The Goddess Way: Ancient Stories for Modern Hearts

Judith Shaw both paints and writes about the Goddess, great symbol of life, death and the natural world. For the past few years she has focused on the Celtic Goddesses, whose stories are explored here in The Goddess Way.

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Judith Shaw

Judith Shaw

Judith Shaw, a New Orleans native and graduate of the San Francisco Art Institute, has always been interested in myth, culture and mysticism. Her work, inspired by the goddess, nature and sacred geometry, combines whimsy and the esoteric - whimsical tree paintings which often look like women dancing are intertwined with esoteric symbols such as those found in sacred geometry. After graduation, while living in Greece, the Goddess first appeared in her artwork. The Divine Feminine, in all of Her manifestations in this world, continues to inspire Judith.    Judith has also lived in Mexico and visited France, Italy, Turkey, China, Guatemala, and Jamaica. She now lives in Albuquerque where she divides her time between painting, writing, yoga, gardening, bee keeping, and hanging out with friends and family.  She is putting the final touches on a deck of Celtic Goddess cards which will be published soon.  

Posted by on in SageWoman Blogs
Blodeuwedd, Flower Goddess

Blodeuwedd, known as the Ninefold Goddess of the Western Isles of Paradise, was a goddess like no other in the manner of her birth. She is one of the main figures in the Mabinogion, the Welsh cycle of stories of the early Celtic Goddesses and Gods.

Divinatory Meaning

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Creiddylad, Welsh Goddess of Love and Flowers

Creiddylad, (cree-THIL-ahd) Welsh Goddess of Flowers and Love, is celebrated on Beltane, better known today as May Day. Creiddylad is the eternal May Queen, always seeking peace and stability. She remains eternally constant in the face of all change.

Divinatory Meaning

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Judith Shaw
    Judith Shaw says #
    Hi Carol, Thanks! Glad to be here - another great community.
  • Carol P. Christ
    Carol P. Christ says #
    Love to see your art and words here, welcome, Judith!
Etain, Goddess of Love, Transformation, and Rebirth

Etain (Ay-deen), known as the Shining One, was originally a Sun Goddess before becoming a Moon Goddess, and finally a White Lady of the Fae. Her story, which lasts over one thousand years, reveals her place as a Goddess of Love, Transformation, and Rebirth. Elements sacred to Etain are the sun, dawn, the sea, rain, water, butterflies, apple blossoms, and swans. She is associated with healing and the transmigration of souls.

Divinatory Meaning
Overcoming difficult circumstances, spiritual awakening, transformation, wholeness, rebirth, true love, internal beauty. Etain, the Shining One, helps when your journey becomes difficult. She guides you back to your own shining light.

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Brigid, She Who Reigns During The Time of Light

Brigid, Goddess of Healing, Poetry, and Smithcraft, begins her reign on Imbolc, February 2, the midpoint between winter solstice and spring equinox. On this day the ancient Celts held their Fire Festival in honor of Brigid and the growing light. In Scotland, as recently as the mid-twentieth century, houses were cleaned and the hearth fires rekindled on February 2 to welcome in Brigid. 

Divinatory Meaning

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The Cailleach, Dark Winter Goddess

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Fand, a Shapeshifting Goddess for Samhain

 

We are nearing Samhain, a day in which pagans honor the ancestors and prepare for the coming dark of winter. It is the time of year when communication between the two worlds of the living and the deceased is the thinnest. The Celts did not honor any particular deity on this day, but rather recognized the whole spectrum of supernatural forces. Fand, Celtic Sea Goddess and gatekeeper to the Otherworld is a fitting goddess to remember during this period

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Artio, Goddess of Wild Life, Transformation, and Abundance

Artio, Celtic Goddess of Wild Life, Transformation, and Abundance, is one of the more obscure goddesses in the Celtic pantheon. She is often shown with baskets of plenty and surrounded by animals. Artio is frequently depicted as a bear. Her name comes from the old Celtic word for bear, arth(e), which the Roman’s Latinized to Artos.

Artio arrived in western Europe with the Helvetii, a Celtic tribe, who migrated to Switzerland around 450 BC. They worshipped Her as the “She-Bear”. 

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Recent Comments - Show all comments
  • Francesca De Grandis
    Francesca De Grandis says #
    Judith, lovely article, thank you. Mother Bear protects and nurtures me, so it was wonderful to read your view of Her. As a littl
  • Judith Shaw
    Judith Shaw says #
    Hi Thessel, Sorry but I do not really know much about the Old Europe script except for what I referenced here. I'll see if I can
  • Thesseli
    Thesseli says #
    Can you tell us more about the Old Europe script?

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