Pagan Studies


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Studies Blogs

Advanced and/or academic Pagan subjects such as history, ethics, sociology, etc.

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Ch. 1 of Her Hidden Children

Hey everyone! Im back after an unexpected hiatus. If you like, you can read along (or just watch and listen) to my forthcoming reviews and summaries of Her Hidden Children by Chas Clifton. It's a book that explores how Wicca and Paganism spread and developed across America. The review starts about two minutes in after some updates.

Side note/Correction: Buckland is still alive, when I say he was a prominent writer, I was thinking about a different author. My bad! 

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Claremont Pagan Studies Conference - II (2016)

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Claremont Pagan Studies Conference - I

Twelfth Conference on Current Pagan Studies at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, California.

Longtime pal Anna Korn and I shared the long drive to the Los Angeles area for this annual event that feeds my soul.  I’ve attended several times since I was invited to be a keynote speaker in 2009.  Last year was the first time Anna went now that she’s retired.

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Aline "Macha" O'Brien
    Aline "Macha" O'Brien says #
    We'll have to persuade them to invite you as a keynote. ;-)
  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    W.oman, do you never rest? Thanks for this. Someday I hope to attend

Posted by on in Studies Blogs

I am responding to two excellent pieces in the recent Witches & Pagans #31 – Anne Newkirk Nivens' Evocation and Jessica Marie Baumgartner's Give & Take. They make great bookends for a very important subject.

Not all readers will agree with my conclusions – and this is why most of us will always be solitaries. After all, the hallmarks of Neopaganism are creativity and individuality – not to mention a terrible allergy to being told what to believe!

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Great stuff! I must share a link to it. I love your line "I respect those who disagree with me, but are polite enough not to insu
  • tehomet
    tehomet says #
    Sweet wisdom. Thank you for posting.
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Thank you for liking, tehomet.
  • Cindi Dean Wafstet
    Cindi Dean Wafstet says #
    Other than being a teacher of yoga, I feel like I could have written these same words. I close to your age (65) and have also stud
  • Ted Czukor
    Ted Czukor says #
    Bless you, Cindi. It feels nice to be understood.

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Meditations on Hávamál: 66-70

 

Here are a few more verse in my ongoing translation and discussion of the Old Norse poem:

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Kate Laity
    Kate Laity says #
    I am working on scripts too. Hmmm. Are we feeling a need to drag more folks into the ritual?
  • Byron Ballard
    Byron Ballard says #
    Brilliant. I feel a play coming on....

Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Blessed Imbolg! Blessed Brighid!

The holiday that is known both by Brighid and by Imbolg has long been a favorite of mine. I adore the thought of all those sleepy little seeds under the surface of the earth getting ready to move upwards towards the sun in the depths of winter. The painting that accompanies this blog post is one from a few years ago that I did of the Goddess Brighid. I have often seen her as a young, joyful woman, bursting forth in flame. I find that I wish to paint her again as my image of her has matured as I have matured. 

 

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Posted by on in Studies Blogs
Cracking Through the Ice

Several days ago, I had a lovely, lovely moment. Sitting in the arch of a big, picture window, I felt the rays of the sun as more than just a heatless hint of things to come. There was, for the first time, a weight to the rays’ touch and I felt the distinctive crack of the cold ice within - that first inkling that the thaw is on its way. Unsurprisingly, the next day brought plummeting temperatures along with re-found gloves and snow brushes for the car. But the tide had turned. Imbolc had reached out its delicate fingers to tickle 2016 for the first time and there is no pulling back from that.

 

As far as weather goes, it hasn’t been a bad winter. We’ve certainly had worse. The snow shovels, for the most part, have bided their time leaning up against the house and the dogs are sorely disappointed that they have not had the opportunity to carve racing tunnels in the snow with their chases. On other fronts, however, this winter has been the worst yet. We have said goodbye to far too many folks – both personally and globally. So many that, in truth, when the news was announced that Glenn Frey had died last week, my husband, a down-to-earth, practical, self-declared atheist, stopped in his tracks, raised his arms to the Heavens and declared “Enough already!”.  The all too frequent heart-stopping announcements were taking their toll. It may not have been too bad outside, but our insides were feeling quite numb.

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