), 'The Divine Feminine in Ancient Europe' (McFarland), ‘'Queen of the Night' (Weiser), ‘Early Celtic Poetry and Wisdom Texts: The Three Cauldrons, The Songs of Amairgen, and other Cultural Studies’ (forthcoming) and a chapter in the academic collection ‘Celtic Mythology in the 21st Century’ (University of Wales Press).

Currently she is Director of the Eolas ar Senchais research project, which received international grant funding to research and restore authentic ancient Celtic instrumental music and vocal art forms, and historically attested Celtic ritual in socio-religious context.

She sings in many of the modern and medieval Celtic languages and is a multi-instrumentalist. Her previous musical group, The Moors, has cult status in the pagan world. She leads workshops and distance training programs, with new books, CD's and research on the way.

For those of you who have already read Lesson One (the link for which is below), and those who will read it upcoming, please note that lessons may contain changes after they are first posted, to correct missed typos, add or remove information to provide clarification, or other helpful adjustments. This process has already begun for Lesson One, so please check in again before the next lesson is posted, as you may wish to re-read or re-print the lessons once they’ve been adjusted for best clarity!

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In these tutorials, we are going to learn how to pronounce words in Old Irish. This is a form of Irish / Gaelic which is seen in the earliest manuscripts (c. 600-900 CE / AD). 

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  • Síthearan NicLeòid
    Síthearan NicLeòid says #
    Hi Paul, and thanks for your message
  • Paul E. Crabb
    Paul E. Crabb says #
    Hi Sharon, Thank you for this very interesting and informative upload. I have a question about the various pronunciations of the w

Blessings of the New Moon to all!  I wanted to share with you some thoughts and information pertaining to an excellent discussion topic that arose on the private Túatha Imbais group.

One member suggested that we explore “The changes myth and oral literature would have undergone in literary redaction, and what and how we can learn about early pagan worldview from literary redactions."

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  • Kris Hughes
    Kris Hughes says #
    This is great information! The endlessly growing bibliography is a useful tool to help us filter, to some extent, what our ancesto
  • Síthearan NicLeòid
    Síthearan NicLeòid says #
    Thank you, Kris! Every tool that can help us filter, that can help guide us, brings us that much closer to connection, understandi

In Western culture, we have often been taught that darkness is bad and light is good, and that life energies begin at the point at which light is perceived.  However, if we look at other cultures, particularly traditional cultures, they are not as influenced by Judeo-Christian traditions as is our modern culture. Light and dark can be understood as important parts of a holistic existence.

Our culture is also very lacking in a healthy understanding of and relationship to death. We don’t speak about it, we don’t learn about it, and it is to be avoided at all cost.

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  • Síthearan NicLeòid
    Síthearan NicLeòid says #
    Erika there are strange typos in the above. I’m not sure how to edit after submitting. Let me know if anything is not clear!
  • Erika Rivertree
    Erika Rivertree says #
    I reckoned twas a tech glitch. Heh, no worries, I understand your post. So, yes, transhumance; “going up to shieling” in Summerti
  • Síthearan NicLeòid
    Síthearan NicLeòid says #
    How delightful to chat with someone who knows the word ‘transhumance.’
  • Erika Rivertree
    Erika Rivertree says #
    I just ordered your new book. I enjoyed reading "Celtic Myth & Religion" a few years ago. I look forward to reading your new one.
  • Síthearan NicLeòid
    Síthearan NicLeòid says #
    That’s wonderful to hear! Searles did an amazing job, didn’t he? I hope you enjoy it and that you find it of service and inspirat

 

 

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Hello, and blessings to all!

It's been quite a few months since my last posting, as I was busy finishing up a new book, which should be out later this year. The working title is "Celtic Cosmology and the Otherworld: Mythic Origins, Sovereignty and Liminality," and it's on a small and wondrous academic press - McFarland (you can get on their mailing list to receive up to the moment notices).

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  • Síthearan NicLeòid
    Síthearan NicLeòid says #
    Thank you very much! I'm glad you enjoyed the post and hope you enjoy The Moors music and Eldritch too! Wishing you many spring bl
  • Jamie
    Jamie says #
    Ms. NicLeoid, That is some great stuff! I'll definitely get your CD. It's great that you have invested so much of yourself in pre

Last winter I moved from the city to a small, rural town, seeking a deeper and more frequent connection with nature, quiet space for introspection, and a more flexible lifestyle (as the cost of living is much less out here). I arrived on Imbolc, raw from almost two years of misfortune and disconnection, and felt Brigid's presence as I was rebirthed into a warm blanket of a welcoming home, land and a new start. I gave thanks that day, and immediately went outside into the still, white blanket of snow and made offerings to the Guardian Spirits of the land, thanking them for bringing me here, and asking for their blessings. I felt immediately that my offerings had been well received. 

Almost daily I walked a few yards from my apartment into a small patch of forest where I could be alone with the Spirits, creating a path in the snow that I followed each day, and which sometimes deer followed as well (as I noted from their hoofprints). At other times, it was their path that I followed, although we never saw each other. I reveled in the clean air, the wisdom of the tall trees above me, and a place to sit in utter stillness.

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  • Síthearan NicLeòid
    Síthearan NicLeòid says #
    Thank you Carol! It's more personal than many of my postings, but it felt right. Are you well? I hope your life and work are on a
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    This is beautiful, showing us a path to reconnection with the land, our communities, ourselves!

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